...

2012 Olympic Games - Report of the IOC Evaluation

by user

on
Category:

travel

13

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

2012 Olympic Games - Report of the IOC Evaluation
Report of the
IOC Evaluation Commission
for the
Games of the XXX Olympiad
in 2012
Report of the
IOC Evaluation Commission
for the Games of the
XXX Olympiad
in 2012
I
N T E R N A T I O N A L
O
L Y M P I C
C
© International Olympic Committee
Lausanne, Switzerland
22 March 2005
Original version: English
O M M I T T E E
CONTENTS
Contents
3
Introduction
4
Paris
9
New York
27
Moscow
45
London
63
Madrid
81
Summaries
97
Appendices
103
4
INTRODUCTION
Introduction
c
d
b
a
a
e
b
c
d
e
5
The IOC Evaluation Commission for the Games of
the XXX Olympiad in 2012 (the Commission) is
pleased to present the results of its evaluation of the
five Candidate Cities for these Games. Listed in the
official order of drawing of lots, these cities are Paris
(FRA), New York (USA), Moscow (RUS), London
(GBR) and Madrid (ESP).
Nine cities initially submitted applications to host
the 2012 Olympic Games: Paris (FRA), Leipzig
(GER), New York (USA), Istanbul (TUR), Havana
(CUB), Moscow (RUS), London (GBR), Madrid (ESP)
and Rio de Janeiro (BRA). The nine cities were
assessed by a group of experts who presented a
report to the IOC Executive Board. On 18 May 2004,
the IOC Executive Board selected the five Candidate
Cities listed above.
Throughout the 2012 bid process, the IOC has
continued to build on and improve the quality of
the services it offers to bid cities through the
Olympic Games observer programme, bid city
seminars and access to the IOC’s Olympic Games
Knowledge Management programme. As a result,
the 2012 Applicant and Candidate Cities have had
more information and expertise available to them
than ever before.
The Commission notes that this is reflected in the
detailed planning and comprehensive strategies
implemented by the Candidate Cities on such issues
as sustainability, accessibility and integrated city
development. In particular, it notes that the
recommendations of the IOC Olympic Games Study
Commission have been taken into consideration by
the Candidate Cities and applied according to each
city’s specific plans.
Based on such in-depth reflection and analysis, the
investments made throughout the bid process can
be seen to generate positive legacies from the bid
irrespective of whether the city is awarded
the Games. Bidding for the Olympic Games is
also proving to be a catalyst for the regeneration of
city areas, accelerated construction of general
infrastructure and sports facilities and for high-level
political, financial and administrative collaboration,
showing the unique nature and influence of the
Olympic Games.
The high quality of the candidature files and the
presentations made to the Commission during its
visits has greatly assisted the Commission in its
assessment of each city’s proposal and in the
preparation of this report. During its visits the
Commission was very pleased to meet with the IOC
members in the respective countries.
The 2012 Evaluation Commission is composed of
representatives of all components of the Olympic
Movement: the IOC, IFs, NOCs, athletes, IPC, former
organisers of Olympic Games and experts (see
Appendix A).
The Commission has carried out a detailed,
technical analysis of the five Candidate Cities, to
assist the IOC in the important decision of electing
the Host City and to underline the challenges that
could be faced in each of these cities during the
seven years leading up to and including the 2012
Olympic and Paralympic Games.
The Commission’s task is a technical and fact-finding
one: to verify the information stated in the candidature
file, to determine whether proposed plans are feasible
and to make a qualitative assessment of risk.
6
INTRODUCTION
Introduction
The Commission followed the same working
procedures in each Candidate City: briefing
sessions were held on all 17 themes of the IOC
Candidature Procedure and Questionnaire and
visits were made to each of the proposed venues in
the city (see Appendix B for visit dates).
The Commission has taken into consideration all
information received up until its departure from the
respective cities.
The Commission’s report is presented on a city-bycity basis, in the order of drawing of lots. The reports
are followed by an overall summary of each city.
The Commission’s report reflects the unanimous
opinion of its members.
GENERAL ISSUES
To complete this introduction, the following general
issues address a number of points which are
common to all Candidate Cities and are therefore
not covered in each city’s individual report.
1. Travel times
All travel times mentioned in the Commission’s
report are average 2012 bus travel times, as
provided by the Candidate Cities in their
candidature files. Where the Commission feels
travel times are not achievable, a comment has
been made in the report.
2. Accommodation (see appendix C)
The IOC requires Candidate Cities to guarantee:
- 40,000 rooms in various categories
- A USD room rate in 2012 dollars for IOC
hotels (1,800 rooms)
- For other accredited constituent groups a formula
to calculate USD 2012 room rates.
During its visit, the Commission verified the hotel
rating systems used by all Candidate Cities and
their equivalence to the internationally-accepted
star rating system used in this report.
3. Tax
The 2012 Candidate Cities were requested to
provide an analysis of all potential direct and
indirect tax exposures that parties of the Olympic
Movement would be faced with, if the Games were
organised in their country. Cities confirmed that
either tax exemptions existed, would be enacted
through legislation or that the OCOG would bear
the cost of non-recoverable withholding taxes.
4. Technology
The Commission has not commented on
technology in the individual city reports as it
considers that each of the five countries in question
has a modern technology structure and service
system and that technology infrastructure in the
five Candidate Cities would be adequate to host
Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012.
5. Security
Terrorism has become a global concern and affects
all Candidate Cities equally. The Commission has
not commented on this element of security in the
individual city reports as it considers that all cities
and their respective countries have demonstrated a
commitment to maintaining a high level of
vigilance and implementing prevention methods.
6. Natural disasters
None of the five Candidate Cities is geographically
situated in areas which are normally subject to
natural disasters.
7
7. Olympic programme
All five Candidate Cities have agreed to provide the
venues and facilities necessary for the hosting of
any potential new sport to be included on the
Olympic programme. Decisions regarding the
Olympic programme will be taken by the IOC
Session in July 2005 in Singapore.
8. Test events
Each of the five Candidate Cities has committed to
organising a test event in every sport at Olympic
venues and has made the necessary provision in
the budget.
9. Public opinion
As additional background information, the IOC
conducted its own opinion poll in the Candidate
Cities and their respective countries in December
2004. The results of this poll can be found in
Appendix D.
10. Letters of concern
As is the case with each edition of the Olympic
Games, letters of concern are addressed to the
Commission. The Commission received requests to
meet with representatives of certain groups during
its visits to London, New York and Paris, to which
it agreed. The Commission noted that none of these
groups were against the Olympic Games. Their
concerns related to specific sites and were mainly
of an environmental and social nature.
11. Torch relay
Whilst the Commission has acknowledged each
city’s plans for a torch relay in 2012, each
Candidate City was informed during the
Commission’s visit that any proposal would require
discussion with the IOC after the election of the
Host City and that such proposal would need to
comply with the IOC’s policy for the torch relay.
12. Maps
A map of each city’s project is included in Appendix
E. These maps, taken from the cities’ candidature
files, will assist readers in understanding each city’s
overall concept and to situate the venues.
13. Number of venues - counting methods
For each Candidate City, venues have been
counted according to the following principles:
- Road courses are not counted as venues
- In the case of venues with multiple halls, each
separate hall is counted as one venue.
Appendices
A. Composition of the Commission
B. List of visit dates
C. Accommodation table
D. Summary of IOC opinion poll results
E. Maps
F. Abbreviations
G. Signatures
PARIS
Paris
9
10
PARIS
Paris
OLYMPIC GAMES
CONCEPT AND
LEGACY
Dates of the Olympic Games
Paris proposes Friday 27 July to Sunday 12 August
as the period for the Olympic Games, based on the
most favourable climatic conditions for the athletes.
The traditional French summer holiday period
should ensure lower traffic and public transport
pressures and lower accommodation demands.
Legacy and impact
Paris has committed to providing a legacy to the
city, the region, French athletes and the community
generally, through the building of new sports
venues including the aquatic centre, the velodrome
and the canoe kayak slalom course and through
programmes to increase the regular participation of
young people in sport.
Olympic Games concept
Paris has based its vision on the longstanding
relationship between Olympism and France and
has planned athlete-centred Games, with significant
athlete involvement in the candidature phase. A
commitment has been made to continue this athlete
involvement through to Games organisation.
The Olympic Village would provide a significant
new housing opportunity for inner Paris through
the regeneration of a partly disused railyard and the
desire to build an exemplary sustainable urban
district which would set a new standard for urban
development in France.
The Games concept consists of two major
clusters close to the Olympic Village, encompassing
17 competition venues, including the Olympic
stadium, as well as the planned IBC/MPC.
As a consequence, approximately 77% of athletes
would compete at venues within 10 minutes of the
Olympic Village.
With the planned urban development and the
strong support for environmental responsibility and
accessibility at the highest level across all Olympic
projects, the Olympic Games legacy should be
significant.
Paris has fully taken into account the Olympic
Games Study Commission’s recommendations in
its use, in particular, of existing infrastructure and
the need for sustainable development. For this
reason, a high number of temporary venues (13)
would be used.
Plans are backed by a strong and ongoing
communications strategy starting in 2005, funds for
which are included in the OCOG budget.
The Paralympic Games are well integrated into the
planning of Paris 2012.
11
POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC CLIMATE
AND STRUCTURE
The population of the Paris region is expected to
grow from 11.1 to 11.5 million by 2012.
LEGAL ASPECTS
AND GUARANTEES
Guarantees
The bid committee has provided all guarantees
required by the IOC.
Political structure and responsibility
France is a constitutional republic with a president
elected every five years by universal suffrage. The
government is led by the Prime Minister who is
appointed by the President from the majority
parliamentary party.
The Mayor of Paris chairs the bid. The regional
government of Ile-de-France and the various local
authorities would act as head contractors on most
infrastructure projects required for the Games.
National economy
The economy is currently very stable and the
currency is strong. World Bank statistics indicate
that, in 2003, France had the fifth largest economy
in the world and a preliminary estimate on the
average annual growth rate was 0.1% with
domestic price inflation at 2.1%.
Part of the land required for the Olympic Village
and the Northern competition cluster has already
been purchased by the city. In response to the
Commission’s enquiries about the remaining land
needed for the Olympic projects, the bid committee
clarified the legal framework within which it is
planned to negotiate land purchase or carry out
land appropriation as part of the city’s development
plan. The Commission was satisfied that the land
would be available for construction.
Legislation
If Paris were awarded the Games, a special
“Olympic Law”, a copy of which was presented to
the Commission during its visit, would be
passed which would facilitate the organisation of
the Games. In view of the support expressed by
all parties, the Commission believes the law would
be passed.
Support
The President of France and all three levels of
government (national, region – Ile-de-France – and
city) are deeply involved in the bid. Political
support was demonstrated through the participation
of the Prime Minister and various government
ministers during the Commission’s visit. In addition,
all the main political parties, the corporate sector
and the labour unions support the bid.
A public opinion poll commissioned by the IOC
shows the following levels of support to host the
2012 Olympic Games: 85% support in Paris and
79% support throughout France.
Agreements
Between October and November 2004, three
separate documents were signed detailing the
different responsibilities and financial commitments
of the national government, the Ile-de-France
region and the city of Paris regarding venue
construction. The Commission believes that having
such agreements in place before the election of the
Host City is a positive factor in so far as they set out
the framework for the planning and organisation of
the Games, thus facilitating the transition to and
formation of the OCOG.
12
PARIS
Paris
CUSTOMS AND
IMMIGRATION
FORMALITIES
OCOG structure
The future OCOG would be a not-for-profit private
association under the prescriptions of civil law,
the stakeholders of which would be the city of
Paris, the Ile-de-France region, the national
authorities, and the French Olympic Committee.
A special agency established by law, the Olympic
Coordination Organisation (OCOO), would
be responsible for the timely delivery of all
permanent construction and the coordination
of public services.
Detailed explanations were provided to the
Commission concerning the transition period
between the awarding of the Games and
the formation of the OCOG. The transition team
would comprise members of the bid committee
and would be funded by the Founding Members
(city, region and state).
Entry to the country
The Olympic identity and accreditation card would
serve as official access to the country. As a member
of the European Union (EU) however, France is
subject to EU legislation. France has signed the
Schengen Agreement which allows free movement
of persons within the Schengen member states.
Negotiations with the EU would therefore be
necessary to ensure compliance with IOC
requirements, although the Commission expects
that the Athens and Turin precedents will apply in
this regard.
Work permits
Work permits, in the form of an Olympic residence
card, would be issued free of charge to temporary
foreign workers coming to France to perform
Olympic duties up to four years before the Games.
French regulations stipulate that temporary foreign
workers who are in possession of a temporary
work permit not exceeding 90 days are not subject
to French taxes. This exemption would be
improved through the implementation of the
“Olympic Law”. In addition, “Olympic offices”
would be set up in all French embassies or main
consulates one year before the Games to facilitate
the issue of visas and work permits. These offices
would also assist the various constituents of the
Olympic Movement when travelling to France for
test events.
13
ENVIRONMENT AND
METEOROLOGY
Importation of goods
The temporary importation of goods required for
the Olympic Games into France would be
authorised free of any duties.
The importation of food by delegations for
their own consumption would also be authorised,
provided that a certificate of origin is presented
and the food is consumed or exported following
the Games. The resale of such products in
France would be forbidden. Some restrictions
would apply.
Plans and actions
A major set of environmental actions is central to
the Paris bid. These actions are based on an
advanced Environmental Management System and
a comprehensive Charter of the Environment and
Sustainable Development which outlines specific
requirements and detailed specifications binding
authorities, the bid committee, the OCOG and
other Games stakeholders.
The overall plan features a detailed environmental
review (already conducted) of all Games activities
and sites to determine potential impacts and
identify ways to reduce adverse effects or provide
sustainable legacies. There is a strong emphasis on
energy conservation, with actions including major
solar power projects at venues and low and clean
energy public transport systems, as well as a
detailed eco-design plan for the Olympic Village
with which developers must comply.
The OCOG operating budget for environment
amounting to USD 23 million and projected nonOCOG spending of USD 811 million are planned
for Games-related environmental activities. Paris
has a specific programme to raise funds for
environmental initiatives, with financing coming
from an allocation of 1% of all OCOG revenue, and
from the public and private sectors. An eco-sponsor
programme would also be implemented to raise
further funds.
14
PARIS
Paris
FINANCE
Air and water quality
Air quality in Paris at proposed Games-time is
generally satisfactory, and adherence to lower EU
limits should ensure improvements by 2012.
Measures are underway to ensure that the water
quality at the proposed triathlon venue in the River
Seine would be acceptable for a Paris Games.
Water quality at rowing/canoe kayak flatwater and
sailing venues meets requirements.
OCOG budget
Paris has proposed a budget of USD 2.65 billion
with a surplus of USD 1.76 million.
Contributions from the IOC and TOP sponsors
amount to 33.9% of revenue. Revenues from local
sponsorship, official suppliers, ticket sales,
licensing and donations amount to USD 1.33 billion
or 50.2% of revenue. Lottery games dedicated to
the Olympic Games and beginning in 2008 would
generate USD 54 million for the OCOG.
Meteorology
Average temperatures (according to figures
provided, 26ºC at 3 p.m.) and humidity levels at
proposed Games-time are satisfactory, as are wind
speeds. There is an average of five precipitation
days in Paris at proposed Games-time.
Major expenditure items are technology amounting
to USD 451.6 million (17% of expenditure), sports
venue operations at USD 385.3 million (14.5%),
administration at USD 254 (9.6%), Games
workforce at USD 241.6 million (9.1%) and
transport at USD 92.4 million (3.5%).
Additional comments
Paris is seeking an overall neutral greenhouse gas
emission balance for the Games. As aircraft
emissions are included in the equation, this would
be a substantive and ambitious project, but it
appears to be achievable as France’s ratification
of the Kyoto Protocol and the introduction of
tighter controls and specific transport and energy
conservation measures should facilitate lower
emission levels.
Overall, the environmental actions are comprehensive,
innovative and integrated throughout planning and
operations, and would result in significant gains
and legacies from the Games.
No capital investment is included in the OCOG
budget, in accordance with IOC guidelines.
Non-OCOG budget
Of the USD 6.2 billion non-OCOG budget, only
USD 2.2 billion would be directly related to the
Olympic Games (USD 266.9 million for additional
transport infrastructure, USD 299.9 million for
venue construction, USD 1 billion for the
Olympic Village and USD 619.8 million for overlay).
USD 4 billion would form part of an accelerated
planned programme of investment for general
infrastructure.
15
MARKETING
Financial guarantees
The national, regional and city governments
have each committed to providing a subsidy of
USD 30 million for the Paralympic Games.
The national government has guaranteed to cover
any shortfall. In addition, specific guarantees have
been provided for the financing of infrastructure
and equipment amounting to USD 1.28 billion from
the city of Paris, USD 1.27 billion from the Ile-deFrance region and USD 985 million from the French
government. Venues owned by the city of Paris will
be made available to the OCOG free of charge.
Additional comments
The budget has been professionally prepared with
great detail. Assumptions for the budget are well
supported and documented. The budget appears to
be reasonable and achievable.
Joint Marketing Programme
The Joint Marketing Programme Agreement signed
by Paris and the French Olympic Committee has
been accepted by the IOC.
Billboards and advertising
Undertakings concerning outdoor advertising
spaces and rates have been provided by all the
municipalities involved in Paris’ project as well as
by private entities controlling advertising space, in
accordance with IOC requirements.
Rights protection
Current legislation exists to protect Olympic marks
and intellectual property rights and to prevent
street vending and illegal advertising.
Ticketing
Paris has placed strong emphasis on a
comprehensive communications strategy beginning
in 2007 to promote the Games and ticket sales.
Ticketing revenue estimates of USD 612.4 million
for the Olympic Games and USD 17.4 million for
the Paralympic Games are based on sales rates of
82% and 65% respectively. The Commission
believes that these targets are achievable.
Local sponsorship and licensing
Revenue from local sponsors and suppliers
amounts to USD 675.3 million including USD 30
million for the Paralympic Games. Licensing
revenue is projected at USD 51.7 million and coin
programme revenue at USD 5 million. These
revenue targets are considered to be realistic.
Additional comment
The marketing programme proposed by Paris is
reasonable and achievable.
16
PARIS
Paris
SPORTS AND VENUES
Overall concept
Paris proposes Games with 21 competition venues
within 10 minutes travel time of the Olympic
Village providing minimum travel times for
approximately 77% of all athletes. The concept is
based on two major competition clusters (Northern
and Western) supported by stand-alone venues in
Paris and the Ile-de-France region as well as
existing venues for sailing and football in other
cities across France.
50% of competition venues needed for the Games
already exist, are under construction or are planned
irrespective of the Games. Paris proposes the use of
7 large temporary halls to ensure minimal travel
times for athletes between competition venues and
the Olympic Village.
The Northern cluster (9 competition venues and
16 sports/disciplines) includes the existing Stade
de France which would be the 71,000-seat Olympic
stadium, and is located adjacent to the Paris ring
road less than 10 minutes from the Olympic Village
using Olympic lanes.
The Western cluster (8 competition venues / 9 sports)
includes three of the city’s well-known sports
facilities for football, hockey and tennis. It is also
adjacent to the ring road, 10 minutes from the
Olympic Village.
Stand-alone competition venues for a further
14 sports/disciplines (in some cases at high profile
Paris landmarks) are well located, with very good
road and rail access. The furthest venues from the
Olympic Village are rowing and canoe kayak
(47 km/43 minutes from the Olympic Village).
Sailing would be held at La Rochelle, 490 km from
Paris. In addition to the Stade de France and Parc
des Princes stadia in Paris, football would be
played at 4 existing stadia across France with travel
distances ranging from 231 km to 761 km. The
sailing and football cities are well served by highspeed rail services.
Travel distances/times summary
Distances/times from
Olympic Village
Number of
competition venues
0 – 10 km (5 – 10 minutes)
10 – 20 km (15 minutes)
20 – 30 km (26 – 28 minutes)
30 – 40 km (35 minutes)
40 – 50 km (43 minutes)
50 – 100 km
100 km and over
21
1
2
1
2
0
5 (football and sailing)
Venue construction status
Under
Games dependent
Existing
construTotal
ction or
number
planned,
of sports No work
Work
venues to required required irrespective Permanent Temporary
of the
be used
Games
32
8
4
4
3
13
All new permanent venues would be built by 2011.
In addition, 3 of the 7 temporary halls would be
constructed in 2011 to ensure that test events could
be carried out for all sports/disciplines to be held
in temporary venues.
17
The “Dôme”, to be constructed as a new facility by
the French Tennis Federation, would supplement
existing facilities at Roland-Garros tennis stadium
and be used for judo and badminton during the
Olympic Games.
The “Dôme” and the canoe kayak slalom venue
would be constructed irrespective of the Games.
During the Commission’s visit, the Minister for
Youth and Sports confirmed that construction of
the aquatic centre and velodrome would now
proceed irrespective of the Games.
New venue construction would be coordinated by
a specially created government agency (OCOO)
in accordance with EU tendering policies and in
close cooperation with the OCOG. The OCOG
would assume management responsibilities for
completed venues through to the end of the
Paralympic Games.
Paris proposes a multi-sport venue at Paris Expo
where athletes from 8 sports/disciplines would be
able to train approximately 13 minutes from the
Olympic Village, while athletes from 13
sports/disciplines would train at their respective
competition venues.
Guarantees
The Commission noted that written guarantees
were received for the use of all existing venues and
proposed sites for new permanent/temporary
venues as well as for the respect of IOC
commercial requirements within these venues.
