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WHO/SDE/WSH/00.2
Operation and Maintenance
of rural water supply and
sanitation systems
A TRAINING PACKAGE FOR MANAGERS AND PLANNERS
Prepared by
François Brikké
Operation and Maintenance Network
of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council
IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
Delft, Netherlands
World Health Organization
Geneva, Switzerland
2000
IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
PO Box 2869
2601 CW Delft
The Netherlands
Tel: +31 (15) 219 29 39
Fax: +31 (15) 219 09 55
E-mail: [email protected]
World Health Organization
20 Avenue Appia
CH-1211 Geneva
Switzerland
Tel: +41 22 791 2111
Fax: +41 22 791 0746
Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council
c/o World Health Organization
Tel: +41 22 791 3685
Fax: +41 22 791 4847
Operation and Maintenance Network
c/o World Health Organization
Copyright © IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
and World Health Organization 2000
This document is not a formal publication of the World Health
Organization (WHO), and all rights are reserved by the Organization.
The document may, however, be freely reviewed, abstracted,
reproduced and translated, in part or in whole, but not for sale
nor for use in conjunction with commercial purposes.
Designed by minimum graphics
Printed in Malta
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
iii
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
v
vi
Part 1: Trainer’s guide
1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Welcome!
About the training package
How to be an effective facilitator
Getting prepared!
Evaluation
3
5
9
15
18
Part 2: Course contents
23
Module 1: Introduction
Unit 1: Course introduction
Unit 2: Presentations
Unit 3: Concepts and trends
Unit 4: Linking water, health, sanitation and environmental protection
25
27
32
35
48
Module 2: Situation analysis
Unit 1: Operation and maintenance requirements
Unit 2: Analysis of participation
Unit 3: Analysis of constraints
Unit 4: Analysis of objectives
61
63
107
110
119
Module 3: Towards sustainable operation and maintenance
Unit 1: Linking technology choice with operation and maintenance
Unit 2: Institutional set-up
Unit 3: Community management
Unit 4: Gender awareness
Unit 5: Cost recovery
Unit 6: Monitoring for effectiveness
Unit 7: Working and planning with communities
Unit 8: Field visit
125
127
136
158
180
190
214
234
264
Module 4: Planning
Unit 1: Planning tools
Unit 2: Individual assignments
Unit 3: Final presentations
271
273
284
287
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
v
Preface
The aim of Operation and Maintenance (O&M) programmes, as described in
this training package, is to improve the efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability
of water supply and sanitation services. Operation and Maintenance activities,
which encompass not only technical issues, but also managerial, social, financial
and institutional issues, must be directed towards the elimination or reduction of
the major constraints which prevent the achievement of sustainability.
This document and the training activities described in it are intended for
managers and planners who are concerned with the challenging problem of how
to implement effective operation and maintenance of rural water supply and
sanitation services in developing countries. In addition to the traditional management aspects of operation and maintenance, this training package highlights
the importance of community participation, with a right gender balance, in
order to make more efficient use of local human resources for sustainability.
The courses in this training package are based on participatory training methodologies, an important feature of which is to draw on the experiences of all the
participants, under the guidance of an experienced facilitator and resource
persons. The courses should be adapted to the local situation, and the modules
can be modified with additions or deletions according to local needs.
The package is based on material and documentation of global experiences
provided by various agencies and institutions in the water supply and sanitation
sector. This work was initiated in 1991 at a meeting in Oslo, Norway, which called
for an overall effort and the establishment of the Operation and Maintenance
Working Group (currently the Operation and Maintenance Network) of the Water
Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council.
We are confident that this document will make an effective and useful contribution to progress in the rural water supply and sanitation sector.
José A. Hueb
Coordinator
Operation and Maintenance Network
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
vi
Acknowledgements
This training package was first designed in 1991 by Teun Bastemeyer from the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, under the guidance and advice of the Operation
and Maintenance Working Group of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council. Subsequently, François Brikké—with the help of the following staff of IRC: Peter
Bury, Christine van Wijk, David Saunders, Jennifer Francis, Jo Smet, Michael Seager,
Kathleen Shordt and Ineke van Hooff, and Johnny Rojas of CINARA (Centro Interregional de Abastecimiento y Remoción de Agua) in Colombia—developed it through
various stages into the present version.
Professor Harry MacPherson and the staff of the National Directorate of Water of
Namibia carried out the first testing of this package in 1993. The staff of ETSHER (Ecole
Inter Etats des Techniciens Supérieurs de l’Hydraulique et de l’Equipement Rural) subsequently developed the French version of this course in Burkina Faso, while staff from
the Direcção Nacional de Águas of Mozambique, together with the Centro de Formação
Profisional de Águas y Saneamiento in Maputo, the Swiss Development Cooperation
agency, UNICEF, and the Netherlands Embassy in Maputo, helped to develop the Portuguese version. Some elements of the latest version of this package have been tested in
Vietnam by the staff of the Centre for Rural Water and Environmental Sanitation in
Hanoi and UNICEF.
Members of the Operation and Maintenance Network are thanked for their commitment and contribution to the development of this package, particularly Mr José Hueb,
Coordinator of this Network, for his constant support and encouragement. Special thanks
are due to Mr Franz Gahwiler from SKAT (Swiss Centre for Development Cooperation in
Technology and Management, St Gallen, Switzerland), for his excellent review of this
material, which now incorporates most of his comments.
Finally, the World Health Organization supported and promoted the development
and