Sports experience
Paris has good sports experience having held some
24 international sports events in the past ten years
in Olympic sports/disciplines, including the 1998
Football World Cup, the 2003 Athletics World
Championships and the arrival of the annual Tour
de France.
PARIS
Paris
18
PARALYMPIC GAMES
Budget
A balanced Paralympic Games budget of USD 150.8
million is projected.
Revenues include government subsidies of
USD 90 million, sponsorship of USD 30 million
and ticket sales of USD 17.4 million.
Expenditures are based solely on incremental costs
for the Paralympic Games. The budget includes TV
signal production at USD 8.4 million. A guarantee
from the French government has been received to
cover any shortfall in the budget.
Sport
The dates proposed for the Paralympic Games are
Wednesday 29 August to Sunday 9 September. The
Olympic Games two-cluster concept would be
reinforced during the Paralympic Games with all of
the Paralympic competitions to take place in
Olympic Games venues. The competitions would
be concentrated in the Northern cluster (9 sports)
and the Western cluster (8 sports/disciplines), with
only track cycling, shooting and sailing held
outside these two clusters.
Logistics
The Village would integrate both Olympic and
Paralympic requirements with only rooms on the
lower four levels to be used by Paralympic
delegations. All of the residences would comply
with accessibility standards and each building
would have one temporary and one permanent lift.
The village would house team delegations and
International Paralympic Sports Federations (IPSF)
technical officials.
The transport operations would be an extension of
the same plan applied during the Olympic Games.
Dedicated Paralympic lanes would be in effect
for 28.6 km between key venues. Travel times for
athletes are predicted to be less than 10 minutes to
over 90% of the events.
The Ile-de-France region’s infrastructure accessibility
plans include a fully accessible bus network by
2012 and increased train and metro station
accessibility. Public transport would be free to
all accredited persons and spectators with sameday tickets.
Media and communications
Organising Committee
The organisation of the Paralympic Games would
be integrated, with the same organisational
structure responsible for both the Olympic and
Paralympic Games. A representative from the
French Paralympic Committee would be nominated
to serve on the OCOG Board of Directors. A
Paralympic Games Division would be established
and placed under the immediate supervision of the
Deputy Chief Executive of Operations.
Paris 2012’s Agenda 21 outlines specific plans
targeting improved living conditions for people with
a disability. Domestic and international strategies
are proposed to promote the Paralympic Games.
Media at the Paralympic Games would be housed in
hotels used by media during the Olympic Games.
The same IBC/MPC facilities would be used for the
Paralympic Games, although reduced to an
appropriate scale.
19
OLYMPIC VILLAGE
Additional comments
Paris 2012 has proposed integrated Games to
minimise planning and operational differences and
provide a first-rate sports event, along with a
community celebration. It would be a compact
Paralympic Games that emphasises the ideal of
sport practiced without discrimination. Several
events are planned to maintain public enthusiasm
during the transition between the Olympic and
Paralympic Games. The French Paralympic
Committee has consistently fielded strong teams
and has provided leadership within the Paralympic
Movement. The proposed fundamental legacy is
the enhanced awareness and integration of people
with a disability into French society including
improved accessibility.
Location/concept
The Olympic Village would be situated to the
north-west of the city, less than 10 km from the
Olympic stadium and the two main competition
clusters, 4 km from the city centre and 24 km from
the main gateway airport (Charles de Gaulle). An
ancillary Olympic Village would be located in La
Rochelle for sailing athletes.
Village development
Most of the accommodation would consist of new
buildings, which would be used as residential
housing after the Games. Buildings would be an
average of eight storeys, with the maximum height
not exceeding 11-12 storeys. The bid committee
proposes to construct a second temporary lift in
each apartment block to address the operational
issue of high-rise buildings and ensure minimal
delays for residents.
The Olympic Village would cover 45 hectares. The
furthest walking distance within the village would
be 800 metres.
Following the Olympic Games, the Olympic Village
would become a revitalised quarter of Paris
providing a new residential district, office, leisure,
commercial, community and educational facilities.
The Polyclinic would remain as a permanent health
centre specialising in promoting physical activity.
The city of Paris would be the authority responsible
for the construction of the Olympic Village. One
of the city’s semi-public companies, which includes
the most important public financial institute in
France, would lead the project. La Rochelle
metropolitan authorities would be responsible for
constructing the ancillary village.
20
PARIS
Paris
Construction of permanent buildings in Paris would
begin in September 2008 and finish in September
2011. In La Rochelle, construction would start in
June 2008 and finish in June 2011.
Village organisation
5,600 double and 5,900 single rooms with a total
17,100 beds are planned in the Olympic Village. La
Rochelle would have a total of 661 beds (213
double and 235 single rooms). Room sizes and raw
floor space would be in accordance with IOC
requirements. Additional officials in Paris would be
accommodated in six hotels (810 rooms) in close
proximity to the Olympic Village.
Sufficient accommodation has been guaranteed in
the four football cities.
NOC travel costs
NOC and NPC delegation travel costs are included
in the OCOG budget in accordance with IOC
requirements. A further allowance of 15% of each
delegation’s travel costs would be provided for
transporting team equipment to the Olympic
Games. For the Paralympic Games an equipment
allowance of 20% would be provided.
Additional comments
In response to concerns over the distance between
the Olympic Village and the rowing venue, the bid
committee confirmed that day accommodation
would be provided for rowing and canoe kayak
athletes. Accommodation could be available in 16
local hotels for athletes wishing to stay closer to
their competition venue the cost of which would
have to be borne by the NOC delegations.
The concept and location of the Olympic Village in
relation to the two main competition clusters are
good. In order to alleviate any possible concerns
over noise and security due to the close proximity
of the village to a railway line, the bid committee
plans to build a platform to cover these railway
tracks and to construct high-rise office and
residential buildings, which would remain vacant
during the Games, to act as a noise and security
buffer. The Commission feels that these measures,
necessary for the welfare of village residents, have
been well thought out.
21
MEDICAL SERVICES
The French public health care system is very
efficient and would provide good health care
during the Olympic Games.
Olympic health care
Medical support would be available at all
competition and training venues. 24-hour medical
care would also be provided free of charge at the
Olympic Village and in IOC hotels.
Three out of 35 existing hospitals in Paris have
been identified as Olympic hospitals. Necessary
emergency and other care would also be provided.
Paris confirmed that team doctors would need to
register with the Medical Order in France to be
authorised to practice and write prescriptions in
France for their own NOC delegation at Games-time.
The bid committee also confirmed that special
accident insurance would be taken out by OCOG
to cover all ticketed spectators, including
repatriation costs, if needed.
No duties would be applied to medical equipment
that would be exported after the Games.
SECURITY
The French government has guaranteed that it
would take overall responsibility for security during
the preparation and staging of the Olympic and
Paralympic Games. It has established a detailed
budget to support all security efforts and
guarantees that it would finance all security costs
with the exception of in-venue security which
would be the responsibility of the OCOG with a
budget of USD 89.5 million.
Command structure
The central authority for running Games security
would be the Minister of the Interior.
An Olympic Security Organisation responsible for
strategic planning and operations would be
formed to represent the interests of all parties. It
would be the single management structure for the
Olympic Games.
The “Olympic Law” to be passed after the election
of the Host City would give the Paris “Préfet de
Police” special power outside his normal sphere of
activity to control all Olympic Games security and
transport operations.
Safety and security personnel
Doping control
The French government has signed the
Copenhagen Declaration and the NOC has adopted
the WADA code.
The Paris WADA-accredited laboratory would be
used during the Olympic Games. Equine testing
would be carried out at the FEI-accredited National
Federation of Racing Associations laboratory.
Whilst most of the personnel would be drawn from
the Paris region (including civil and military police,
private security services and the military),
reinforcement would be provided from national
reserve forces. The security forces and emergency
personnel are highly equipped, technologically
advanced, well trained and sufficient in number.
They would be capable of ensuring safe and
peaceful Games.
22
PARIS
Paris
ACCOMMODATION
Experience
France formed part of the seven-nation Olympic
Security Advisory Group which provided support
and training to the Greek authorities in the lead-up
to the Athens 2004 Olympic Games.
The French police has a great deal of experience in
providing security for sports and other international
events. Many such events have been held at the
existing proposed venues.
General
Letters of guarantee have been received for
approximately 52,190 rooms.
Paris has more than sufficient hotel rooms available
(over 140,000 within a 50 km radius of the Olympic
Village) to accommodate the needs of the IOC and
visitors during the Olympic Games. In addition, the
number of visitors is traditionally lower during this
period of the year.
The accommodation plan is well developed and
takes into account the needs of the different client
groups in all hotel categories grouped into various
hotel pools around the venues in the north, west
and centre of the city. At the same time, the plan
addresses transport issues in these pools.
The bid committee has placed an emphasis on
quality control and the future OCOG would have a
department in charge of hotel reservations and
price control.
Room rates
Sufficient hotel rooms in the centre of the city have
been guaranteed for the IOC. The guaranteed 2012
prices are USD 480 for single rooms and USD 516
for double rooms, including breakfast and taxes,
but not including a reservation fee.
For the other constituent groups, prices in 2012
have been estimated by the bid committee as
follows:
-
5
4
3
2
1
star
star
star
star
star
USD
USD
USD
USD
USD
390 – 772
184 – 272
121 – 178
79 – 85
66 – 78
23
These prices have been calculated as follows: group
rate 15 July – 15 August 2004 + real average annual
rate increase until 2008 (0% in 2005 then 3.5% per
year) + inflation (2.5% from 2009 - 2012) + Olympic
premium 5% applicable in 2012. In addition, a
reservation fee of 7-12% would be charged.
No minimum stay requirement would be applied to
constituent groups with the exception of the media.
The bid committee proposes a flexible minimum
stay period of six days for the media which it
believes would assist Games-time operations.
Specifics
IFs and NOCs would have a wide choice of 3 – 5
star hotels in Paris, the majority of which are within
200 metres of the public transport system.
Technical officials would be accommodated in
single rooms in 3 – 5 star hotels near venues or in
the city centre, with the majority of hotels close to
the public transport system.
Hotel accommodation of the required quality
would be available for officials in La Rochelle
(sailing) and the football cities, and sufficient
rooms are guaranteed.
Guests of NOCs, broadcasters and sponsors would
be accommodated in 4 and 5 star hotels across the
city centre.
Accredited media would be accommodated in
approximately 200 hotels grouped into 19 pools
across the city. A media shuttle system would
connect the hotel pools to all competition venues,
the Olympic Village and the IBC/MPC. Each hotel
pool would be served by up to five shuttle pick-up
and drop-off points. All hotels would be less than
30 minutes travel from the IBC and MPC, which are
also well served by rail.
The OCOG would organise a home stay
programme for families of athletes. Details of this
programme would need to be elaborated.
Additional comments
Paris would be able to provide the number of
rooms required by the IOC and spectators. Paris
has an excellent accommodation proposal based
on detailed planning which would ensure Gamestime operational efficiency through its use of hotel
pools. The quality of hotels in all categories is
generally good.
24
PARIS
Paris
TRANSPORT
Infrastructure development and
public transport
Paris has extensive, well maintained and operated
metropolitan road and rail transport systems, handling
more than 23 million journeys every weekday.
With 12 suburban rail lines, five express regional
rail lines (RER), 17 metro lines, two tramway lines
and 770 rail stations, Paris has one of the most
comprehensive metropolitan rail transport systems
in the world.
Approximately USD 2.3 billion will be invested,
mostly on rail public transport, to further enhance
transport services to areas of Paris with
concentrations of Olympic venues.
The Northern cluster which includes the Olympic
stadium is already served by two express RER lines
and three metro lines. It will also benefit from the
extension of a metro line and the construction of
two new tramway lines, one from the north and the
other from the east.
Already served by four metro lines, two RER lines
and one tramway, the Western cluster will also
benefit from the extension of a new tramway line.
Paris Charles de Gaulle airport will be the main
gateway airport for the Olympic Games. Its
capacity will increase by 35% by 2012. This airport
is already connected to the centre of Paris by rail
and a new express rail link will be built to provide
non-stop services to the city centre.
Orly airport, which will supplement the main
gateway airport, will be renovated and expanded.
The city of Paris and Charles de Gaulle airport are
connected to all remote venue cities for football
and sailing, as well as neighbouring countries, by
high-speed rail.
Olympic transport concept and operations
The Paris 2012 Olympic transport concept is
founded on three principles:
a) Concentration of Olympic travel demands
in two main Olympic clusters with close to 67%
of all competition and non-competition
venues located less than 10 minutes from
the Olympic Village
b) Constituent group transport to be facilitated
by an Olympic lane network allowing fast and
reliable travel
c) Use of rail public transport and supplementary
shuttle buses from rail stations serving all
Olympic venues.
To offer the best possible travel conditions on the
Paris ring road and radial motorways, 170 km (85
km each way) of fully dedicated Olympic lanes
would be implemented between the Olympic
Village and Olympic venues outside Paris. To
serve the main hotel pools, inner Paris venues and
Orly airport, a supplementary system of 150 km
(75 km each way) of optimised traffic routes
would be implemented.
25
MEDIA OPERATIONS
As a result of the Olympic lane network, the
optimised traffic routes and lower August traffic
demands, average Olympic bus travel speeds
between the Olympic Village and Olympic venues
would reach 60 – 65 km/h (on motorways) offering
short travel times.
The IBC and MPC would be located in adjacent
complexes to be constructed on a vacant site, in
close proximity to the Olympic stadium.
A dedicated pedestrian bridge would be built
to provide the media with direct access to
the stadium.
Since all Olympic venues would be located near
metro and/or suburban rail stations, spectators,
accredited workers and volunteers would use
public transport to reach Olympic venues.
The proposed one-storey IBC would be 72,000 m2
and the two-storey MPC 32,000 m2. With facilities
sharing a common service area of 13,000 m2
and extra space available for the MPC if required,
there would be sufficient space for Games
operations. The size of the IBC has been increased
significantly since the submission of the
candidature file.
Free public transport would be available for
ticketed spectators and all accredited persons.
An Olympic Transport Organisation would be
created with sole responsibility for all Olympic
transport infrastructure development. Games-time
transport, traffic and security management
would be under the integrated control of the Paris
Police Prefecture, working in close cooperation
with the OCOG.
Additional comments
With further planned development in the lead-up
to 2012, Paris metropolitan road and rail transport
systems would comfortably cope with Gamestime traffic. Due to a compact Olympic venue
concept, a well-planned strategic transport scheme,
extensive Olympic lane and optimised traffic route
networks, the Commission feels confident that
Olympic and Paralympic transport requirements
would be fully met.
Guarantees were provided covering use of the land
and construction.
Accredited media would be accommodated in
approximately 200 hotels grouped into 19 pools
across the city.
Broadcasting
The Commission received assurances that suitable
arrangements would be made, in line with previous
events organised in France, to allow flexibility in
work schedules for domestic and foreign workers
engaged in broadcasting duties at the Games,
including OBS.
26
PARIS
Paris
OLYMPISM
AND CULTURE
Cultural programme
Paris has a rich cultural heritage with regard to
Olympism. For 2012, Olympism would be
developed through a diverse range of cultural
projects with three broad objectives:
- Cultural diversity and the involvement of all
regions in France
- Excellence in the arts involving local and
international artists
- Programme of events and activities in all cities
and regions staging Olympic events.
Ceremonies
The Opening and Closing Ceremonies would take
place in the existing 71,000-seat Olympic stadium.
Paris intends displaying aspects of contemporary
and historical France interwoven with Olympic
imagery for the ceremonies.
Education and information programme
An educational programme carried out in
conjunction with the Ministry of National Education
and other institutions would be introduced
between 2008 and 2012. The programme would be
focused on awareness-raising campaigns, with the
aim of spreading the values of humanism,
universality and fraternity.
Torch relay
The international leg of the torch relay would
be organised in conjunction with the IOC. The
domestic route would also include all the cities
hosting Olympic competitions in 2012.
Youth camp
Paris would invite NOC youth representatives (two
per NOC) to an Olympic youth camp, providing
free travel, accommodation and meals. Working in
conjunction with the French NOC, Paris intends
placing the youth representatives in various homes
in regions of France before assembling them in
Paris during the Games.
NEW YORK
New York
27
28
NEW YORK
New York
OLYMPIC GAMES
CONCEPT AND
LEGACY
Dates of the Olympic Games
New York proposes Friday 27 July to Sunday 12
August as the period of the Olympic Games, based
on the favourable climate, lower levels of traffic,
lower public transport demand and increased hotel
availability at this time of year.
The Paralympic Games are well integrated into the
planning of New York 2012.
Olympic Games concept
New York proposes a predominantly inner-city
Games in the interest of enhancing the athlete
experience, with the core of major venues to be
constructed in the city centre, including the
Olympic stadium, the IBC and the MPC on the
banks of the Hudson River and the Olympic
Village along the East River.
Through the bid, New York intends to create a
legacy for sport and for the city of New York. This
is coupled with a genuine desire to host many
more international sports events in New York.
58% of athletes would compete in three designated
clusters – Olympic Square (9 sports), Olympic
Riverfront (4 sports/disciplines) and Olympic Park
(6 sports/disciplines).
The majority of venues are located
intersecting transport routes running
across the city and north-south along
River. This transport concept is referred
“Olympic X”.
The Olympic Games would lead to the upgrading
of existing venues and the construction of new
facilities which would ensure a legacy for
Olympic sports.
on two
east-west
the East
to as the
Legacy and impact
The Olympic Games would act as a catalyst to
accelerate the redevelopment of degenerated river
front areas in close proximity to the city centre,
and provide more housing, employment and
sports facilities for the residents of the five
boroughs of New York City.
Additional comments
The bid proposes a comprehensive and ambitious
three-phase promotion programme in the seven
years leading up to the Olympic Games, including
the establishment of an Olympic Sports Marketing
Council and an Olympic Institute.
29
POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC CLIMATE
AND STRUCTURE
The population of New York City is expected to
grow from 8.1 to 8.6 million by 2012.
LEGAL ASPECTS
AND GUARANTEES
Guarantees
The bid has provided all of the guarantees required
by the IOC, the majority of which are in order.
Political structure and responsibility
The United States of America (USA) is a Federal
Republic with an executive president at its head.
The legislature (Congress) consists of two houses –
the Senate and the House of Representatives. The
Constitution delegates most power and decisionmaking responsibility over services to the state
governments.
The State of New York delegates special authority
to New York City, giving it unique power and the
broadest authority over services and finance. New
York City would be the lead government authority
during the Games.
National economy
The economy is currently very stable. World Bank
statistics indicate that, in 2003, the USA had the
strongest economy in the world and a preliminary
estimate on the average annual growth rate was
2.9% with domestic price inflation at 2.3%.
Support
The bid enjoys cross-party support at national,
regional and local levels.
The guarantee delivered by Madison Square
Garden (basketball) is subject to future negotiations
regarding the commercial conditions for the use of
the venue at Games-time.
As tender and approval processes were still
ongoing during the Commission’s visit, New
York could not provide a guarantee for the use
of the Olympic Square site (Olympic stadium
and IBC).
Compulsory purchase procedures may be required
to obtain the proposed site for the Olympic Village.
These procedures could delay land acquisition,
which may impact on construction schedules.
Legislation
No major changes to legislation would be required
to host the Olympic Games. The State of New York
is committed to implementing technical changes to
clarify existing state law which would facilitate the
transportation of firearms and increase the
protection of Olympic marks.
Agreements
New York’s labour unions are united behind the
bid. In 2002, the city’s construction and hotel
unions signed no-strike pledges for all Olympicrelated projects for a ten-year period covering
Olympic preparation and delivery.
In November 2002, an agreement was signed
between the City and the State of New York to
provide government funding, facilities and other
resources for the Games.
In November 2004, two agreements were signed:
A public opinion poll commissioned by the IOC
shows the following levels of support to host the
2012 Olympic Games: 59% support in New York
City and 54% support in the USA.
- The Olympic Multiparty Agreement between the
City of New York, the State of New York, the
State of New Jersey, Nassau County and the
30
NEW YORK
New York
CUSTOMS AND
IMMIGRATION
FORMALITIES
United States Olympic Committee (USOC), which
sets out the major responsibilities of all parties
involved. It also describes the composition of the
OCOG Board of Directors.
- The Olympic City Services Agreement between
the city and the bid committee sets out the
provision of city services necessary for the
Games.
The Commission believes that having such
agreements in place before the election of the Host
City is a positive factor in so far as they set out the
framework for the planning and organisation of the
Games, thus facilitating the transition to and
formation of the OCOG.
OCOG structure
The OCOG would be a private, not-for-profit, taxexempt organisation. All of the parties involved
(New York City, New York State, the State of
New Jersey, Nassau County and USOC) would be
represented on the OCOG Board.
A detailed transition plan has been developed and
agreed through the Olympic Multiparty Agreement.
Discussions have taken place with New York
financial institutions about providing credit facilities
to cover projected cash flow in the first years of
operation. Further discussion would begin
immediately after the election of the Host City. The
Chief Executive Officer of the bid would be the
chair of the OCOG board.
Entry to the country
The Olympic identity and accreditation card would
serve as official access to the country, in
accordance with IOC requirements.
Work permits and importation of goods
The Commission received assurances from
members of the US Congress regarding their
willingness to introduce legislation, as was the case
for the Atlanta and Salt Lake City Olympic Games,
to provide work permits free of any duties or taxes
and to provide exemptions from customs duties on
goods and equipment required for the Games.
31
ENVIRONMENT AND
METEOROLOGY
Plans and actions
The OCOG would implement a comprehensive
Environment Management System designed to
meet the international management standard
ISO 14001.
The OCOG would be responsible for ensuring
that environmental considerations are integrated
into all Olympic operations. There would be a
strong emphasis on innovation and technology,
urban legacy, the use of public transport
systems by spectators and clean or low-emission
Olympic vehicles.
would comply with new ozone measure limits by
2010. The USA government has not ratified the
Kyoto Protocol on greenhouse gas emissions.
The quality of water at the sailing venue appears to
be satisfactory. The proposed environmental
restoration of the site for rowing should ensure that
water quality would be satisfactory. The swim leg
of the triathlon would be in the Central Park
reservoir which prior, to the 2012 Games, would be
drained and refilled with water from aqueducts
providing drinking water.
Meteorology
A feature of the Olympic-related urban renewal
plan is the creation of a 68-hectare lake and
wetland water reserve at the rowing/canoe kayak
flatwater venue through the linking and cleaning of
two degraded artificial water bodies.
USD 51.3 million of the OCOG budget are allocated
to environmental planning and remediation, of
which USD 50.9 million are for remediation.
USD 125 million of the non-OCOG budget are
allocated to environmental remediation required
at venues.
Air and water quality
New York’s air quality levels for the proposed
period of the Games are generally within World
Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines but levels
of the pollutant ozone, while diminishing, remain a
problem, particularly in summer. However, the City
and State of New York have strict regulations in
place regarding air pollution and emissions from
vehicles and industry and the Commission received
assurances that actions already in place would
ensure that air quality in all Olympic Games areas
Average temperatures (according to figures provided,
28ºC at 3 p.m.) and humidity levels at proposed
Games-time are satisfactory, as are average wind
speeds at most outdoor venues, although there is a
lack of long-term venue-specific wind data,
particularly for the new sailing venue. There is an
average of five precipitation days in New York at
proposed Games-time.
Additional comments
All Olympic venues would be subject to
environmental impact studies and assessments and
all construction would be certified under the
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
standard, with traditional and innovative
technologies incorporated into venue designs.
New York’s urban renewal programme and park
development plans are significant and encompass
several proposed Olympic venues. Although these
are not all Games-dependent, Olympic Games in
New York would accelerate many actions and leave
additional positive environmental and sustainable
development legacies for the city.
32
NEW YORK
New York
FINANCE
OCOG budget
New York has proposed a balanced OCOG budget,
with revenue and expenditure at approximately
USD 3 billion. This includes capital investments of
USD 276.6 million for sports facilities.
Contributions from the IOC and TOP sponsors
amount to 29% of total revenue. Revenue from
local sponsors, official suppliers, ticket sales, and
licensing totals USD 1.8 billion or 58% of revenue.
Major expenditure items are sports venue
operations amounting to USD 608.5 million
or 19.7% of expenditure, technology at
USD 448 million (14.5%), Games workforce at
USD 429 million (13.9%), administration at
USD 257 million (8.3%) and transport at
USD 189 million (6.1%).
Non-OCOG budget
The non-OCOG budget amounts to USD 7.6 billion,
including USD 2.4 billion for roads and railways,
USD 2.7 billion for competition venues and
USD 1.6 billion for the Olympic Village. The City
and State of New York confirmed that, irrespective
of the Games, all capital investments would go
ahead with the exception of USD 46.9 million for
the bridge over the Olympic regatta course, which
would be Games-dependent.
Financial guarantees
The OCOG budget includes a general contingency
fund of USD 200 million as well as additional
contingency for each construction project totalling
USD 42 million. The City and State of New York
have provided a USD 250 million shortfall
guarantee for the Games. The state and city
governments have also agreed to provide all
venues owned by them free of charge for the
Olympic Games.
The bid committee considers that the total
contingency of USD 492 million should be
sufficient to cover any shortfalls.
Additional comments
The budget has been prepared professionally with
a great amount of detail. Assumptions are well
supported and documented. The budget appears to
be reasonable and achievable.
33
MARKETING
Joint Marketing Programme
New York and USOC have signed a joint marketing
agreement, the content of which does not fully
comply with the standard form Joint Marketing
Programme Agreement provided by the IOC.
Billboards and advertising
Guarantees have been secured for all outdoor
advertising sites with the exception of 5% in the
City of New York. The formula included in the
binding contracts with advertisers to calculate rates
for outdoor signage sites includes a 20% premium
for 2012 over and above the rate of inflation.
Rights protection
The Mayor of New York has signed an executive
order to establish the Mayor’s Enforcement Board
on Olympic Brand Protection. This Board would
coordinate the various government agencies
empowered to prevent ambush marketing and
illegal street vending during the Games.
Ticketing
New York’s ticket pricing policy is based on
attaining full stadia, with a large sports-loving
population living within easy travel distance of the
city. The bid has undertaken to find a mechanism
to distribute up to 250,000 free tickets (2.6% of
total number of tickets available) to the families of
athletes and school children for a variety of
Olympic events. It would also rely on established
ticket resale methods at lower prices on the day
of the event. Ticketing revenue estimates are
based on a sales rate of 81% for the Olympic
Games and 68% for the Paralympic Games,
with revenues amounting to USD 852 million and
USD 28.5 million respectively. Based on past
experience and in comparison with sports ticket
pricing in New York, these revenue targets are
considered achievable.
Local sponsorship and licensing
There is a very strong tradition of sponsorship
and licensing in the New York and USA markets.
The bid has set targets for local sponsorship at
USD 822 million and for licensed merchandise at
USD 103 million. A further USD 14 million is
projected from coin and philately programmes.
Additional comments
Given the vast market and enormous corporate
presence in New York, the marketing plan and
revenue targets are reasonable and achievable.
34
NEW YORK
New York
SPORTS AND VENUES
Overall concept
New York proposes a predominantly inner-city
Games based on three venue clusters (Olympic
Square, Olympic Riverfront and Olympic Park).
The Olympic Square, including the Olympic
stadium (5-6 km/13-15 minutes), the Olympic
Park (13-16 km/16-20 minutes) and the Olympic
Riverfront (13-14 km/17-29 minutes) clusters
comprise 19 sports/disciplines, all close to the city
centre and the Olympic Village.
The use of prominent sports venues, supplemented
by 9 new permanent venues and 5 totally
temporary venues is aimed at achieving a legacy
for sport in New York. In addition to the inner-city
competition venues, there are 10 stand-alone sports
venues on the outskirts of New York City. Football
would also be played in three cities outside New
York State.
65% of competition venues already exist, are under
construction or planned irrespective of the Games.
Travel distances/times summary
Distances/times from
Olympic Village
Number of
competition venues
0 – 10 km (10 – 23 minutes)
10 – 20 km (16 – 32 minutes)
20 – 30 km
30 – 40 km (36 – 47 minutes)
40 – 50 km (47 – 48 minutes)
50 – 100 km
100 km and over
10
11
0
5
2
0
3 (football)
The travel times quoted to competition venues
from the Olympic Village appear achievable
through the use of Olympic lanes. However, a
number of venues are not fully served by the core
network of dedicated Olympic lanes, which may
make it difficult to achieve the stated travel times.
Sailing would be based at a new facility (Gateway
Park Olympic Marina) constructed for the Olympic
Games, 39 km from the Olympic Village by road.
Ferry transport (31 km/34 minutes) would also be
available, allowing sailing competitors to live in the
Olympic Village.
Venue construction status
Under
Games dependent
Existing
construTotal
ction or
number
planned,
of sports No work
Work
venues to required required irrespective Permanent Temporary
of the
be used
Games
31
12
5
3
6
5
Construction of new venues is scheduled to begin
in 2005 and end in September 2011, with a detailed
construction timetable already in place.
New York envisages a major construction
programme for the Olympic Games. In view of the
city’s construction environment, and particularly
the ten-year moratorium on labour strikes on all
Olympic projects, this construction programme,
bearing in mind its size, complexity and cost, is
considered feasible.
35
Many of the venues (including temporary venues)
exceed IOC recommended seating capacities.
However, New York is very confident of filling the
stadia across all sports, given the very strong
demand for sports events in New York and the
USA generally.
The shared use of the track cycling venue with
badminton and temporary venues for modern
pentathlon and aquatics warrant further review.
New York 2012 proposes establishing a New York
Olympic Legacy Foundation to help maintain the
facilities built by the OCOG with USD 75 million
funding from the budget item “unused contingency
funds”.
New York proposes two multi-sport venues at
Randall’s Island and the Olympic Village Training
Centre which would benefit athletes from 14
sports/disciplines who would be able to train there.
In addition, athletes from 22 sports/disciplines
would train at their respective competition venues.
The high number of new permanent training
venues (including some competition venues)
would serve as an excellent post-Games legacy for
sports and community recreation.
Guarantees
The Commission noted that written guarantees
were received for the use of all existing venues and
proposed sites for new permanent/temporary
venues as well as for the respect of IOC
commercial requirements within these venues, with
the exception of Madison Square Garden.
Sports experience
The city has a good record of hosting major events,
having conducted 43 world-class events since 2000.
The experience gained from the 1996 and 2002
Olympic Games supplements the significant
number of international events staged in the USA
since 1995.
In cooperation with USOC and the National Sports
Federations, New York will support a development
programme for less popular Olympic sports in the
New York region.
NEW YORK
New York
36
PARALYMPIC GAMES
Budget
The revised Paralympic Games budget contains
expenditures of USD 186.4 million and revenues
of USD 99.7 million. Revenues include ticket
sales of USD 28.5 million and sponsorship of
USD 25 million. Expenditures have been adjusted
from the Candidature File to include both pro-rata
and incremental costs for the Paralympic Games.
New York 2012 estimates a total of USD 40 million
in federal and state financial support but, at the
time of the Commission’s visit, no written
guarantee had been provided from the government
to underwrite the budget.
Sport
The proposed dates for the Paralympic Games are
Friday 31 August to Tuesday 11 September.
Continuing the Olympic Games concept, venues
would be located along the “Olympic X” and all
sports would be conducted in either Olympic
competition or training venues. Two of the
proposed clusters would include 12 of the 19
sports: 7 at Olympic Square and 5 at Paralympic
Park on Randall’s Island with the remaining 7
sports at other stand-alone Olympic competition
venues.
Organising Committee
The OCOG would be responsible for the Olympic
and Paralympic Games, with an overall operational
structure of highly integrated programmes. There
would be Paralympic representation on the OCOG
Board of Directors and the managing director of
the Paralympic Games division would report
directly to the OCOG Chief Executive Officer.
USOC is the official National Paralympic Committee
in the USA with all associated rights and
responsibilities.
Logistics
The two main apartment blocks planned for the
Olympic Village would be used for the Paralympic
Village and would meet accessibility requirements.
Although the apartment buildings to be used are 40
storeys high, modelling has been conducted that
estimates reasonable wait times for elevators. Both
team delegations and International Paralympic
Sports Federations (IPSF) technical officials would
be housed in the village, while the media would
stay in hotels in Midtown Manhattan.
Over 200 km of dedicated lanes (or 109 km each
way) would be in use during the Paralympic
Games. Athletes and officials would average 17
minutes travel time to the two main clusters. All
public buses are currently accessible and more
subway stations are being upgraded to include
accessibility features.
Media and communications
The US Open tennis tournament would take place
during the same period as the Paralympic Games.
New York 2012 plans to promote the Paralympic
Games through the US Open. To redress a lack of
television coverage of the Paralympic Games in the
USA, a broadcaster has committed to providing
television coverage of the Paralympic Games,
commencing in 2010.
The same IBC/MPC facilities would be used for the
Paralympic Games, although reduced in scale to an
appropriate size.
37
OLYMPIC VILLAGE
Additional comments
New York 2012 has proposed an integrated Games
model to help ensure planning and operational
efficiency. The Olympic cultural programme is
planned to continue throughout transition and the
Paralympic Games along with a specific Paralympic
outreach programme.
The USA consistently fields strong teams at
Paralympic Games. New York plans to use this
resource and especially to draw on the experience
gained from hosting the Paralympic Winter Games
in Salt Lake City. Proposed legacies include an
increased profile for the Paralympic Movement and
new Paralympic sport opportunities.
Location/concept
The Olympic Village would be built on the banks
of the East River in the borough of Queens, in the
heart of New York City. The village is 6 km from
the proposed Olympic stadium and 25 km from
John F. Kennedy (JFK) International Airport.
There would be an ancillary village for equestrian
with 268 rooms in two hotels on Staten Island.
Village development
The Olympic Village would be a compact
waterfront settlement in the centre of the city. The
surface area of the village would be 25 hectares, of
which 10 hectares still need to be acquired.
The village would consist mainly of apartment
buildings ranging in height from 8 – 15 storeys.
These buildings would account for 65% of total
village units. In addition, two 40-storey buildings
are planned. The Commission felt that the use
of these high-rise buildings, a consequence of
inner-city Games, would require detailed planning
to avoid potential operational and logistical
challenges. New York 2012 assured the
Commission that, based on extensive planning and
technical modelling, the capacity of the elevator
system in the village buildings would ensure
minimal waiting times for residents.
The furthest walking distance within the Olympic
Village (athlete residences to amenities) would be
440 metres.
Following the Games, the Village would become a
waterfront residential community, with apartments
leased or sold in the private housing market.
Olympic amenities would be transformed into new
community facilities.
38
NEW YORK
New York
The Queens West Development Corporation, a
state corporation, would supervise the design and
construction of the Olympic Village. One or more
private developers would be selected through a
competitive tender process to build and finance the
structures required for the village. During the
Commission’s visit, five developers confirmed their
interest in participating in a tender for the
construction of the village, and similarly, five banks
confirmed their willingness to finance the project.
Construction of permanent buildings would begin
in June 2008 and end in January 2012.
Village organisation
A total of 8,550 double rooms would be provided
with 17,100 beds for athletes and officials. Room
sizes and raw floor space would exceed IOC
requirements due to the nature of the post-Games
use of the residential buildings.
NOC extra officials would be accommodated in an
apartment block adjacent to the village.
Athletes taking part in the football competitions
would be accommodated in hotels. The Commission
received a commitment that the level of services
would be the same as in the Olympic Village.
A pier would be constructed to provide ferry
transport for athletes between the Olympic Village
and the sailing venue.
NOC travel costs
NOC and NPC delegation travel costs are included
in the OCOG budget, in accordance with IOC
requirements.
Additional comment
The use of the land on the perimeter of the
Olympic
Village
would
require
careful
consideration in regard to access and security at
Games-time.
39
MEDICAL SERVICES
The USA public health care system is very efficient
and would provide good health care during the
Olympic Games.
Olympic health care
Medical support would be available at all
competition and training venues. 24-hour medical
care would also be provided free of charge at the
Olympic Village and in IOC hotels.
17 out of the 70-plus existing New York hospitals,
including specialised services, would be available
to athletes, IFs, NOCs and the IOC.
Detailed response plans are in place and would be
coordinated through New York’s Office of
Emergency Management, using all existing
emergency services.
New York confirmed that team doctors would be
authorised to practice and write prescriptions in the
USA for their own NOC delegation at Games-time.
No duties would be applied to medical equipment
that would be exported after the Games.
Doping control
The USA has signed the Copenhagen Declaration
and USOC has also adopted the WADA code.
A new anti-doping laboratory would be set up and
accredited in New York and remain as a postGames legacy, in addition to the WADA-accredited
laboratory in Los Angeles and the laboratory being
established in Salt Lake City. Equine testing would
be carried out at the FEI-accredited US Equestrian
Drug Testing and Research laboratory.
SECURITY
The USA government stated it would designate the
Olympic Games as a National Special Security
Event, and, as such, guaranteed that it would take
overall responsibility for security for the Olympic
Games. It has also guaranteed to cover all security
costs over and above areas of OCOG responsibility.
The OCOG budget contains USD 101 million
for security (USD 9.4 million for security services,
USD 14.5 million for security equipment and
USD 77 million for city services contracts).
Command structure
The New York Police Department (NYPD) would
be the lead agency for local security, planning and
implementation of all Olympic security and, as a
National Special Security Event, the US Secret
Service would coordinate US government support.
The NYPD would nominate a Director of Olympic
Security who would also act as OCOG Director of
Security, providing a single point of contact.
The NYPD would be responsible for all security
coordination, as well as strategic and operational
planning.
Safety and security personnel
Whilst most of the personnel required for Games
security would be drawn from the NYPD, the
armed forces and police forces from other US
regions and private security would also be called
upon. Law enforcement personnel are well trained,
equipped and technologically advanced and would
be capable of providing the necessary response to
ensure safe and peaceful Games.
40
NEW YORK
New York
ACCOMMODATION
Experience
The USA formed part of the seven-nation Olympic
Security Advisory Group which provided support
and training to the Greek authorities in the lead-up
to the Athens 2004 Olympic Games.
New York has the experience to cover potential
security risks, having hosted a number of sports,
international and designated National Special
Security events. In addition, the USA’s experience
includes hosting the 1996 and 2002 Olympic
Games.
Letters of guarantee have been received for
approximately 45,150 rooms.
The current hotel capacity in New York of
approximately 123,000 hotel rooms within a 50 km
radius of the city centre, far exceeds IOC
requirements. As a result, there would be more
than sufficient hotel capacity for Olympic visitors,
in addition to New York’s normal tourist trade.
There are 57,000 hotel rooms within a 2.5 km
radius of the centre of New York City (Manhattan),
which incorporates Olympic Square, the proposed
location for 9 sports, including the Olympic
stadium.
Room rates
Two 5 star quality hotels have been guaranteed for
the IOC in the heart of the city at USD 449 (2012
price) for a standard, deluxe or executive room,
including breakfast and taxes. To guarantee this
price, a provision has been made in the OCOG
budget.
For the other constituent groups, the room rate
would be calculated as follows: the actual average
room rate during the months of July and August
of 2007-2009 as certified by the hotels’ auditors +
inflation (2.5% from 2010-2012) + 5% Olympic
premium compounded annually from 2010 – 2012.
In addition, a 10% administration fee would also be
added by the OCOG who would handle bookings
for all guaranteed hotels.
41
TRANSPORT
The guaranteed hotels have agreed to a minimum
stay period of 5-6 days, controlled by the OCOG,
with flexibility in regard to the start and finish of
the block periods.
Specifics
IFs and NOCs would have a wide choice of 3 – 5
star hotels in New York City. Technical officials
would be accommodated in single hotel rooms in
close proximity to their venues, or in the city
centre. Hotel accommodation would be provided
for sailing officials close to the proposed sailing
centre. Sufficient hotel rooms for football officials
have been guaranteed.
Guests of NOCs, broadcasters and sponsors would
be accommodated in 4 or 5 star quality hotels
across the city centre.
Media would be accommodated in hotels in close
proximity to the IBC and MPC. Lower cost university
accommodation would also be available.
The OCOG would organise a free home stay
programme for athletes’ families.
Additional comments
New York has a well-developed accommodation
plan and would be able to provide the number of
rooms required by the IOC and spectators. The
quality of hotels of all levels is generally good.
Infrastructure development and
public transport
The city has a comprehensive metropolitan
transport network moving nearly 9 million people
every weekday. Major transport development and
renovation investments have been made during the
last two decades to modernise and expand rail and
road systems.
New transport projects planned for the Olympic
Games are a 2 km subway extension from Time
Square to Olympic Square, a 4 km suburban rail
link to Meadowlands (football and volleyball) in
New Jersey, new ferry landings and an expanded
intelligent transport system centre.
New York’s three major airports – JFK, Newark
Liberty and La Guardia - provide some of the
world’s highest capacity for domestic and
international flights.
Olympic transport concept and operations
New York’s Olympic transport concept is based on
three principles:
a) Grouping of Olympic venues and Olympic
travel demands on the four branches of
the proposed “Olympic X” system with the
Olympic Village at its centre
b) Constituent group transport to be facilitated
by an Olympic lane network allowing faster
travel movements
c) Public transport (rail and supplementary buses)
serving all Olympic venues.
To overcome road congestion with regard to access
to the city centre (Manhattan), a 260 km Olympic
Priority Route Network (520 km if both directions
are taken into consideration) on motorways and
42
NEW YORK
New York
major arterial streets would provide significantly
improved travel conditions between the Olympic
Village and almost all Olympic venues. Of these
lanes, a core system of fully dedicated Olympic lanes
of 136 km (68 km each way) would be implemented.
New York transport authorities have the power to
enforce traffic management measures such as the
proper use of dedicated lanes. As a result of the
dedicated Olympic lanes and lower traffic
demands in August, Olympic travel speeds
between the Olympic Village and Olympic venues
would average 30-35 km/h for Olympic bus travel
on arterial streets and 50-55 km/h on expressways
and motorways.
Nearly all Olympic venues would be located near
a subway or suburban rail station, enabling
spectators, workers and volunteers to use New
York’s public transport system to travel to
Olympic venues.
Olympic event ticket holders would be provided
with a free 24-hour Metro Card. In addition, all
accredited persons would enjoy free public transport.
An Olympic Transport Service, coordinated by
OCOG, would manage the Olympic bus and ferry
systems and Olympic vehicle fleet. During the
Games, the NYPD would supervise Games
transport operations from the Command, Control
and Communication Centre in conjunction with the
Olympic Transport Service.
Additional comments
Due to considerable transport development and
renovation investments made during the last two
decades, limited Olympic transport investments
are required. The Commission believes New York
would meet Olympic and Paralympic Games
transport requirements in 2012 with the
implementation of the extensive system of
Olympic lanes for the Games.
43
MEDIA OPERATIONS
The IBC and MPC would be located in facilities
adjacent to the proposed Olympic stadium.
The IBC would be in a new 41-storey building
(93,000 m2) to be built as part of the proposed
Olympic Square development. The 41,000 m2 MPC
would be housed on two levels of the existing
Javits Convention Centre.
The Commission noted that developers had
confirmed their interest in participating in a tender
for the construction of the IBC, and two banks
confirmed their willingness to finance the project.
Whilst the bid committee stated that high-rise
broadcasting facilities are common in New York,
experience at previous Olympic Games would
suggest that a high-rise IBC could pose some
operational challenges.
The IBC and MPC would have separate transport
pick-up and drop-off points, but a dedicated secure
route would link the two buildings. Transport
for media would comprise shuttles using the
Olympic Priority Network and dedicated ferries
to selected venues.
Accredited media would be accommodated in
hotels in close proximity to the IBC and MPC.
Lower cost university accommodation (with the
same level of services) would also be available.
Broadcasting
With regard to labour laws, the Commission
received assurances that there would be flexibility
for the work schedules of foreign and domestic
employees of broadcasters including OBS.
OLYMPISM
AND CULTURE
Cultural programme
New York plans to organise a three-year
programme of cultural activities commencing
immediately after the 2010 Olympic Winter Games.
There would be celebrations of the world’s
cultures, weekend festivals highlighting the ethnic
diversity of the city and a focus on New York’s
roots as a “water city”. The programme would
continue throughout the transition period and the
Paralympic Games.
Ceremonies
For the Opening Ceremony, New York proposes a
parade of tall ships between the Olympic Village
and the proposed 78,000-seat Olympic stadium,
attracting spectator support along the riverbanks.
Athletes would parade along Broadway prior to
entering the Olympic stadium. This proposal would
require discussion with the IOC.
Education and information programme
New York would develop, in partnership with the
city’s Department of Education, Olympic education
initiatives encompassing 1.1 million students. The
wide range of activities would include inter-school
competitions on or around Olympic days and annual
seminars with national and international institutions
and programmes on urban revitalisation. The OCOG
would seek to partner the United Nations,
headquartered in New York, in linking local youth
with their peers around the world through
programmes celebrating the Olympic values of fair
play and friendship.
44
NEW YORK
New York
Torch relay
New York plans to partner leading environmental
organisations to raise awareness about the need to
protect and conserve water as a precious resource
for the international leg of the torch relay.
Youth camp
The OCOG would hold a youth camp for students
from all NOCs competing in the 2012 Olympic
Games. All expenses, including the travel of NOC
participants (two per NOC), would be borne by
the OCOG.
MOSCOW
Moscow
45
46
MOSCOW
Moscow
OLYMPIC GAMES
CONCEPT AND
LEGACY
Dates of the Olympic Games
Moscow proposes Saturday 14 July to Sunday 29
July as the period for the Olympic Games, based
on the best climatic conditions and reduced
transport demands in the city due to the holiday
period at this time.
Olympic Games concept
Moscow seeks to further build on the legacies of
the 1980 Olympic Games which have served the
needs of the city very well by supporting the
growth of sports and the continued success of
Russian athletes.
The City Development Master Plan for the period
up to 2020 would be enhanced and accelerated
with the staging of the 2012 Olympic Games
particularly through the increased housing
capacity provided by the proposed Olympic and
media villages.
Legacy and impact
The Olympic Games would ensure significant
upgrading of 23 existing international standard
sports venues, the construction of 7 new venues,
including tennis, gymnastics and canoe kayak
slalom, as well as new high quality housing and
hotels, improved infrastructure and major
improvements to the accessibility of the city for
persons with a disability.
All competition venues would be dedicated to
sport in their post-Games use and would be
managed long term by the city to meet venue
operational costs.
Additional comments
Moscow 2012 aims to have a global promotional
campaign over the seven years leading up to the
Olympic Games, highlighting the 2012 Olympic
Games and Russia as a tourist destination.
The “Olympic River” concept embraces the
majority of the venues as well as the Olympic
Village, IBC and MPC which are located on or near
the Moscow River. The Olympic Games would be
the catalyst to accelerate the development of large
areas of currently degenerated but valuable land.
The Olympic Games Study Commission’s
recommendations have encouraged Moscow to
draw on the legacy of the 1980 Olympic Games in
establishing its venue plan by using 23 existing and
well-maintained venues and a high percentage of
existing training venues.
With all sports competition venues in the city of
Moscow and one village amply accommodating all
athletes including the football teams, Moscow
proposes a memorable experience for all athletes
with minimal travel times to venues. This would
occur in a country which is establishing itself as the
“New Russia”.
All venues are well served by the public transport
network, which is continually being expanded and
upgraded.
47
POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC CLIMATE
AND STRUCTURE
Moscow’s population is expected to decrease from
10.4 to 9.9 million by 2012, however, at the same
time, the population on the outskirts of Moscow is
increasing rapidly.
Political structure and responsibility
Russia is a Federal Democracy with an Executive
President who is elected by universal suffrage for
a term of four years. The Chairman of the
government (Prime Minister) is nominated by the
President with the consent of the State Duma
which is also elected by universal suffrage for a
four-year term.
Moscow enjoys a special federal status as an
autonomous entity of the Russian Federation. It has
its own charter and legislature. Moscow is
empowered to provide all the essential resources
and obligations for staging the Games. The deputy
Mayor chairs the bid.
National economy
The hyperinflation of the 1990s has now been
stabilised and the government expects to reduce
the inflation rate to 8.5% by the end of 2005. Russia
has a large currency reserve. World Bank statistics
indicate that, in 2003, Russia had the 16th largest
economy in the world and a preliminary estimate
on the average annual growth rate was 7.3% with
domestic price inflation at 13.7%.
Support
The two levels of government (federal and city) are
fully involved in the preparation of the bid. All the
political parties in the State Duma fully support the
staging of the Games. The Labour Unions also
support the Games as was demonstrated in a
guarantee received during the Commission’s visit.
A public opinion poll commissioned by the IOC
shows the following levels of support to host the
2012 Olympic Games: 77% support in Moscow and
76% support throughout Russia.
48
MOSCOW
Moscow
LEGAL ASPECTS
AND GUARANTEES
CUSTOMS AND
IMMIGRATION
FORMALITIES
Guarantees
Entry to the country
The bid committee has provided the guarantees
required by the IOC, with the exception of those
concerning the protection of Olympic marks and
the words “Moscow 2012”. The guarantees signed
by the Federal Government state that the
government would “take appropriate measures” to
protect them. The registration of Olympic marks
was not provided to the Commission in English.
Legislation
During the visit, the Commission received
information concerning a proposed new law called
“Olympic Games 2012”, the first draft of which has
been presented to the State Duma for its
consideration. This law would facilitate the
organisation of the Games. A list of the main items
contained in this law was given to the Commission
during its visit.
OCOG structure
The future OCOG would be a not-for-profit
institution which would enjoy the status of an
autonomous legal entity. The OCOG would be taxexempt. The different tiers of government, the
Russian Olympic Committee and the Russian
Paralympic Committee would be represented on
the OCOG executive body. The chairman would be
the Mayor of Moscow.
The Olympic identity and accreditation card would
serve as official access to the country in accordance
with IOC requirements.
Work permits
The Federal government confirmed that a
programme would be introduced so that persons
carrying out Olympic-related work in Russia one
year before the Games would not require work
permits. Most workers would, however, require a
Russian visa and these would be issued within
three to four weeks.
During the visit, the Commission received
assurances that the workers referred to above
would not be subject to Russian taxes and that
these exemptions would be included in the
“Olympic Games 2012” law.
Importation of goods
The temporary importation of goods required for
the Olympic Games into Russia would be
authorised free of any duties.
As regards the importation of food during the
Olympic Games, a customs declaration would be
required and the food would have to be consumed
or exported after the Games.
49
ENVIRONMENT AND
METEOROLOGY
Plans and actions
The Moscow OCOG would have environmental
management systems primarily based on the ISO
standards. Moscow is using the bid and Games
plan as a catalyst for accelerated environmental
measures, higher standards and new environmental
technology.
Moscow’s Olympic plans also include the
revitalisation of the upper Moscow River and the
accelerated rehabilitation of former industrial sites
into community recreation and green zones. The
city government requires a “Sanitary and Ecological
Passport” for all building materials in Moscow,
defining specific regulations including a set of
prohibited materials. These standards would apply
to all Olympic sites.
Initial environmental impact assessments have
been conducted, and the positioning of venues
is subject to standards relating to green space,
air and water quality, waste management and
biodiversity levels.
In addition to on-going city environmental
programmes, the Moscow city government has
budgeted USD 17.5 million for supplementary
Games-related environmental activities.
Air and water quality
Current levels of some air pollutants are a concern
but are improving, and assurances have been given
that by 2012 the levels of all pollutants would be
constantly within European Union (EU) and World
Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines and as such
would be satisfactory.
Motor vehicles are a major source of air pollution
in Moscow and there are specific plans to reduce
vehicle emissions and their impact.
The ratification of the Kyoto Protocol by Russia will
facilitate lower greenhouse gas emissions and
better air quality.
The Commission received assurances that water
quality at the triathlon, sailing and rowing/canoe
kayak flatwater venues would be satisfactory.
Meteorology
Average temperatures in Moscow at proposed
Games-time are mild (according to figures
provided, 20.4ºC at 3 p.m.). During the proposed
period of the Games, Moscow has an average of 8
precipitation days, with a high average volume of
rain. Contingency planning within the competition
schedule would be required. Average wind speeds
appear to be low at all outdoor venues.
Additional comments
The OCOG environmental guidelines would be
integrated into contracts with sponsors and
suppliers. Legacies from a Moscow Games would
include improved waste disposal and recycling,
creation of some new green areas and clean
energy public transport. However, the amount
of land to be rehabilitated as a direct result of
a Moscow Olympic Games was difficult to
determine, as were the specific improvements in
standards and technology.
50
MOSCOW
Moscow
FINANCE
OCOG budget
Moscow 2012 has a budget of USD 1.84 billion with
a surplus of USD 6 million.
Contributions from the IOC and TOP sponsors
amount to 48.9% of revenue. The local marketing
programme including domestic sponsorship,
official suppliers and licensing amounts to
USD 725 million or 39.4% of revenue. The city has
planned a lottery with USD 7 million revenue for
the OCOG. Subsidies from the city government
were increased to USD 147 million during the
Commission’s visit. Together with the Federal
Government contribution of USD 24 million,
subsidies would total USD 171 million or 9.3%
of revenue.
Major expenditure items are technology at
USD 451 million (24.6% of expenditure), Games
workforce at USD 98 million (5.3%) and
administration at USD 129 million (7%).
The budgeted amount of USD 280 million for
sports venue operations (15.2% of expenditure),
including overlay, appears to be on the low side in
comparison to previous Olympic Games.
No capital investment is included in the OCOG
budget, in accordance with IOC guidelines.
Non OCOG budget
The Moscow city government guarantees the nonOCOG budget of USD 10 billion which includes
construction and renovation of all venues. Of this,
USD 7.78 billion is for transport infrastructure and
USD 1.12 billion is for competition venues.
Financial guarantees
The city government guarantees to cover any
budget shortfall. The Federal Government also
gave an assurance that it would act as a final
guarantor for Games expenditure in the event of
the city being unable to fund any shortfall. The
Moscow city government also guarantees an
additional operating budget for transport, security,
health services and environmental work amounting
to USD 189 million.
Additional comments
The budgeting process follows IOC guidelines.
Whilst low in sports venue operations, the budget
appears to be reasonable and achievable.
51
MARKETING
Joint Marketing Programme
The Joint Marketing Programme Agreement signed
by Moscow and the Russian Olympic Committee
contains certain financial aspects which require
further clarification.
Local sponsorship and licensing
Projected revenues are USD 450 million (24.4% of
revenue) for local sponsorship, USD 75 million
(4%) for official suppliers and USD 50 million
(2.7%) for licensing, coins and philately
programmes.
Billboards and advertising
The city guarantees full control of any advertising
or commercial activity in, above or around Olympic
venues. Guarantees from outdoor advertising site
owners have been received but no details have
been provided regarding pricing.
Rights protection
Existing federal legislation prohibits unfair
competition and ambush marketing and protects
intellectual property rights. The city guarantees that
all legal measures necessary to effectively reduce
and impose sanctions on ambush marketing,
eliminate street vending and control advertising
space and airspace would be taken no later than 30
June 2005. The OCOG would also set up a
dedicated ambush marketing response team.
Ticketing
Moscow has estimated ticket sales rates of 82% for
the Olympic Games and 50% for the Paralympic
Games, with revenues of USD 150 million and
USD 3.5 million respectively. The city indicated
that it has a great deal of experience in various
methods of ticket sales and there is a high demand
from the 10.4 million inhabitants of Moscow. The
city has also introduced a new distribution system
over the Internet that would provide better
services and generate higher demand. It would use
special promotion for less popular events to
ensure full stadia.
Additional comments
Given the fast developing market economy and the
increasing affluence and purchasing power of
Muscovites, the bid committee assured the
Commission that the sponsorship target and
marketing efforts would be successful. The
marketing programme proposed by Moscow is
achievable.
52
MOSCOW
Moscow
SPORTS AND VENUES
Overall concept
Travel distances/times summary
Building on the legacy of the 1980 Olympic Games,
the Moscow River, running through the centre of
the city, would be the focal point for the Olympic
Village and the main competition clusters:
Cluster
Number of
sports/
disciplines
Distance
from
Olympic
Village
Travel time
from
Olympic
Village
Luzhniki Olympic
Complex
9
6 km
7 minutes
Krylatskoye Sports
Complex
9
12 km
14 minutes
Tushino Sports
Complex
6
14 km
17 minutes
CSKA Sports
Complex
4
7 km
8 minutes
Olympiysky
Sports Complex
4
10 km
12 minutes
The Luzhniki Olympic Complex was the main
sports arena for the 1980 Olympic Games and
includes the recently renovated Olympic stadium.
The Tushino Sports Complex would be constructed
on the site of a former airfield.
Moscow places particular emphasis on the
development of its sports infrastructure to benefit
both elite and community sport.
79% of competition venues needed for the Games
already exist, are under construction or are planned
irrespective of the Games.
All competitions would take place in Moscow,
including football, with the furthest venue from the
Olympic Village being sailing at 49 km (59 minutes).
Distances/times from
Olympic Village
0 – 10 km (7 – 12 mins)
10 – 20 km (14 – 22 mins)
20 – 30 km (30 mins)
30 – 40 km
40 – 50 km (59 mins)
50 – 100 km
100 km and over
Number of
competition venues
16
16
1
0
1
0
0
The travel times quoted from the Olympic Village
to competition venues, through the use of Olympic
lanes, appear achievable, with the exception of
sailing.
Venue construction status
Under
Games dependent
Existing
construTotal
ction or
number
planned,
of sports No work
Work
venues to required required irrespective Permanent Temporary
of the
be used
Games
34
0
23
4
4*
4
* BMX is a new permanent venue within the existing mountain
bike venue and is therefore not counted in the total
The tennis, gymnastics and 2 football venues are
under construction and are all due to be completed
by July 2007 at the latest.
Moscow proposes major upgrading of 23 existing,
well-maintained venues, including 11 built for the
1980 Olympic Games.
53
Four temporary venues (archery, baseball, shooting
and beach volleyball) would be built by the city
government.
All construction would be managed by the Moscow
city government which would seek to use a mix of
private investment and public funding wherever
possible to meet the capital cost of each project.
Moscow has budgeted USD 280 million to cover all
venue-related operational costs and overlay, which
would appear low in comparison to previous
Olympic Games experience.
All permanent works are scheduled to be
completed by January 2012 and temporary works
by May 2012.
Athletes from 26 sports/disciplines would be able
to train at their respective competition venues, as
well as at a number of other dedicated training
venues.
Guarantees
The Commission noted that written guarantees
were received for the use of all existing venues and
proposed sites for new permanent/temporary
venues as well as for the respect of IOC
commercial requirements within these venues.
Sports experience
Moscow has good experience in organising World
and European Sports events in most Olympic sports
over the past 10 years.
Additional comments
Whilst Moscow has good sports experience and a
high number of existing competition venues, the
bid committee has not presented detailed design
and operational plans or a detailed construction
schedule.
MOSCOW
Moscow
54
PARALYMPIC GAMES
Budget
The budget for the Paralympic Games is separate
from the OCOG budget and projected to be
USD 119 million. The majority of the Paralympic
Games financing (73%) comes from a contribution
from the OCOG totalling USD 87 million, while a
USD 9 million contribution is made by the city
of Moscow. Revenue includes sponsorship of
USD 5.5 million and ticket sales of USD 3.5 million.
Expenditures are based solely on incremental costs
for the Paralympic Games but the marketing rights
payment to the IPC is not included in the
Paralympic budget. Any shortfall in the budget
would be covered by the city of Moscow.
Sport
The proposed dates for the Paralympic Games are
Saturday 11 August to Wednesday 22 August,
resulting in a short transition time between the
Olympic and Paralympic Games of 12 days.
Moscow 2012 stated that it would adjust the
schedule and also increase the number of days the
Paralympic Village is open to meet technical
requirements. The Paralympic venues would be the
same as those used for the Olympic Games. The
highest concentration of sports would occur at
Luzhniki Olympic complex where 5 Paralympic
sports would be contested.
Organising Committee
A single OCOG would oversee both Olympic and
Paralympic Games with one director on the OCOG
Board of Directors responsible for the organisation
of the Paralympic Games.
Operationally, it appears that the Paralympic
Games would be relatively independent, with the
planning and delivery handled by the Paralympic
Department.
Logistics
The Paralympic Village would encompass part of
the Olympic Village which would be designed
using international accessibility standards. The
8,500-bed village would house Paralympic teams
and International Paralympic Sports Federations
(IPSF) technical officials.
Media at the Paralympic Games would be
accommodated in the media village built for the
Olympic Games.
Transport operations would remain the same as
those implemented during the Olympic Games. For
17 of the 19 sports, travel times are estimated to be
less than 20 minutes from the Paralympic Village
with distances ranging from 6 to 17 km.
Spectators would primarily use public transport
with plans to modify the fleet and metro stations to
ensure access for persons with a disability.
55
OLYMPIC VILLAGE
Media and communications
The same IBC and MPC facilities would be used for
the Paralympic Games.
Additional comments
Moscow has proposed a Paralympic Games plan
based on making maximum use of Olympic
infrastructure.
The Paralympic Movement in Russia is undergoing
significant development with increasing success at
the Paralympic Games.
It is hoped that hosting the Paralympic Games
would stimulate financial and public support for
the Paralympic Movement in Russia. The proposed
primary legacy of a Moscow Games would be one
of social change, including increased awareness,
support and accessibility for people with a
disability.
Location/concept
The Olympic Village would be built in the
northwest of the city, on the banks of the Moscow
River. It would be 6 km from the Olympic stadium,
7 km from the city centre and 32 km from the main
gateway airport (Vnukovo).
Village development
The village would consist of 15 buildings, 3 to 22
storeys high (44% would be higher than 7 storeys).
Moscow 2012 assured the Commission that there
would be a sufficient number of elevators.
The Olympic Village would cover 80 hectares. The
furthest walking distance within the Olympic
Village would be 1,300 metres.
Following the Games, the village apartments would
be sold for use as private residential property. The
remaining facilities would be converted to provide
leisure, commercial and other services for private
housing.
The city government has identified private
developers interested in undertaking the village
project and has guaranteed construction.
All construction and preparation work would be
supervised by the city government department
responsible for planning policy.
Construction of permanent buildings would
commence in February 2009 and end in April 2012.
56
MOSCOW
Moscow
MEDICAL SERVICES
Village organisation
There would be 7,400 single rooms and 6,300
double rooms with a total of 20,000 beds for athletes
and officials. Room sizes and raw floor space would
be in accordance with IOC requirements.
Extra NOC officials could be accommodated in the
Olympic Village.
The Russian public health care system is efficient
and would provide good health care during the
Olympic Games.
Olympic health care
Medical support would be available at all
competition and training venues. 24-hour medical
care would also be provided free of charge at the
Olympic Village and in IOC hotels.
NOC travel costs
NOC and NPC delegation travel costs are included
in the OCOG budget in accordance with IOC
requirements.
Additional comments
Although planning lacked detail, the Commission
believes that the Moscow 2012 village concept is
feasible. The use of the land on the perimeter of
the Olympic Village would, however, require
careful consideration in regard to access and
security at Games-time.
Seven of the 138 hospitals have been identified as
Olympic hospitals. Some of these would require
renovation. Funds amounting to USD 2.3 billion
will be invested in the city’s health care system
over the next ten years.
Moscow confirmed that team doctors would be
authorised to practice and write prescriptions in
Russia for their own NOC delegation at Games-time.
No duties would be applied to medical equipment
that would be exported after the Games.
Doping control
The Russian government has signed the
Copenhagen Declaration and the NOC has adopted
the WADA code.
A WADA-accredited laboratory in Moscow is
operational. Moreover, the laboratory can carry out
equine testing and is expected to receive FEI
accreditation within the next two to three years.
57
SECURITY
The government of the Russian Federation
guarantees that it would take overall responsibility
for security during the preparation and staging of
the Olympic and Paralympic Games. The security
budget would come from three sources: the
Federal Government covering the majority of
costs, Moscow city government and USD 67 million
from the OCOG.
Command structure
Russia has a federal police system which has
responsibility over the entire Russian territory. All
security would be under the unified control of the
special Coordination Centre at the Russian
Federation’s Ministry of the Interior.
The OCOG would have a security department. No
detailed information about its specific tasks has
been provided.
Safety and security personnel
The majority of personnel would be drawn from
the city of Moscow police forces, and support
would be provided by police from other regions,
the armed forces and private security. Security
forces are well trained, equipped and
technologically advanced and would be capable of
providing the necessary response to ensure safe
and peaceful Games.
Experience
Although Russia was not part of the seven-nation
advisory group for the Athens Olympic Games, it
did provide advice to the Athens OCOG.
Moscow has significant experience in providing
security at large scale sports and other international
events. Many such events have been held at the
existing proposed venues.
ACCOMMODATION
General
Approximately 17,550 rooms are currently
guaranteed by the appropriate owners in 3 to 5 star
hotels, nearly all within a 10 km radius of the city
centre. These include nearly 7,500 rooms in hotels
to be constructed. In addition, 21,000 beds would
be available in the proposed media village.
The main hotel cluster is situated in close proximity
to Moscow’s historic city centre and includes the
IOC official hotels.
Moscow’s hotel industry is managed by the
Committee on External Economic Activities of the
City Government. However, during the Olympic
Games, the OCOG would act as the body
responsible for reservations and price control.
There are currently 167 hotels in the 2 to 5 star
category with a total room capacity of 39,000
within a 50 km radius of the city centre.
The city government stated that 210 additional
hotels would be constructed by 2012.
Room rates
The IOC hotels would be situated within or in close
proximity to the city centre, 6 km from the Olympic
stadium and an average of 15 km from the majority
of competition venues. 2012 guaranteed hotel room
rates for the IOC and constituent groups would be
as follows:
5 star
4 star
3 star
*
IOC hotels
Single Double
390
450
260
320
-
Constituent groups*
Single
Double
390
450
260
320
90
120
prices taken from hotel guarantees provided during the visit
58
MOSCOW
Moscow
The formula by which the above-mentioned
constituent rates have been estimated is: 2004 room
rate + inflation (3% from 2005-2012).
The Commission notes, however, that inflation
in Russia is currently estimated at over 10%. In
addition, a USD 7–10 management fee would be
added to the room rate.
For the media staying in the media village, the
prices would be USD 260 for a single room and
USD 320 for a double room.
There would be no minimum stay period required
during the 2012 Olympic Games.
Specifics
The media village would be constructed on the
banks of the Moscow River to house 21,000
accredited media in 3 to 4 star quality single or
double rooms, in buildings 3 to 22 storeys high.
The village would have 24-hour catering services,
and other services and amenities equivalent to a
similar standard hotel. It would be linked to the
Olympic Village by a footbridge.
IF and NOC hotels are located across the city and
in close proximity to the venues.
Technical officials would be housed in single
rooms in 3 to 5 star hotels.
As all football venues are located in Moscow,
all officials would be accommodated in hotels
in the city.
Hotel accommodation for sailing officials close to
the venue has not been identified.
Guests of NOCs, broadcasters and sponsors would
be accommodated in 3 to 5 star hotels close to or
in the city centre.
The quality of hotels within each rating category
varies considerably.
Various programmes for athletes’ families are being
considered by the bid committee.
Additional comments
The candidature file and associated guarantees
provided little detail concerning Moscow’s
accommodation plan. Concerns in this regard were
partly addressed during the Commission’s visit
through the delivery of a number of additional
guarantees.
59
TRANSPORT
Infrastructure development and
public transport
Moscow’s road system is based on a radial ring
network of motorways and major urban arterial
roads.
Moscow’s metro network of 11 lines and 165
stations forms the core of its very strong public
transport system handling more than 80% of the
20 million daily travel journeys.
To cope with increasing car ownership and to
alleviate severe road congestion problems,
USD 7.8 billion are to be invested between
2003 and 2011 in a transport infrastructure
development programme, 75% for roads and 25%
for rail public transport. Of that amount,
approximately USD 1.5 billion are allocated to
transport projects directly related to the Olympic
Games.
A 63 km ring road will be completed. The western
part of this fourth ring road would provide access
to the proposed IBC/MPC and the media village.
Among the numerous metro projects, the new
Moscow city line will be extended along the
Moscow River to serve the Olympic Village.
The three Moscow airports, Sheremetievo (north),
Domodedovo (south) and Vnukovo (south west)
will be expanded to double their capacity by 2012.
The largest development will concern the smallest
airport, Vnukovo, which is proposed as the
Olympic gateway airport. This airport will be
connected to the centre of Moscow by a new
express rail link.
Olympic transport concept and operations
The Moscow 2012 Olympic transport concept is
founded on three principles:
a) Grouping of Olympic venues and Olympic
travel demands in five main Olympic clusters,
with 85% of all venues located less than
20 minutes from the Olympic Village
b) Constituent group transport to be facilitated
by an Olympic lane network
c) Metro and bus public transport serving all inner
city Olympic venues.
To overcome road congestion, an Olympic priority
network of approximately 220 km (440 km if both
directions are taken into consideration) would be
implemented between the Olympic Village, the five
Olympic venue clusters and other stand-alone
competition venues.
Out of this total, 87 km (43.5 km each way) would
be fully dedicated Olympic lanes. The police would
be responsible for converting the remaining
353 km into dedicated Olympic lanes, as required,
according to the Olympic competition schedule.
Due to the Olympic lane network and lower summer
traffic demands, average Olympic bus travel speeds
between the Olympic Village and competition
venues would reach 45-50 km/h offering reasonable
travel times to most inner-city venues.
Most competition venues would be located near
metro stations, enabling spectators, accredited
workforce and volunteers to use the Moscow
public transport system to reach Olympic venues.
Ticketed spectators and all accredited persons
would enjoy free public transport.
60
MOSCOW
Moscow
MEDIA OPERATIONS
Key responsibility for planning and implementing
the Olympic Transport Plan would rest with
the city of Moscow. The city Transport and
Telecommunications Department would manage
Games-time transport operations in conjunction
with the OCOG.
Additional comments
Moscow road and rail transport systems would
cope with the considerable Games-time traffic
pressures if the ambitious road and rail transport
infrastructure developments are carried out as
planned and if appropriate management
techniques are enforced. Due to a compact urban
Olympic venue concept and an Olympic lane
network, the Commission feels that Olympic and
Paralympic transport requirements would be met.
The IBC/MPC would be in new, single-storey
adjacent buildings to be constructed next to a
dedicated media village, 7 minutes from the
Olympic stadium.
The IBC would be 70,000 m2 and the MPC 40,000 m2,
with another 10,000 m2 of storage, dining and other
facilities. Detailed plans for the IBC and MPC had,
however, not been formulated at the time of the
Commission’s visit.
Potential private developers have been identified
by the Moscow city government for the
construction of the IBC, MPC and media village.
A dedicated 24-hour transport shuttle service
between all venues and the IBC and MPC would
serve accredited media. The location of the
21,000-bed media village within walking distance
of the IBC/MPC would reduce media transport
logistic demands.
Broadcasting
Assurances were received that foreign and
domestic workers performing Games broadcasting
duties would be able to work according to personal
contractual arrangements.
61
OLYMPISM
AND CULTURE
Cultural programme
Moscow plans to initiate an “Olympic River”
programme based on the unity of all continents
and nations through sports and rivers. The
programme would commence in 2008 with
activities beginning in one continent and
culminating in Moscow in 2012. The “Olympic
River” concept would continue along the Moscow
River during the Games, with various cultural
activities integrating sport and the arts.
Ceremonies
The Opening and Closing Ceremonies would be
held in the existing 80,000-seat Olympic stadium.
Education and information programme
Olympic education is already part of the mandatory
education system in Russia. A website would be
created on Olympism and culture so that Russian
school children and young people could exchange
ideas and views with their peers from the rest of
the world.
Torch relay
Moscow envisages a torch relay which would
incorporate the “Olympic River” concept, with the
Russian leg beginning in Vladivostock and
culminating in Moscow.
Youth camp
During the Commission’s visit, the bid committee
stated its intention to invite between 3 and 5 young
people from each NOC to a youth camp in
Moscow. All expenses would be covered by the
Moscow city government.
LONDON
London
63
64
LONDON
London
OLYMPIC GAMES
CONCEPT AND
LEGACY
Dates of the Olympic Games
London proposes Friday 27 July to Sunday 12
August as the period of the Olympic Games, based
on school and university annual summer holidays
and lower demands on public transport, roads,
hotels and student accommodation. The temperate
climate during this period would be satisfactory for
athletes and spectators.
Olympic Games concept
The Olympic Games would be a catalyst for
the re-development of the Lower Lea Valley, a
200-hectare rehabilitation and regeneration
project in East London. Along with major new
public infrastructure, this re-development would
provide long-term benefits for the residents of
London, including employment, housing,
educational and recreational opportunities and
the development of sport.
London has proposed Games based on providing
world-class facilities and services for the athletes,
and a legacy for sport and the community through
new and enhanced facilities and a greater emphasis
on sport and physical activity.
There has been significant involvement from the
British Olympic Association (BOA) and athletes
during the candidature phase. Commitments have
been made that such involvement would continue
throughout the organisation of the Games.
Legacy and impact
The bid process is providing the basis for London
and the United Kingdom (UK) government to
significantly improve the availability of sports
facilities of an international standard in London,
with construction already approved on the aquatic
centre, Velopark (track and BMX), Regents Park
softball centre and Broxbourne canoe kayak
slalom course.
Three sports halls, the water polo pool, and a
number of training venues would be re-located to
other cities in the UK after the Games.
Post-Games plans for Olympic Park include the
creation of a significant legacy project - the London
Olympic Institute, which would encompass elite
and community sport, culture, the environment,
sports science and research.
The Paralympic Games are well integrated into the
planning of London 2012.
Additional comments
Whilst the development of the Olympic Park as
part of the Lower Lea Valley regeneration is to
take place irrespective of the outcome of the bid,
the Olympic Games would accelerate the process
and ensure that sport would be the major focus of
the project.
The location of the Olympic Village within the
Olympic Park (which includes the proposed
Olympic stadium) would be very convenient, as
49% of athletes would be competing in close
proximity to the village.
Whilst the Olympic Park would undoubtedly leave
a strong sporting and environmental legacy for
London, the magnitude of the project, including the
planned upgrade and expansion of transport
infrastructure, would require careful planning to
ensure all facilities and rehabilitation projects were
completed on time.
65
POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC CLIMATE
AND STRUCTURE
The population of the London Metropolitan area
is expected to increase moderately from 7.3 to
7.5 million by 2012.
LEGAL ASPECTS
AND GUARANTEES
Guarantees
The bid committee has provided all of the
guarantees required by the IOC, the majority of
which are in order.
Political structure and responsibility
The UK is a parliamentary democracy with a
constitutional monarch as Head of State. The Prime
Minister, as leader of the majority party in
parliament, is the head of government.
The guarantees delivered by the Manchester United
and Aston Villa football clubs are subject to future
negotiations regarding the commercial conditions
for the use of these venues for the Games.
Greater London is made up of 33 boroughs and is
administered by the Greater London Authority
(GLA) with the Mayor having executive powers.
The completion of a “compulsory purchase order”
procedure (land appropriation) may be necessary
to acquire the remaining land needed for the
Olympic Park from various businesses. Whilst there
could be dispute resolution processes to determine
financial aspects of the acquisition, the Commission
believes that the land required would be obtained
without any undue delay to construction schedules.
National economy
The economy is currently very stable and the
currency is strong. World Bank statistics indicate
that, in 2003, the UK had the fourth largest
economy in the world and a preliminary estimate
on average annual growth rate was 2.2% with
domestic price inflation at 2.9%.
Support
The bid enjoys strong support and commitment
from the Queen, the national government and the
GLA. This was demonstrated through the
participation of various ministers throughout the
Commission’s visit. The bid is also supported by all
major political parties. This was underlined to the
Commission during a meeting with the Prime
Minister and the leaders of the two main
opposition parties.
A public opinion poll commissioned by the IOC
shows the following levels of support to host the
2012 Olympic Games: 68% support in London and
70% support throughout the country.
Legislation
During its visit, the Commission received
documentation outlining the provisions that would
be included in UK legislation to facilitate the
organisation of the Games and passed by
Parliament after 6 July 2005, if London were
awarded the Games. In view of the support
expressed by all political parties, the Commission
believes this legislation would be passed.
The Act establishing a new lottery to be used for
the funding of Olympic Games infrastructure has
already been passed by UK Parliament.
Agreements
In 2003, a Memorandum of Understanding
was signed by the UK government and the GLA
to provide a USD 3.8 billion funding package,
66
LONDON
London
USD 2.4 billion of which would come from two
lotteries, to ensure the financing of major
infrastructure projects and government services
related to the Olympic Games.
A Joint Venture Agreement relating to the
establishment and operation of the OCOG has
been signed by the Secretary of State for Culture,
Media and Sport, the Mayor of London and the
BOA. This agreement sets out the roles and
responsibilities of all parties, including financial
contributions and formation of the OCOG.
The Commission believes that, having such an
agreement in place before the election of the Host
City is a positive factor, in so far as it sets out the
framework for the planning and organisation of the
Games, thus facilitating the transition to and
formation of the OCOG.
OCOG structure
During its visit, the Commission received
clarification concerning the structure of the OCOG
and its relation to other bodies involved in the
preparation and delivery of the Games. The OCOG
would be a private limited company, the
stakeholders of which would be the UK
government, the GLA, the BOA and the British
Paralympic Association. The OCOG would be at
the heart of the structure and would prepare and
drive the organisation of the Games.
An Olympic Board would act as the primary link
between the OCOG, the governmental bodies (UK
government and GLA) and the BOA. The Olympic
Delivery Authority (ODA), a service provider to
OCOG, would be established by law to oversee the
construction and delivery of the infrastructure
required for the Games within the agreed timelines
and budget.
The London bid has proposed a transition team to
lead operations between the awarding of the
Games and the formation of the OCOG. This team
would comprise members of the bid committee
and would be funded by the government.
67
CUSTOMS AND
IMMIGRATION
FORMALITIES
ENVIRONMENT AND
METEOROLOGY
Entry to the country
Plans and actions
The Olympic identity and accreditation card would
serve as official access to the country in accordance
with IOC requirements. The UK is a member of the
European Union (EU). The guarantees signed by
the government are not subject to further
negotiations with EU authorities as the UK is not a
signatory to the Schengen agreement.
Work permits
The UK government guaranteed that work permits
for temporary foreign workers coming to the UK to
perform Olympic duties would be issued free of
any duties or taxes.
Importation of goods
The temporary importation into the UK of goods
required for the Olympic Games is authorised free
of any duties. Food brought by delegations for
their own consumption would be subject to
existing restrictions.
The London 2012 environmental plan is based on a
“Towards a One Planet Olympics” concept, which
aims to create a major and enduring legacy for
sport, the community and the environment.
The environmental centrepiece of the bid and
Games plans is the development of Olympic Park
which would create a large new urban parkland,
featuring wetland and waterways restoration,
natural corridors, environmental solutions to
resources, water, waste and energy management,
and sustainable building development. New green
areas would be created in Olympic Park after the
Games as part of its integration into a greatly
expanded Lower Lea Valley Park.
A comprehensive OCOG management scheme
fully integrated into a wider city regeneration
plan features a major set of priority actions
and results, such as energy, waste, green areas,
and environmental education.
The OCOG budget for environmental actions is
integrated, as is the environment programme,
across various operational and functional areas.
In the non-OCOG budget, approximately
USD 700 million of the total estimated
infrastructure investment in the Olympic project
are allocated for environmental actions.
Air and water quality
Air quality in London at proposed Games-time is
generally satisfactory. Increasing levels of ozone
pollution are however a concern, but legislation
and actions now in place, such as the “low-
68
LONDON
London
emission zone” and the “congestion charge”, are
aimed at correcting that trend and ensuring all air
pollutants are within World Health Organisation
(WHO) and EU target levels by 2010.
The ratification of the Kyoto Protocol by the UK
will facilitate lower greenhouse gas emissions and
better air quality.
Water quality at the triathlon, rowing/canoe kayak
flatwater and sailing venues is satisfactory.
Meteorology
Average temperatures (according to figures
provided, 23°C at 3 p.m.) and humidity levels at
proposed Games-time are satisfactory, as are wind
speeds. There is an average of five precipitation
days in London at proposed Games-time.
Additional comments
The OCOG Sustainability Management System
should ensure strong coordination and cooperation
with public authorities on environmental issues and
the delivery of related programmes by all
government and city agencies and the OCOG.
Environmental sustainability assessments have
been carried out at all venues and environmental
impact would be minimised by using and adapting
existing venues, constructing temporary facilities,
and concentrating new buildings within the
Olympic Park.
There is a strong emphasis on the integration
of environmental considerations across all aspects
of planning and operations, ensuring minimum
impact and maximum sustainability and the
integration of those plans and actions into
wider regeneration and environmental strategies
for London. Comprehensive and positive
environmental legacies for the community and the
Olympic Movement would be achieved from a
London 2012 Olympic Games.
69
FINANCE
OCOG budget
London has proposed a balanced revenue and
expenditure budget of USD 2.46 billion.
Contributions from the IOC and TOP sponsors
amount to 36% of total revenue. Revenues from
local sponsors, official suppliers, ticket sales, and
licensing total USD 1.3 billion or 54% of revenue. A
subsidy of USD 72 million for the Paralympic
Games would be provided by the UK government.
Major expenditure items include sports venue
operations at USD 417 million or 17% of
expenditure, technology at USD 448 million (18%),
administration at USD 255 million (10%), transport
at USD 198 million (8.5%) and Games workforce at
USD 187 million (8%).
No capital investment is included in the OCOG
budget, in accordance with IOC guidelines.
Non-OCOG budget
Of the USD 15.8 billion non-OCOG budget presented
in the candidature file, only USD 2.1 billion are
directly related to the Olympic Games.
The UK government and the Mayor of London
have agreed to a total funding package of
USD 3.8 billion to finance Olympic infrastructure
including USD 600 million for roads and
railways, USD 700 million for sports venues and
USD 800 million for Olympic Park infrastructure.
USD 1 billion would come from the London
Council Tax and USD 400 million from the
London Development Agency. USD 2.4 billion
would come from lotteries – USD 1.2 billion from
an existing lottery and USD 1.2 billion from a new
lottery to support the Olympic Games.
Financial guarantees
The UK government has guaranteed it would act as
the ultimate financial guarantor to cover any
shortfall from the Games.
Additional comments
The budgeting process is very detailed and
meticulous, and assumptions are well supported
and documented. The budget appears to be
reasonable and achievable.
70
LONDON
London
MARKETING
Joint Marketing Programme
The Joint Marketing Programme Agreement (JMPA)
signed by London and the BOA has been accepted
by the IOC.
A separate JMPA has also been signed between
London 2012 and the British Paralympic
Association.
Billboards and advertising
Guarantees have been secured for all outdoor
advertising sites in London with the exception of
approximately 1% of the 2,700 sites controlled by
the British Airports Authority (BAA) which is
covered by long-term contracts. London 2012 has a
binding agreement with the BAA to take control of
these sites in the event that these contracts are not
renewed. The guarantees signed by advertising site
owners include a price formula based on an annual
increase of 6% until 2012.
Ticketing
The bid committee has stated that expected strong
spectator demand, proactive ticket marketing and
reasonable prices would ensure full stadia. It also
indicated that facilities for ticket exchanges and
the reselling of tickets would be introduced to
help ensure full stadia using the experience of
Wimbledon. Ticketing revenue estimates are
based on sales rates of 82% for the Olympic Games
and 63% for the Paralympic Games and amount to
USD 473 million and USD 23 million respectively.
It is believed that these targets are achievable.
Local sponsorship and licensing
The target for domestic sponsorship is USD 725
million. Revenue of USD 92 million from licensing,
coins and stamps is projected. Given the UK’s
strong market for both sponsorship and licensing,
these revenue targets are considered to be realistic.
Additional comment
Rights protection
Current legislation exists to protect Olympic marks
and intellectual property rights and to control street
vending and illegal advertising, and also to provide
a system of planning permission for billboards.
The UK government has guaranteed to introduce
new legislation to enhance protection of Olympic
and Paralympic emblems, marks, logos and
mascots. London 2012 has proposed to set up a
Brand Protection Task Force to control outdoor
advertising and eliminate ambush marketing.
The marketing programme proposed by London is
reasonable and achievable.
71
SPORTS AND VENUES
Overall concept
The centrepiece of London’s proposal is the
Olympic Park, to be constructed in east London.
London proposes two additional clusters (River
and Central).
The Olympic Park would include the Olympic
Village, the Olympic stadium and venues for 12
other sports/disciplines (1-6 km/2-11 minutes from
the Olympic Village). It would provide a muchneeded legacy for sport to an area of London in
need of regeneration.
The River cluster (14 sports/disciplines, 10-15 km/
11-17 minutes from the Olympic Village) and the
Central cluster (6 sports/disciplines, 13-16 km/
22-28 minutes) would use a mix of existing venues
and iconic landmark sites.
would be played at five existing stadia outside
London with travel distances ranging from 203 to
667 km.
London proposes to use five well-known public
sites with temporary construction as competition
venues for the Games. The bid committee selected
two of these temporary sites in preference to
existing but more distant international facilities
(shooting and equestrian) to benefit athletes
through reduced travel times.
The use of Wimbledon for tennis (24 km/42 minutes
from the Olympic Village) and Eton Dorney for
rowing/canoe kayak flatwater (56 km/61 minutes),
whilst requiring additional travel times for athletes,
makes very good use of existing world-class venues.
Venue construction status
64% of competition venues needed for the Games
already exist, are under construction or are planned
irrespective of the Games.
Travel distances/times summary
Distances/times from
Olympic Village
Number of
competition venues
0 – 10 km (3 – 12 minutes)
10 – 20 km (11 – 28 minutes)
20 – 30 km (22 – 42 minutes)
30 – 40 km
40 – 50 km
50 – 100 km (60 minutes)
100 km and over
13
9
4
0
0
1
6 (football and sailing)
Sailing would be held at the Weymouth / Portland
venue (238 km), the site of the UK National Sailing
Academy. In addition to Wembley Stadium, football
Under
Games dependent
Existing
construTotal
ction or
number
planned,
of sports No work
Work
venues to required required irrespective Permanent Temporary
of the
be used
Games
33
13
2
6
3
9
Construction of the aquatic centre, the Velopark
(track and BMX), Regents Park softball centre and
the Broxbourne canoe kayak slalom course would
take place irrespective of the Games. In addition,
the 90,000-seat Wembley football stadium will be
completed in early 2006.
The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) would be
responsible for managing the construction
programme, with all permanent construction to be
completed by July 2011. A detailed construction
timetable was supplied.
72
LONDON
London
PARALYMPIC GAMES
Budget
The design of the planned Olympic stadium
(80,000 seats) would enable seating capacity to be
reduced to 25,000 in post-Games mode, for it to
become the National Athletics Centre.
Athletes from 18 sports/disciplines would be able
to train in and around Olympic Park, including at
three competition venues. Athletes from a further
12 sports/disciplines would train at their respective
competition venues.
Guarantees
The Commission noted that written guarantees
were received for the use of all existing venues and
proposed sites for new permanent/temporary
venues as well as for the respect of IOC
commercial requirements within these venues. Two
of these guarantees were, however, still subject to
negotiation (Manchester United and Aston Villa
football clubs).
Sports experience
London regularly stages many large-scale public
events.
The
city
has
staged
World
Championships/European Championships in only
8 Olympic sports over the past 10 years, but the
UK has successfully hosted international events in
most Olympic sports as well as the 2002
Commonwealth Games.
The BOA and London 2012 have introduced a
support and development programme in sports
where results are currently below international
standards.
A balanced Paralympic Games budget of
USD 144 million is projected and integrated within
the overall OCOG budget. Revenue includes 50%
in government subsidies (USD 72 million), with
sponsorship at USD 35 million and ticket sales at
USD 23 million. Expenditures include both pro-rata
and incremental costs for the Paralympic Games.
The budget includes a broadcast contingency of
USD 8 million. Guarantees for the financing for the
Paralympic Games have been received from the UK
government, the GLA and LDA as part of the
overall funding package.
Sport
The proposed dates for the Paralympic Games are
Wednesday 29 August to Sunday 9 September.
London’s Olympic Park would be the centrepiece
of a compact venue plan, with 11 sports/disciplines
taking place in the park, and another 7 sports in the
River cluster. Only road cycling and sailing would
be held at other stand-alone venues. All sports
would be held in Olympic competition venues
except for wheelchair tennis which would be
located at another site in Olympic Park.
Organising Committee
There would be one integrated organising
committee with legal and operational responsibility
for both Games. The British Paralympic Association
would nominate a representative to the OCOG
Board of Directors. A Paralympic Games division,
headed by a member of the senior management
team, would be responsible for coordination and
planning. Any area with significant Paralympic
activity would have staff with shared responsibilities.
73
Logistics
The Paralympic Village would comprise ten of the
17 blocks planned for the Olympic Village. The
village would be based on a 100% inclusive design
resulting in a barrier free environment. The village
would accommodate team delegations as well as
International Paralympic Sports Federations (IPSF)
technical officials. Media would be accommodated
in hotels used by media during the Olympic
Games.
The transport Olympic Route Network would
remain in use, although on a reduced scale as
fewer venues would be required for the Paralympic
Games. It is estimated that 95% of competitors
would have a journey of 15 minutes or less from
the village to their venues. All public transport
would be fully accessible, including 21,000 London
taxis, which are all currently wheelchair accessible.
Public transport would be free to all accredited
persons and spectators with same-day tickets.
Media and communications
In the UK, Paralympic sport has received significant
television coverage resulting in strong public
support and a high national profile. London 2012
plans to build on this through communication
initiatives and education programmes.
The same IBC/MPC facilities would be used for the
Paralympic Games, although adjusted to an
appropriate scale.
Additional comments
London 2012 has proposed integrated Olympic and
Paralympic Games that would minimise the
planning and operational differences between
them, while using innovative marketing strategies
to promote their distinctiveness. It would be a
compact Paralympic Games with a vision of setting
new standards for services and facilities. Concepts
have been developed and planned to maintain
public interest and a sports festival atmosphere,
including a carnival linking the two Games.
With its rich history, the capacities of UK
Paralympic Sport are among the best in the world.
The bid committee has proposed a “Paralympic
legacy for all” including social, educational and
sport legacies with a focus on improving society.
74
LONDON
London
OLYMPIC VILLAGE
Location/concept
Village organisation
The Olympic Village would be situated in
Olympic Park, adjacent to the Olympic stadium.
The village would be 39 km (47 minutes) from
the main gateway airport (Heathrow) and 14 km
(24 minutes) from the centre of London.
A total of 9,460 rooms (7,860 double and 1,600
single rooms) would be provided with a total of
17,320 beds for athletes and officials. Room sizes
and raw floor space would be in accordance with
IOC requirements.
Additional accommodation would also be provided
for sailing and rowing/canoe kayak flatwater athletes.
At remote venues, athletes would stay in student
accommodation at Royal Holloway College (rowing
and canoe kayak flatwater), on a cruise ship
(sailing) and in hotels (football). The Commission
received a commitment that accommodation at
these remote venues would have the same level of
services as the Olympic Village.
Village development
The surface area of the Olympic Village would be
30 hectares.
Apartment buildings would be clustered around
landscaped squares and range from 4 to 13 storeys.
Although athletes would not be accommodated
higher than the eighth floor, careful consideration
would have to be given to the location and
frequency of the elevators in the village buildings.
NOC extra officials could be accommodated in
village buildings above the eighth floor.
Post-Games, the Olympic Village would be
converted into a sustainable community of
apartments and town houses. The polyclinic and
Olympic Village administration offices would be
converted into nursery, primary and secondary
schools as well as a lifelong learning centre,
providing an educational legacy for the community.
The Mayor of London and the London
Development Agency (LDA), working with a
public/private consortium, would ensure the
construction and delivery of the Olympic Village.
Construction of permanent buildings would begin
in June 2007 and end in December 2011.
NOC travel costs
NOC and NPC delegation travel costs are included
in the OCOG budget, in accordance with IOC
requirements.
Additional comments
Athletes have been closely involved in the planning
of the Olympic Village. The east side of the village
would appear to be somewhat crowded, with the
main dining hall, polyclinic and disco in close
proximity to the international zone. However, this
is to provide the athletes with privacy in the
residential areas. The location of a retail outlet in
the residential as well as the international zone is,
again, aimed at giving athletes private retail
facilities. The bid committee stated its commitment
to incorporate noise reduction measures in
construction specifications.
75
MEDICAL SERVICES
The UK public health care system is very efficient
and would provide good health care during the
Olympic Games.
Olympic health care
Medical support would be available at all
competition and training venues. 24-hour medical
care would also be provided free of charge at the
Olympic Village and in IOC hotels.
Forty-one hospitals, including specialised services,
would be available to athletes, IFs, NOCs and the
IOC. A selection of these hospitals would have
dedicated Olympic wards. Emergency services,
which would be run through a centralised
coordination service, would be reinforced during
the Games.
NOC team doctors would need to apply for
registration to ensure that they would be authorised
to practice and write prescriptions in the UK for
their own NOC delegation at Games-time.
No duties would be applied to medical equipment
that would be exported after the Games.
Doping control
The UK has signed the Copenhagen Declaration
and the NOC has also adopted the WADA code.
There are two WADA-accredited laboratories in the
UK, one in London and one in Newmarket. The
London laboratory would be the main laboratory
for the Games. The Newmarket laboratory is also
accredited to carry out equine testing.
SECURITY
The UK government guarantees that it would take
the overall responsibility for security during the
preparation and staging of the Olympic and
Paralympic Games. It has also guaranteed to cover
all security costs (for which a provision has been
made as part of the USD 3.8 billion funding
package), with the exception of in-venue security
costs which would be borne by the OCOG for a
sum of USD 36.8 million.
Command structure
A government-level Olympic Security Committee
incorporating all of the key security agencies would
be formed, chaired by the Home Secretary. This
Committee would be responsible for security
coordination and policy with the London
Metropolitan Police Service playing a key role.
An OCOG Security Directorate would act as the
single point for planning and command. The head
of this directorate would be appointed by the
Home Secretary and would be a member of the
Olympic Security Committee.
Safety and security personnel
Whilst the majority of personnel would be drawn
from the three London police forces, the armed
forces and other security personnel including
private and police forces from other parts of the UK
would also be used. Security forces are well
trained, equipped and technologically advanced
and would be capable of providing the necessary
response to ensure safe and peaceful Games.
76
LONDON
London
ACCOMMODATION
Experience
The UK played a key role in the seven-nation
Athens Olympic Security Advisory Group which
provided support and training to the Greek
authorities in the lead-up to the 2004 Olympic
Games.
The UK has hosted a large number of sports and
other international events, demonstrating it has the
experience to cover potential security risks.
General
Letters of guarantee have been received for
approximately 40,330 rooms.
The current hotel room capacity of approximately
103,000 within a 50 km radius of the city centre far
exceeds IOC needs. There would be sufficient
hotel capacity for spectators and visitors during the
Games period, especially taking into account
additional rooms available in the affordable bed
and breakfast system in and around the city.
Room rates
The bid committee has guaranteed 1,800 rooms for
the IOC at USD 290 (2012 price), including
breakfast(s) and taxes in six 5 star hotels in the
centre of London. To guarantee this price, a
provision has been made in the OCOG budget.
For other constituent groups, the room rate would
be calculated as follows: the average actual and
audited, pre-tax room rate during the period
of the Games in 2007-2010, adjusted for inflation
(2% from 2010-2012) + a 2% premium 2010-2012 +
taxes + breakfast. In addition, a USD 12 booking
fee per night would be added.
Specifics
IFs and NOCs would have a wide choice of 3-5 star
hotels in West London. Technical officials would be
accommodated in single rooms with en-suite
bathrooms in 3 – 5 star hotels close to their venues.
200 rooms would also be available in university
accommodation (equivalent to a 2 or 3 star hotel)
with sports facilities, including a swimming pool.
Sufficient rooms of appropriate quality have been
guaranteed in the five football cities as well as in
Weymouth (sailing) for the respective officials.
77
TRANSPORT
Guests of NOCs, broadcasters and sponsors would
be accommodated in 4 or 5 star hotels across the
city centre.
No minimum stay period is required in any of the
guaranteed hotels.
Media would be accommodated in hotels and
university rooms (with the same level of facilities
and services), at reasonable rates, within a centrally
located accommodation cluster. All accommodation
would be connected by shuttle transport services to
and from the IBC and MPC.
The OCOG would organise a free of charge homestay programme for athletes’ families.
Additional comments
London has a well-developed accommodation plan
and would be able to provide the number of rooms
required by the IOC as well as spectators. The
quality of hotels at all levels is generally good.
Infrastructure development and
public transport
London has comprehensive metropolitan road
and rail systems. Capital investment of more than
USD 30 billion is planned prior to 2012 for transport
renovation and development. Approximately
USD 11.6 billion of this transport budget has been
allocated to accelerate rail urban transport
development, particularly in the east London
Olympic area, and USD 600 million is directly
related to the Olympic project.
London has one of the world’s strongest systems
of airports with Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted and
London City airports among others. Heathrow and
Gatwick are connected to the centre of London by
express rail services. A new rail connection will
also link Stansted and London City airports to
Olympic Park by 2012. The capacity of Heathrow,
the main Olympic gateway airport, will be
substantially increased by the completion of a
new terminal (Terminal 5) by 2008.
Phase two of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link (CTRL)
is underway and will provide regional and
international access to central and east London. A
new station, Stratford International, would provide
direct access to Olympic Park and dedicated
shuttle trains would operate at Games-time
resulting in a travel time of seven minutes to the
centre of London.
London’s underground, light rail and regional
rail networks will be substantially upgraded
and extended, particularly in east London, with
Olympic Park to be served by a total of ten
rail lines.
78
LONDON
London
Olympic transport concept and operations
The London 2012 Olympic transport concept is
founded on three principles:
a) Concentration of Olympic travel demands in
Olympic Park and the nearby River cluster with
approximately 69% of competition venues less
than 15 minutes from the Olympic Village
b) Constituent group transport to be facilitated by
an extensive Olympic Route Network, allowing
fast and reliable travel
c) Comprehensive public transport, with at least
one rail station serving all Olympic venues.
For the Games, a 235 km Olympic Route
Network (470 km if both directions are taken into
consideration) would allow efficient travel between
Olympic Park and Olympic competition and noncompetition venues. Within this network, a core
system of 82 km of fully dedicated Olympic lanes
(41 km each way) would be provided across London.
As a result of the Olympic Route Network and the
consistently lower traffic levels in August, the
Commission believes that Olympic bus travel
speeds of 45–50 km/h between the Olympic Village
and all Olympic venues would be achievable.
London proposes that accredited workforce would
access Olympic venues by public transport,
principally rail, free of charge. All accredited
persons would have free access to public transport.
Each spectator ticket would include free travel on
all public transport within London (except the
Heathrow Express) on the day of the event through
to 4 a.m. the following day.
An Olympic Transport Authority (OTA) would be
created to oversee the management of all Olympic
transport infrastructure projects, to plan Olympic
transport systems and to deliver transport at
Games-time. The existing London Traffic Control
Centre would be expanded to become the primary
traffic control centre for the Olympic Games.
Additional comments
During the bid process, substantial London rail
transport infrastructure investments have been
clearly confirmed, guaranteed and accelerated.
Provided that this proposed programme of public
transport improvements is fully delivered on
schedule before 2012 and the extensive Olympic
Route Network is implemented, the Commission
believes that London would be capable of coping
with Games-time traffic and that Olympic and
Paralympic transport requirements would be met.
79
MEDIA OPERATIONS
The IBC and MPC would be co-located on the edge
of the Olympic Park, in close proximity to the
Olympic stadium.
Construction funding is guaranteed under the
government financial package but private sector
investment would be sought, as the infrastructure
would remain after the Games as television studios
and production facilities.
The proposed designated space for the single
storey IBC (65,000m2) is smaller than IOC
recommendations, but shared resources, new
technology and the availability of extra space,
if required, should ensure the necessary space
for all operations. The two-storey MPC would
be 45,000m2. A dedicated transport shuttle
service would connect the IBC, MPC, media
accommodation and competition venues.
OLYMPISM
AND CULTURE
Cultural programme
London has proposed an extensive and varied
programme of activities, including theatre, music,
carnival performances and exhibitions in museums
during the Games. This programme would begin
immediately after the Beijing Olympic Games with
the launch of the “Olympic Friend-ship” (an oceangoing clipper) which would tour the world
conducting an Olympic educational programme.
Ceremonies
The Opening and Closing Ceremonies would be
held in the proposed 80,000-seat Olympic stadium.
The stadium would be within walking distance of
the Olympic Village which would facilitate
pedestrian access to the village for team
delegations after the Opening and Closing
Ceremonies.
Education and information programme
Accredited media would be accommodated in
hotels and university rooms with the same level of
facilities and services in a centrally located
accommodation cluster.
A city centre facility for non-accredited media is
planned and the desirability of the centre being
under the control of the OCOG was acknowledged
by London 2012.
Broadcasting
The Commission received commitments that UK
labour laws would not affect broadcasters or OBS
in their employment and operation schedules for
UK and foreign staff.
A new Olympic dimension would be introduced
into existing educational programmes for 400,000
school children. A special education pack for
schools would be developed by OCOG in
association with the British Olympic Foundation.
Torch relay
Plans for the torch relay propose to highlight the
Olympic Truce through a programme called the
“Heralds of Peace”, crossing through the countries
of Nobel Peace Prize winners and then through
the UK.
Youth camp
The youth camp would be housed in the “Olympic
Friend-ship”, to be docked in the Port of London
during the Games. The OCOG would pay for
participants’ airfares, accommodation and meals
(two participants per NOC).
MADRID
Madrid
81
82
MADRID
Madrid
OLYMPIC GAMES
CONCEPT AND
LEGACY
Dates of the Olympic Games
Madrid proposes Friday 10 August to Sunday 26
August as the period of the Olympic Games, based
on the weather conditions, the school and university
holiday period and lower hotel occupancy.
Olympic Games concept
Madrid has proposed humanist, sustainable and
environmentally friendly Games. A rich cultural
programme is planned, aimed at bringing together
the people of Madrid and Spain in a celebration of
the Olympic ideals.
The legacy plan is well documented and an
organisation comprising representatives from the
national and city governments as well as the
Spanish Olympic Committee would be established
to manage the sports venues legacy. After the
Games, sports equipment would be transferred to
Spanish sport.
The Paralympic Games are well integrated into the
planning of Madrid 2012, thereby safeguarding the
interests of the Spanish Paralympic Movement.
Additional comments
The Games concept is based on using venues
predominantly located in three main clusters, one of
which is in close proximity to the Olympic Village,
and venues on the outskirts of Madrid within
reasonable travel times of the village. Madrid’s
concept ensures that 58% of athletes would
compete within 10 minutes of the Olympic Village.
Madrid gives priority to sustainable development,
using the Olympic Games to take a significant step
forward in improving environmental conditions in
the city.
Legacy and impact
Madrid is a modern city intent on using the
Olympic project to further develop high-quality
sports facilities and world-class infrastructure, thus
consolidating the city as a permanent venue for the
staging of important events.
Taking into account existing venues, venues under
construction and those planned irrespective of the
Games, Madrid would have 83% of the venues
required to host the Olympic Games.
Madrid’s plan is based on the rapid development of
the city’s infrastructure and sports facilities. The
aspirations of the city’s leaders and the Spanish
Olympic and Paralympic Committees on behalf of
the athletes of Spain are well formulated.
Strengths of the bid include the close proximity of
venues in the East cluster to the Olympic Village
and the very good location of the Olympic Village,
IBC and MPC in relation to the newly-expanded
airport, public transport and major road networks.
The legacy plans are positive and the
environmental benefits are significant, with the
overall concept and plans well integrated into the
long-term development of the city.
83
POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC CLIMATE
AND STRUCTURE
Madrid has a stable population of 3.2 million whilst
the Madrid region is experiencing moderate growth
from 5.5 to 5.8 million by 2012.
Political structure and responsibility
Spain is a parliamentary monarchy, with the
monarch as Head of State. The Prime Minister, as
leader of the majority party in parliament, is the
head of government.
The Mayor of Madrid heads the bid. All sectors of
the city’s administration are deeply involved in the
bid process. The city has control of most Olympic
facilities within its administrative jurisdiction. There
is a clear demarcation of duties and responsibilities
among the three tiers of government (national,
regional - Autonomous Community of Madrid - and
local - Madrid City Council) with regard to their
Olympic involvement.
National economy
The economy is currently very stable and the currency
is strong. World Bank statistics indicate that, in 2003,
Spain had the 8th largest economy in the world and a
preliminary estimate on the annual growth rate was
2.4% with domestic price inflation at 3%.
Support
The bid enjoys support and commitment from the
King and all tiers of government. Political support
was demonstrated through the participation of the
Prime Minister and various government ministers
during the Commission’s visit. All major political
parties have also pledged support for the bid.
A public opinion poll commissioned by the IOC
shows the following levels of support to host the
2012 Olympic Games: 91% support in the city of
Madrid and 85% throughout Spain.
LEGAL ASPECTS
AND GUARANTEES
Guarantees
The bid committee has provided the guarantees
required by the IOC with the exception of a certain
number of accommodation guarantees, for
example in Palma de Mallorca (sailing).
Legislation
The Spanish legislative body is prepared to approve
specific legislation facilitating the organisation of the
Olympic Games, should Madrid be awarded the
Games. This legislation would cover finance, tax
and ambush marketing amongst other areas.
Agreements
Three separate documents were signed detailing
the different responsibilities and financial
commitments of the national government, the
Madrid Autonomous Community and Madrid City
Council. These agreements contain provisions
regarding infrastructure and venue construction,
the provision of public services and facilities and
covering any financial shortfall.
The Commission believes that having such
agreements in place before the election of the Host
City is a positive factor, in so far as it sets out the
framework for the planning and organisation of the
Games.
OCOG structure
The future OCOG would take the legal form of a
consortium which would be considered a not-forprofit public administration association.
The stakeholders would be the three tiers of
government involved in the bid (national, regional
and local) and the Spanish Olympic Committee.
84
MADRID
Madrid
CUSTOMS AND
IMMIGRATION
FORMALITIES
ENVIRONMENT AND
METEOROLOGY
Entry to the country
Plans and actions
The Olympic identity and accreditation card would
serve as official access to the country. As a member
of the European Union (EU), however, Spain is
subject to EU legislation. Spain has signed the
Schengen Agreement which allows free movement
of persons within the Schengen member states.
Negotiations with the EU would therefore be
necessary to ensure compliance with IOC
requirements, although the Commission expects
that the Athens and Turin precedents will apply in
this regard.
Work permits
The Commission was informed that there are
currently no quotas for foreign workers in Spain.
The government has provided a guarantee that
work permits would be delivered as required and
that prompt processing would be facilitated for
those workers coming to Madrid to perform
Olympic duties.
Importation of goods
The temporary importation of goods required for
the Olympic Games into Spain would be
authorised free of duties.
Madrid has placed much emphasis on integrating
environmental considerations and actions into all
aspects of Games planning and operations through
the development of a comprehensive OCOG
environmental plan. A series of major non-OCOG
strategies and actions is planned, including the
creation of approximately 5,000 hectares of new
green zones.
Under a Strategic Sustainability Plan, a detailed
assessment has been completed of 12 priority
areas including air quality and noise, mobility
and transport (a green fleet and public transport
for spectators), energy, urban development,
infrastructure and facilities, consumption habits,
water, and waste.
An Olympic Fund for Biodiversity, is planned
and would be funded from a 1% allocation of
all Olympic infrastructure development costs
(USD 16 million minimum). The fund would be
used to purchase areas of ecological significance
and to finance non-governmental organisation
(NGO) projects to restore degraded areas.
The OCOG’s environmental programme has a
USD 50.8 million budget allocation, and the overall
cost of OCOG and non-OCOG environmental
measures and actions (including infrastructure and
green areas) is estimated at over USD 250 million.
Air and water quality
Air quality in Madrid at proposed Games-time is
generally satisfactory, and adherence to lower EU
limits should ensure improvements by 2012.
85
FINANCE
The ratification of the Kyoto Protocol by Spain will
facilitate lower greenhouse gas emissions and
better air quality.
Water quality at the triathlon, rowing/canoe kayak
flatwater and sailing venues appears to be
satisfactory.
Meteorology
Average temperatures in Madrid at proposed
Games-time are relatively high (according to
figures provided, more than 30ºC at 3 p.m.) but
humidity is low. Commitments were given that
temperatures would be fully taken into account
when the sports competition schedule is finalised
to ensure that priority is given to athlete welfare.
There is an average of less than two precipitation
days during the proposed Games-time. Average
wind conditions appear to be satisfactory at all
outdoor venues.
Additional comments
Venues have strong environmental features.
Four competition venues - including the innovative
canoe kayak slalom venue which uses treated
recycled water - have been changed during the bid
process, following consultation with NGOs, for
environmental reasons and to reduce impact or
increase benefits. There would be a multi-faceted
legacy from a Madrid Games including new green
zones, sustainable building systems, a new set of
environmental indicators, rehabilitation of former
industrial sites (including the Olympic Village),
increased emphasis on public transport and
improved standards and practices.
OCOG budget
Madrid has proposed a balanced revenue and
expenditure budget of USD 2 billion.
Contributions from the IOC and TOP sponsors
amount to 45% of revenue. Revenues from local
sponsors, official suppliers, ticket sales, licensing,
lotteries and donations total USD 778.6 million
(39% of revenue). The national, regional and city
governments have each committed to providing
a subsidy of USD 43.5 million, or a total of
USD 130.5 million (6.5%) for the Paralympic Games.
Major expenditure items are Games workforce
amounting to USD 412 million (20.6% of
expenditure), administration at USD 203.7 million
(10.2%), sports venue operations at USD 137.7 million
(6.9%) and security at USD 95 million (4.7%). While
only USD 339 million (16.9%) is budgeted for
technology (compared with the IOC guideline of
USD 450 million), Madrid has advised that the
budget allocation was based on advice from major
technology companies, and is realistic. Madrid also
advised that the city regularly updates its technology
infrastructure and this would result in lower costs for
the Games. Technology workforce is also not
included in the technology budget. The transport
budget of USD 55 million (2.7%) appears to be low
in comparison with previous Olympic Games.
No capital investment is included in the OCOG
budget, in accordance with IOC guidelines.
Non -OCOG budget
The non-OCOG budget of USD 1.64 billion
(sports venues USD 970.9 million, Olympic Village
USD 641.7 million and roads and railways
USD 27 million) only includes costs directly related
to the Olympic Games. The different government
86
MADRID
Madrid
MARKETING
authorities have committed approximately USD 10
billion to upgrade transport infrastructure
irrespective of the Olympic Games.
Joint Marketing Programme
The Joint Marketing Programme Agreement signed
by Madrid and the Spanish Olympic Committee has
been accepted by the IOC.
Financial guarantees
The government of Spain, the region and the city
of Madrid, have each guaranteed to cover one third
of any financial shortfall. The three levels of
government have also agreed to provide all venues
owned by them free of charge to the OCOG for the
period of the Olympic Games.
Additional comments
The OCOG budgeting process is very detailed and
rigorous and assumptions are well supported and
documented. Whilst low in technology and
transport, the budget appears to be reasonable
and achievable.
A separate Paralympic joint marketing agreement
has been signed.
Billboards and advertising
Undertakings concerning advertising space and
rates have been provided by all the municipalities
involved in Madrid’s project, as well as by private
entities controlling advertising space, in accordance
with IOC requirements.
Rights protection
The combination of national, regional and
municipal legislation and guarantees are
considered to be sufficient to protect the IOC and
OCOG sponsors against ambush marketing. Madrid
has also proposed to set up a single department
under the OCOG, in collaboration with the public
authorities, to deal swiftly with any cases of
ambush marketing.
Ticketing
Madrid’s ticket-pricing strategy is based on
ensuring full stadia. The ticket sales rate, revised
during the Commission’s visit, is estimated at 77.5%
for the Olympic Games and 70% for the Paralympic
Games, with revenues of USD 363.4 million and
USD 13.5 million respectively. The Commission
considers this plan to be achievable based on
Madrid’s experience of organising other major
international events.
87
SPORTS AND VENUES
Local sponsorship and licensing
Projected revenue from local sponsorship and
suppliers amounts to USD 290.2 million and
USD 100 million for licensed merchandise, coins
and stamps.
Additional comments
Two lotteries are planned with a projected revenue
of USD 18 million. The Finance Ministry has
guaranteed that these lotteries will be held. While
the bid committee expressed confidence that the
revenue target would be met, it confirmed that any
overall budget deficit resulting from particular
shortfalls would be met by the national, regional
and city governments.
The marketing programme proposed by Madrid is
reasonable and achievable.
Overall concept
Madrid’s sports plan is based on three main
clusters (East, Central and West) located in the city
of Madrid.
The East cluster includes the Olympic Ring
(11 sports/disciplines, 1 – 3 km from the Olympic
Village), the IFEMA trade fair site (8 sports/disciplines,
5 km) and the beach volleyball venue (5 km). These
20 sports/disciplines would be within 10 minutes of
the Olympic Village providing minimum travel times
for 58% of athletes.
The Central cluster, essentially covering the city
centre, would host 5 sports/disciplines, with the
average distance from the Olympic Village being
12.8 km, the furthest being the Calderon
(football) stadium (18 km/15 minutes from the
Olympic Village).
The West cluster (Casa de Campo, Hippodrome and
Club de Campo) includes 7 sports/disciplines, with
distances from the Olympic Village ranging from 2030 km and travel times ranging from 16-20 minutes.
Five stand-alone venues, yet to be constructed on
the outskirts of the city (baseball, softball, shooting,
rowing/canoe kayak flatwater and canoe kayak
slalom), would provide a very good legacy based
on agreements already in place with municipal
authorities and the relevant national federations.
83% of competition venues already exist, are
under construction or are planned irrespective of
the Games.
88
MADRID
Madrid
Travel distances/times summary
Distances/times from
Olympic Village
Number of
competition venues
0 – 10 km (2 – 11 minutes)
10 – 20 km (9 – 18 minutes)
20 – 30 km (16 – 20 minutes)
30 – 40 km
40 – 50 km
50 – 100 km (34 minutes)
100 km and over
17
7
5
0
0
1
5 (football and sailing)
Venues on the outskirts of the city of Madrid softball and baseball (10 km/11 minutes from the
Olympic Village), shooting (14 km/16 minutes),
rowing/canoe kayak flatwater (55km/34 minutes)
and canoe kayak slalom (11 km/9 minutes) - are
well served by a high quality road network and an
advanced public transport system, based primarily
on rail.
Football would use six existing stadia, including four
outside Madrid, with distances ranging from 400 to
621 km, served by high-speed rail and air travel.
constructed over the period 2005 to 2011 with all
permanent venue construction being managed by
the Madrid City Council utilising a public
consortium where appropriate.
Madrid is experiencing a significant construction
period involving many major public infrastructure
projects. The Commission is confident that the
planned construction programme can be achieved
within the timeframe.
Madrid proposes a multi-sport venue at IFEMA
where athletes from 8 sports would be able to train
approximately 5 minutes from the Olympic Village,
while athletes from 11 sports/disciplines would
train at their respective competition venues.
Guarantees
The Commission noted that written guarantees
were received for the use of all existing venues and
proposed sites for new permanent venues as well
as for the respect of IOC commercial requirements
within these venues.
Sports experience
The sailing venue at Palma de Mallorca would be a
90-minute direct flight from Madrid.
Venue construction status
Under
Games dependent
Existing
construTotal
ction or
number
planned,
of sports No work
Work
venues to required required irrespective Permanent Temporary
of the
be used
Games
35
22
2
5
6
0
Three venues are currently under construction
(aquatics, tennis and the IFEMA trade fair
expansion). Eight new venues would need to be
Madrid has good experience in hosting major
international sports events including recent World
Championships in three Olympic sports, World
Cups in five Olympic sports and pre-Athens
Olympic Games Qualifying Tournaments in hockey
and wrestling.
Spain has hosted 25 World Championships and 25
European Championships in Olympic sports over
the past ten years. The experience from the 1992
Barcelona Olympic Games continues to be applied
in Spanish sport.
89
PARALYMPIC GAMES
Budget
A balanced Paralympic Games budget of
USD 145 million is projected and is integrated
within the overall OCOG budget. Revenue includes
90% in government subsidies (USD 130.5 million)
plus USD 13.5 million from ticket sales.
Expenditures include both pro-rata and incremental
costs for the Paralympic Games. Guarantees have
been received from the national, regional and local
governments to cover any shortfall in the budget.
Sport
The proposed dates for the Paralympic Games are
Friday 14 September to Tuesday 25 September.
Madrid’s Paralympic sports plan would see a
concentration of venues in the East cluster and all
of the sports, except road cycling, would be held
in Olympic venues. Twelve sports/disciplines
would take place in the East cluster and four in the
West cluster.
Organising Committee
The Olympic and Paralympic Games would have
a single, integrated organising structure with
the chief executive of the Paralympic department
serving on the OCOG Board of Directors. A
Paralympic department would manage the
Paralympic Games with projects integrated at three
levels – specialised Paralympic personnel, joint
departments and Olympic administration.
Logistics
The Paralympic Village would maximise use of the
Olympic Village and feature universal accessibility.
The plan includes independent sections for the
three main constituent groups – team delegations,
International Paralympic Sports Federations (IPSF)
technical officials and media.
Over 200 km of dedicated Paralympic lanes would
expedite movement of the Paralympic family.
Twelve sports/disciplines would be within 5 km
of the Paralympic Village, with travel times
estimated at less than 5 minutes. By 2012, all
public bus transport will be accessible with a
stated goal of universal accessibility on public
transport networks. Free access to public transport
would be offered to all accredited persons as well
as to ticketed spectators.
Media and communications
An educational programme prepared for the
Paralympic Games details an overall communication
strategy including media initiatives and a public
awareness campaign. The strategy involves
promoting Paralympic sport as an expression of
athletic ability.
The same IBC/MPC facilities would be used for the
Paralympic Games, although adjusted to an
appropriate scale.
Additional comments
Madrid 2012 has proposed integrated Games that
look to minimise planning and operational
differences between the Olympic and Paralympic
Games. It would be a compact Paralympic Games
with a priority on accessibility for athletes and the
general public. Spain has significant experience in
organising events for athletes with a disability,
including the 1992 Paralympic Games, and has a
strong history of international leadership in sport
for the disabled. Among others, the proposed
fundamental legacies include increased social
awareness of people with a disability and
eliminating architectural barriers in Madrid.
90
MADRID
Madrid
OLYMPIC VILLAGE
Location/concept
The Olympic Village would be adjacent to the
Olympic stadium, 8 km from the airport and 9 km
from the city centre. Additional accommodation
would also be provided in Palma de Mallorca for
sailing athletes.
Village development
The Olympic Village accommodation and facilities
would form part of a new residential
neighbourhood after the Olympic Games, which
the city has planned in order to face growing
needs. It would provide a combination of social
housing and private residences as well as a health
centre, an infant school, a civic centre and a
shopping and leisure centre. Buildings would be 4
to 6 storeys high.
The Olympic Village would cover 85 hectares. The
furthest walking distance within the village would
be 650 metres.
Madrid City Council (through public bodies and
corporations) would be responsible for the
planning and construction of the Olympic Village
and the necessary guarantees have been provided,
including financing of the project.
Construction of permanent buildings would begin
in January 2008 and finish in December 2011.
Village organisation
A total of 2,346 apartments would be provided with
16,800 beds in 8,400 double rooms for athletes and
officials. Room sizes and raw floor space would be
in accordance with IOC requirements.
The bid committee confirmed that all rooms would
be air conditioned, including the basements to be
used as NOC offices.
Additional officials would be accommodated in
hotels in close proximity to the village.
Sufficient hotel rooms have been guaranteed by the
bid committee in the four football cities.
No village has been planned for sailing competitors
and team officials and guarantees have only
been received from two hotels in Palma
de Mallorca providing 120 rooms, which would not
be sufficient.
NOC travel costs
NOC and NPC delegation travel costs are included
in the OCOG budget in accordance with IOC
requirements. In addition, it was confirmed that
OCOG would cover transport costs of horses, as
well as rowing, canoe kayak and sailing equipment.
Additional comments
The concept and location of the Olympic Village
within the East cluster are good. Some revision
to the design and layout of the village would
be required to ensure conformity with IOC
requirements. In order to alleviate any possible
concerns over noise due to the proximity of a
motorway, Madrid committed to adhering to
stringent noise reduction construction measures.
91
MEDICAL SERVICES
The Spanish public health care system is very
efficient and would provide good health care
during the Olympic Games.
Olympic health care
Medical support would be made available at all
competition and training venues. 24-hour medical
care would also be provided free of charge at the
Olympic Village and in IOC hotels.
Madrid confirmed that team doctors would be
authorised to practice and write prescriptions in
Spain for their own NOC delegation at Games-time.
The existing hospital infrastructure (37 hospitals)
would be able to meet Games-time needs. Six
hospitals have been designated as Olympic hospitals.
An emergency service and a civil protection plan for
natural disasters are currently in place and would be
operational during the Olympic Games. A central
unit within the OCOG would be created to manage
the coordination of all health care services.
No duties would be applied to medical equipment
that would be exported after the Games.
SECURITY
The Spanish government has guaranteed it would
take overall responsibility for security during the
preparation and staging of the Olympic Games.
It has also guaranteed to cover all security costs (for
which an estimation has been made) with the
exception of those for ensuring Olympic venue
safety, which would be under the responsibility of
an OCOG security department. These costs would
be borne by the OCOG for a sum of USD 95 million.
Command structure
Overall command would be vested in a High
Commission for Olympic Security under the
leadership of the Secretary of State for Security.
This High Commission would be composed of
representatives from all state agencies involved in
the provision of security, as well as representatives
from the OCOG, Madrid City Council, local
authorities and government delegations in the
Autonomous Communities. It would direct and
coordinate the activities and actions of the security
organisations and forces involved in providing
security and public safety for the Games, and would
be responsible for drawing up and coordinating the
security strategic plan and master plan.
Safety and security personnel
Doping Control
The Spanish government has signed the
Copenhagen Declaration. The Spanish Olympic
Committee has also adopted the WADA code.
Spain has two WADA-accredited laboratories in
Madrid and Barcelona. The Madrid laboratory
would be operational for the Olympic Games. In
addition, the FEI-accredited Barcelona laboratory
would be used for equine testing.
Whilst most of the personnel would be drawn from
the city and region of Madrid, reinforcement would
be provided by personnel from other areas of Spain
and armed and private security forces.
Security forces are well trained, equipped and
technologically advanced and would be capable of
providing the necessary response to ensure a safe
and peaceful Olympic Games.
92
MADRID
Madrid
ACCOMMODATION
Experience
General
Spain formed part of the seven-nation Olympic
Security Advisory Group which provided support
and training to the Greek authorities in the lead-up
to the Athens 2004 Olympic Games.
Approximately 33,000 1-5 star hotel rooms are
guaranteed by the bid committee and an additional
9,450 beds are guaranteed for the OCOG in university
and military accommodation equivalent to 1-2 stars.
Spain has hosted a number of sport and other
international events including the 1992 Olympic
Games in Barcelona which demonstrates that it has
the experience to cover security risks.
Madrid welcomes over 6 million visitors every year,
of which 65% are business tourists requiring high
quality accommodation. During the period of the
Olympic Games, the number of visitors is
traditionally lower than the rest of the year.
The city of Madrid has approximately 43,400 hotel
rooms within a 50 km radius of the city centre
(including 33,524 rooms within a 10 km radius).
33,810 of the total number of rooms are in 3, 4 and
5 star hotels.
Signed guarantees to construct new hotels in
Madrid over the next seven years have been
provided (6,282 new rooms) and other hotels
in proximity to Madrid will offer more
accommodation options.
Room rates
The hotels guaranteed for the IOC and other
constituent groups would be very reasonably
priced. The guaranteed prices in 2012 US dollars
for a double room, including breakfast and VAT, for
the IOC and constituent groups are as follows:
2 star
3 star
4 star
5 star
Luxury
IOC hotels
Constituent
groups including
media
125
166
258
418
120
141
186
290
469
93
There is no minimum stay requirement for
constituent groups including the IOC hotels.
Specifics
Technical officials would be accommodated in
single rooms. Half of them would stay in university
accommodation (equivalent to 2 star hotel quality)
with excellent sports facilities and a swimming pool
available and the other half would be
accommodated in 3 to 5 star hotels close to their
respective venues.
Guests of NOCs, broadcasters and sponsors would
be accommodated in quality 3, 4 and 5 star hotels
spread throughout the city centre and near the
Olympic Ring.
Football officials would be accommodated in
quality hotels in the different cities. 120 rooms have
been guaranteed in Palma de Mallorca (sailing).
The media would be accommodated in 2-5 star
hotels as well as university accommodation
(equivalent to a 2 star hotel). Careful consideration
would need to be given to the location of this
accommodation in relation to the IBC/MPC and
venues, as widely spread accommodation would
increase the transport logistics challenge for the
Games period. A commitment has been given that
most media hotels would be within 5 km of the
IBC/MPC complex, and there would be a 24-hour
transport service between the IBC/MPC and
media hotels.
Reservation centres, managed by professionals
from the hotel and tourist sector, would offer a free
of charge hotel booking service for both accredited
and non-accredited persons.
The bid committee proposes to organise an
accommodation programme for athletes’ families.
Details of this programme would need to be
elaborated.
Additional comments
The Commission is confident that, with the rooms
guaranteed in Madrid and additional rooms within
an hour’s journey time of the city, sufficient rooms
should be available to meet Olympic requirements,
including visitors.
94
MADRID
Madrid
TRANSPORT
Infrastructure development and
public transport
Since the mid 1980s, Madrid has undertaken an
outstanding metropolitan transport system
development involving all types of transport
(airport, roads, motorways, high speed rail,
suburban rail, subway, bus express lanes, etc).
Approximately USD 10 billion will be invested to
expand ground and air transport systems in the
Madrid region by 2012. This development would
take place irrespective of whether Madrid is
awarded the 2012 Olympic Games.
The international gateway airport (Madrid-Barajas)
is currently doubling its capacity from 34 to 70
million passengers per year, making it one of the
major European international hub airports. New
runways and terminal buildings will open between
2006 and 2012. The expanded airport, 9 km from
the Olympic stadium, 8 km from the Olympic
Village and 18 km from the city centre, will be
accessed by a new urban motorway and an express
subway line.
Olympic transport concept and operations
The Madrid 2012 Olympic transport concept is
based on three principles:
a) Concentration of Olympic travel demands in
two Olympic venue clusters with 48% of
Olympic venues less than 10 minutes from the
Olympic Village
b) Constituent group transport to be facilitated by
a large network of dedicated Olympic lanes
allowing fast and reliable travel
c) A high capacity public rail network serving
more than 90% of Olympic venues, with
dedicated Olympic shuttle bus services for
other venues.
For the Olympic Games, 98 km of existing reserved
bus lanes and an additional 320 km of Olympic
lanes (160 km each way) would facilitate Olympic
transport between the majority of competition and
non-competition venues.
Spain’s national railway company is adding four
lines to its first high-speed rail line (Madrid –
Cordoba – Seville), and all remote 2012 football
cities will be connected by high-speed rail.
Due to the extensive Olympic lane system and
lower traffic during the month of August, Olympic
bus travel speed estimates would average
approximately 60 km/h between the Olympic
Village and all competition venues offering short
travel times.
Madrid’s subway network, which has undergone
tremendous growth during the last decade, will
be extended by a further 90 km to approximately
320 km and 330 stations by 2008. Metro line
extensions will serve, amongst other sites, the
Madrid-Barajas airport extension, the Olympic
stadium and the Olympic Village.
Taking advantage of its comprehensive and
efficient public transport system, Madrid plans to
provide 100% spectator, workforce and volunteer
Olympic venue access by public transport. No
public car parking would be provided at Olympic
venues, lowering the risk of traffic congestion and
improving general environmental conditions.
95
MEDIA OPERATIONS
Ticketed spectators and all accredited persons
would have 24-hour free public transport access
within the Madrid metropolitan area.
An integrated regional transport and traffic
command and control organisation – the Madrid
Regional Transport Consortium - has been in
operation since the mid 1980’s. A Transport
Operations Centre would be set up to coordinate
and manage all transport operations during the
Olympic and Paralympic Games. This centre would
be managed by OCOG in close collaboration with
all Madrid transport authorities.
Additional comments
Madrid’s high capacity and quality metropolitan
road and rail transport systems and its continuing
development would comfortably cope with
considerable Games-time traffic.
Based on a compact Games concept and a very
extensive Olympic lane system, the Commission
feels confident that Olympic and Paralympic
transport requirements would be fully met.
The IBC and MPC would be located in single storey
purpose-built adjoining buildings in part of the
IFEMA trade fair complex (venues for 8
sports/disciplines) in close proximity to the
Olympic Ring which includes the Olympic stadium.
Madrid plans buildings of 65,000 m2 and 35,000 m2
for the IBC and MPC respectively. These spaces are
below IOC recommendations but the Commission
believes that with purpose-designed facilities,
shared resources and modern technology, the
space available would be sufficient.
IFEMA guarantees the financing for the
construction of the IBC/MPC and the temporary
use of the site for the IBC/MPC. Madrid City
Council is a major stakeholder in the IFEMA trade
fair site.
The media would be accommodated in hotels as
well as university accommodation.
Broadcasting
Work permits for foreign workers performing
Games duties would be provided as required and
there would be flexibility for work schedules of
foreign and domestic broadcasting employees,
including OBS.
96
MADRID
Madrid
OLYMPISM
AND CULTURE
Cultural programme
Madrid has proposed an extensive programme of
activities over several years, covering contemporary
art, photography, literature, and gastronomy. A
major Olympic Festival in 2012 would include
theatre, music, dance and street performances.
Ceremonies
The Opening and Closing Ceremonies would be
held in the Olympic stadium with a seating capacity
of 70,850. The Olympic stadium would be within
walking distance of the Olympic Village facilitating
pedestrian access for team delegations to the
village after the Opening and Closing Ceremonies.
Education and information programme
Madrid City Council would use 700 schools for the
promotion of Olympism, through grass roots sports
programmes. Madrid intends to produce a range of
educational materials to be launched in 2008 in
cooperation with the National Institute of Physical
Education.
Torch relay
Madrid plans to run the torch relay through the
Mediterranean countries to celebrate humanism in
Europe.
Youth camp
Madrid would invite two young persons from each
NOC and two from each Autonomous Community
in Spain to a youth camp to be held in Aranjuez,
55 km from Madrid, during the Olympic Games.
The bid committee confirmed that 50% of travel
costs and all accommodation costs would be
covered by the OCOG.
SUMMARIES
Summaries
PARIS
The candidature file and the information provided
to the Commission during its visit were of a very
high quality and showed thorough integration of all
Games planning components by the key
organisations involved in the preparation of the
bid. The Paris bid also shows careful consideration
of Games Study recommendations.
The city of Paris, the Ile-de-France region and the
French Government are the three major parties
involved in the bid. The respective roles and
responsibilities of each of the above authorities,
including service delivery, finance and construction,
have been detailed through the signing of formal
agreements. The French Olympic Committee is an
active participant in the bid process.
Paris proposes a compact “one village, two cluster”
concept. The Northern cluster contains venues for
16 sports/disciplines, including the existing
Olympic stadium and the Western cluster, venues
for 9 sports. The Olympic Village is located on
the ring road between and within 10 km of each
cluster. Athletes have played an important role in
the planning process.
Paris proposes a total of 32 competition venues,
12 of which exist. The 7 venues to be constructed
include the aquatics centre, the velodrome and
the gymnastics arena. Thirteen temporary venues
are planned.
A government agency – the Olympic Coordination
Organisation – would be the body responsible for
delivering construction projects.
Paris has proposed integrated Games that would
facilitate a first-rate sports event and general public
enthusiasm by positioning the Paralympic Games
as a community celebration. The proposed legacy
is enhanced awareness and integration of people
with a disability into French society, including
improved accessibility.
Sport would benefit from the construction of
several new venues. Comprehensive environmental
and accessibility actions central to the bid and
integrated into Games planning, construction and
operations would provide significant ecological
and social legacies in Paris and across France.
With an excellent accommodation proposal Paris
guarantees sufficient hotel rooms to cover Olympic
requirements. The 2012 IOC hotel room rate is
guaranteed at USD 480 for single rooms and USD 516
for double rooms. For other constituent groups, a
formula has been agreed to set prices in 2012.
Paris has high capacity and quality metropolitan
road and rail transport systems. With a compact
Olympic venue concept, extensive Olympic lane
and optimised traffic route networks, the
Commission feels confident that transport demands
would be fully met.
The Paris OCOG budget of USD 2.65 billion is
detailed, well documented and achievable.
The non-OCOG budget related to the Olympic
Games is fully guaranteed by the three levels of
government. In addition, the French Government
guarantees to cover any shortfall in the OCOG
budget.
97
98
SUMMARIES
Summaries
NEW YORK
Detailed plans presented in the candidature file were
supplemented by high quality presentations given
during the Commission’s visit by key organisations
involved in the preparation of the bid.
The New York bid is city driven with the strong
involvement of the State of New York and the support
of the Federal Government. The respective roles and
responsibilities of all major parties involved, including
the United States Olympic Committee, have been
formalised through the signing of the “Olympic
Multiparty Agreement”. These include service
delivery, finance and construction.
As is customary in the USA, many projects will
depend on investment by the private sector.
However, the OCOG would be responsible for
ensuring delivery of the venues.
Tendering and approval processes for the Olympic
stadium and IBC, sites essential to the hosting of the
Games, were still in progress at the time of the
Commission’s visit and no guarantees were provided
that these sites would be available for the
construction of Olympic infrastructure.
The OCOG would also be responsible for the
Paralympic Games, with an overall planning and
operational structure of integrated programmes. A
key objective for New York 2012 is the enhanced
profile of the Paralympic Games.
The Olympic Games would accelerate the
redevelopment and environmental rehabilitation of
derelict river front areas and other sites for Olympic
venues. The Olympic Games would create a legacy
for sport and the city through the building of several
new sports facilities which would be maintained
through the establishment of an Olympic legacy
foundation.
New York proposes an inner-city concept of three
main competition clusters with most venues situated
on two intersecting transport routes forming the
“Olympic-X” (a north-south route along the East
River and an east-west route running across New
York) with the Olympic Village at its centre.
Sufficient hotel rooms have been guaranteed to
cover Olympic requirements. The 2012 IOC hotel
room rate is guaranteed at USD 449. For other
constituent groups, a formula has been agreed to set
prices in 2012.
New York proposes a total of 31 competition venues,
17 of which already exist. The 9 venues to be
constructed include the Olympic stadium, the aquatics
centre, the velodrome, the rowing/canoe kayak
course, the sailing marina and the gymnastics arena. In
addition, there would be 5 temporary venues.
New York has a comprehensive metropolitan road
and rail transport system. The Commission believes
that with the extensive system of Olympic lanes
proposed to overcome congestion with regard to
access to and within the city centre, transport
demands would be met.
As a result of the inner-city concept, high-rise
buildings are proposed for the Olympic Village,
a waterfront development on the East River, and
the IBC.
New York’s OCOG budget of approximately
USD 3 billion is well supported and documented.
It contains USD 276.6 million of capital investments
for the construction of competition venues, items
99
which are usually included in the non-OCOG
budget. However, with New York’s strong revenue
generating potential, the OCOG budget is
considered to be achievable.
The non-OCOG budget would be largely covered
by the private sector.
To cover any shortfall the City and State of New York
have guaranteed funds of up to USD 250 million.
MOSCOW
The Commission received presentations on all
themes with the participation of all parties involved
in the preparation of the bid. These provided the
Commission with a fuller understanding of
Moscow’s plans. However, a lack of detailed
planning in the candidature file and background
information made it difficult for the Commission to
evaluate the project.
The Moscow bid is driven by the city, which takes
responsibility for Games planning and operations,
and is supported by the Federal Government, the
Russian Olympic Committee and the many Olympic
champions who live in Moscow.
Moscow proposes a “one-city” concept with all
competition venues, including football and sailing,
within the city. The concept is based on the legacy
of the 1980 Olympic Games, using existing wellmaintained venues in four of the five main
competition clusters (32 sports/disciplines) situated
alongside or near the Moscow river. The centrallylocated Olympic and media villages would also be
constructed on the banks of the Moscow river.
Moscow proposes a total of 34 competition venues,
23 of which exist. The 7 venues to be constructed
include the canoe kayak slalom, tennis and
gymnastics venues. Four temporary venues are
planned.
The city of Moscow would be the body responsible
for delivering general infrastructure and competition
venues.
The high number of existing competition venues
and those under construction mitigate financial and
construction schedule risks for competition venues.
If the substantial road and rail transport
infrastructure developments are carried out as
planned and appropriate traffic management
techniques are enforced, the Commission feels that
transport demands would be met.
The Paralympic movement in Russia is still
developing and is looking to a Moscow Paralympic
Games to stimulate financial and public support.
The regeneration and environmental rehabilitation
of riverfront areas, sites for the Olympic Village
and media village, the IBC and the MPC would
be accelerated through the Olympic Games.
Construction of these facilities and new sports
venues would provide a good legacy to the city.
To meet accommodation requirements, Moscow
would need to build a media village and
new hotels. The combination of guaranteed rooms,
new hotel construction in Moscow and the
construction of a media village should ensure sufficient
accommodation to meet Olympic requirements.
The 2012 IOC hotel room rates are guaranteed at
USD 390-450 (5 star) and USD 260-320 (4 star).
100
SUMMARIES
Summaries
For other constituent groups, a formula has been
agreed to set prices in 2012.
Moscow proposes an OCOG budget of
USD 1.84 billion which, whilst low in sports venue
operations, is achievable.
sports/disciplines including the proposed Olympic
stadium). Athletes have had a direct input into
village, venue and operational planning.
The city of Moscow guarantees to fully cover the
non-OCOG budget and any shortfall in the
OCOG budget.
London proposes a total of 33 competition
venues, 15 of which exist. The 9 venues to be
constructed include the Olympic stadium as well
as the aquatics centre and velodrome which are
both already under construction. Nine temporary
venues are planned.
LONDON
A government agency, the Olympic Delivery
Authority, would be set up to manage Olympicrelated construction programmes.
The candidature file and the information provided
to the Commission during its visit were of a very
high quality and indicated a high level of planning
by the key organisations involved in the
preparation of the bid.
The British Olympic Association (BOA), the UK
government and the Greater London Authority
(GLA) are the three major parties involved in the
bid. A memorandum of understanding between the
UK Government and the GLA provides for a
funding package largely reliant on lottery funds to
ensure the financing of major infrastructure projects
and government services related to the Olympic
Games. The respective roles and responsibilities of
all parties involved are outlined in the Joint Venture
Agreement signed by the UK Government, the city
and the BOA.
London’s concept is based on three main
competition clusters – Olympic Park, Central
cluster and River cluster – with the well-located
Olympic Village in the Olympic Park (13
With the OCOG having legal and operational
responsibility for both Games, a London Paralympic
Games would be fully integrated, while a marketing
strategy would promote their distinctiveness.
Paralympic sport in the UK has a rich history, strong
media coverage and public support and its
capacities are among the best in the world.
The Olympic Games would be the catalyst for the
regeneration and development of the Lower Lea
Valley, site for the Olympic Park. This park would
provide significant sports and environmental
legacies. Given the magnitude of the project,
careful planning would be required to ensure that
all facilities are completed on time.
Sufficient hotel rooms have been guaranteed to
cover Olympic requirements. The 2012 IOC hotel
room rate is guaranteed at USD 290. To guarantee
this price, a provision has been made in the OCOG
budget. For other constituent groups, a formula
has been agreed to set prices in 2012.
101
Provided that the substantial programme of public
transport improvements is fully delivered before
2012 and based on a Games concept concentrated
in the East of London and an extensive Olympic
Route Network, the Commission believes that
transport demands would be met.
London’s OCOG budget of USD 2.46 billion is
detailed, well supported and is achievable.
The non-OCOG budget related to the Olympic
Games is fully guaranteed through the funding
package. The UK Government has guaranteed to
cover any shortfall in the OCOG budget.
MADRID
Detailed plans were presented in the candidature
file and high quality presentations were given
during the Commission’s visit by the key
organisations involved in the preparation of the bid.
Responsibility for Games planning and operations is
shared by the three levels of government (national,
regional and local). The respective roles and
responsibilities of each of the above authorities,
including service delivery, finance and construction,
have been detailed through the signing of formal
agreements. The Spanish Olympic Committee is an
active participant in the bid process.
Madrid’s concept is based on three main
competition clusters – East, Central and West –
with the well-located Olympic Village in the East
cluster (20 sports/disciplines including the
Olympic stadium).
Madrid proposes a total of 35 competition venues,
24 of which already exist. The 11 venues to be
constructed include the velodrome, the rowing/
canoeing course and the gymnastics arena.
Others, such as the tennis and aquatics centres, are
already under construction. No temporary venues
are planned. The high number of existing venues
and those under construction reduce financial and
construction schedule risks.
Madrid City Council would be the body
responsible for delivering construction projects.
The Olympic and Paralympic Games would have a
single, integrated organising structure. Spain has a
history of international leadership in sport for the
disabled, and a Madrid Paralympic Games would
give high priority to accessibility for athletes and
the general public.
There would be significant environmental legacies
with the rehabilitation of large areas into new
parks and green zones. In addition, the
construction of several new facilities would
provide a positive sports legacy for the city.
Overall, Olympic plans are well integrated into the
long-term development of the city.
The guaranteed 2012 IOC hotel room rates are
USD 125 (3 star), USD 166 (4 star), USD 258 (5 star)
and USD 418 (luxury). For other constituent
groups, fixed 2012 prices have also been
guaranteed. Madrid may need to use hotels in cities
approximately one hour away by high-speed rail
in order to meet Olympic requirements and
spectator needs.
102
SUMMARIES
Summaries
Madrid has a high capacity and quality
metropolitan road and rail transport system. Based
on a compact Games concept and a very
extensive Olympic lane system, the Commission
feels confident that transport demands would be
fully met.
Madrid’s OCOG budget of USD 2 billion is well
supported and documented. Whilst low in technology
and transport, the budget appears to be achievable.
The non-OCOG budget for Games infrastructure is
fully guaranteed by the different authorities
involved. The national, regional and local
authorities have each guaranteed to cover one third
of any shortfall in the OCOG budget.
APPENDICES
Appendices
A. Composition of the Commission
B. List of visit dates
C. Accommodation table
D. Summary of IOC opinion poll results
E. Maps
F. Abbreviations
G. Signatures
103
104
APPENDIX A
Appendix A
COMPOSITION OF THE COMMISSION
Chairperson
Mrs Nawal EL MOUTAWAKEL
Executive Director
Mr Gilbert FELLI
Members
Mr Simon BALDERSTONE
Mr Philippe BOVY
Mrs Els van BREDA VRIESMAN
Mr Bob ELPHINSTON
Mr Frank FREDERICKS
Mr Paul HENDERSON
Mr Patrick JARVIS
Mr Mustapha LARFAOUI
Mr José Luis MARCO
Mr Ser Miang NG
Mr Sam RAMSAMY
IOC Administration
Ms Jacqueline BARRETT
Miss Sophie WILLATTS
Miss Helen STEWART
APPENDIX B
Appendix B
LIST OF VISIT DATES
Madrid
3 – 6 February 2005
London
16 – 19 February 2005
New York
21 – 24 February 2005
Paris
9 – 12 March 2005
Moscow
14 –17 March 2005
The order of visits was determined by logistic considerations.
The above dates represent official working days with each Bid Committee. In each city, the
Commission held an initial private meeting before the visit and a private debriefing at the end
of the visit.
The Commission held a final meeting in Lausanne from 19 to 22 March 2005.
105
APPENDIX C
Appendix C
106
ACCOMMODATION TABLE
(Extract from the IOC Technical Manual on Accommodation)
Constituent
Subgroup
Group
Category
IOC
Members
IOC Members
Summer
Rooms
Quality
(stars)
Accommodation
Facility
1,800
4 to 5
IOC Hotel(s)
1,600
2 to 4
Constituent Group
Hotels
Honorary and Honour Members
President
IOC Management
Director General
Directors
IOC Group Administration
IOC Interpreters
IOC Commissions (Medical, Ethics, Athletes)
IOC Advisors, Experts, Consultants, Agents
Other IOC
IOC Partners and Suppliers
IOC Guests, including IOC Members’ guests
ANOC, ASOIF, AIOWF, GAISF
Previous OCOGs (President, Director General)
Bid Cities (Executives)
Future Sessions
Summer IFs
Presidents / Secretaries General
Winter IFs
Presidents / Secretaries General
Future OCOGs
President, Director General, Mayor, Executives
Agencies
NOCs
IF
Technical Officials
Court of Arbitration for Sport
World Anti Doping Agency
Presidents/Secretaries General
International Technical Officials
National Technical Officials
700
Technical Delegates
800
Boards
Other IF
Staff
Guests
Host Country NGBs
100
3 to 5
107
Constituent
Subgroup
Group
Category
NOC
Additional Officials (Ao)
NOC Sponsors
Host Country NOC
Host OCOG
Marketing
Partners
Top Sponsors
OCOG Sponsors
Media
Broadcasters Hospitality
800
2 to 3
2,500
3 to 5
120
4
5
4 to 5
Ceremony Stars
100
4 to 5
Ceremony Production
425
2 to 3
60
4 to 5
Workforce
3,775
2 to 3
Ticket Agents
1,300
4 to 5
Domestic Dignitaries
3 to 5
500
3 to 4
Constituent Group
Hotels
2,290
4 to 5
475
3
Constituent Group
Hotels
3,060
4 to 5
Support and Technical Staff
400
3
Rights Holders Hospitality – NBC
400
5
Rights Holders Hospitality – EBU
750
4 to 5
17,500
3 to 4,
some 5
Staff
Hospitality Guests and Management
Support and Technical Staff
Hospitality Guests and Management
Host Broadcaster/OBS Production
Rights Holders Production – NBC
Rights Holders Production – EBU
Rights Holders Production – Others
3 to 4,
some 2
and 5
World News Agencies
Individual written & photographic press
Total
Constituent Group
Hotels
300
Host Broadcaster/OBS Hospitality
Written & Photographic
Press
Constituent Group
Hotels
240
Rights Holders Hospitality – Others
Broadcasters Production
Accommodation
Facility
International Dignitaires
Future OCOG
Observers
Quality
(stars)
President / CEO
Cultural Olympiad
Dignitaries
Summer
Rooms
40,000
Constituent Group
Hotels
108
APPENDIX D
AppendixD
SUMMARY OF IOC OPINION POLL RESULTS
The IOC commissioned MORI to conduct public opinion polling in the five Candidate Cities and
their respective countries regarding support for hosting the Games of the XXX Olympiad in 2012.
All five polls were carried out in December 2004.
In answer to the specific question:
“To what extent would you support or oppose [City] hosting the Olympic Summer
Games?”
the results were as follows:
Strongly
oppose
Tend to
oppose
Neutral/
Don't know
Tend to
support
Strongly
support
Paris*
3%
4%
8%
39%
46%
France
2%
3%
16%
35%
44%
New York*
15%
9%
17%
20%
39%
USA
8%
5%
32%
22%
32%
Moscow*
5%
3%
15%
24%
53%
Russia
4%
6%
14%
23%
53%
London*
11%
7%
15%
21%
47%
United
Kingdom
8%
4%
19%
22%
48%
Madrid*
2%
1%
6%
11%
80%
Spain
2%
1%
12%
11%
74%
109
All figures are expressed in percentage terms. Where they do not add up to 100%, this is due to computer
rounding.
* For the purpose of this research, the area in and around the Candidate Cities were defined as follows:
Paris :
UDA (Union des Annonceurs)
New York : Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan Counties, the Bronx and Staten Island
Moscow :
The City of Moscow
London :
UK Government Office Region for London
Madrid :
Madrid Metropolitan Area
110
APPENDIX E
Appendix E
PARIS
Paris
111
112
APPENDIX E
Appendix E
NEW YORK
New York
113
114
APPENDIX E
Appendix E
MOSCOW
Moscow
115
116
APPENDIX E
Appendix E
LONDON
London
117
118
APPENDIX E
Appendix E
MADRID
Madrid
119
120
APPENDIX F
Appendix F
ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations have been used in the report:
EU – European Union
FEI – International Equestrian Federation
GLA – Greater London Authority
IBC – International Broadcast Centre
IF – International Federation
IOC – International Olympic Committee
IPC – International Paralympic Committee
IPSF - International Paralympic Sports Federations
JMPA - Joint Marketing Programme Agreement
LDA – London Development Agency
MPC – Main Press Centre
NGOs – Non-Governmental Organisations
NOC – National Olympic Committee
OBS – Olympic Broadcasting Services
OCOG – Organising Committee for the Olympic Games
OCOO – Olympic Coordination Organisation
ODA – Olympic Delivery Authority
OTA – Olympic Transport Authority
RER – Regional Rail Lines
WADA – World Anti Doping Agency
WHO – World Health Organization
121
122
APPENDIX G
Appendix G
SIGNATURES
Mrs Nawal EL MOUTAWAKEL
Mr Gilbert FELLI
Mr Simon BALDERSTONE
Mr Philippe BOVY
Mrs Els van BREDA VRIESMAN
Mr Bob ELPHINSTON
123
Mr Frank FREDERICKS
Mr Paul HENDERSON
Mr Patrick JARVIS
Mr Mustapha LARFAOUI
Mr José Luis MARCÓ
Mr Ser Miang NG
Mr Sam RAMSAMY
I
Paris
O L Y M P I C
C O
w w w . o l y m p i c . o r g
N T E R N A T I O N A L
New York
Moscow
M M I T T E E
London
Madrid
Fly UP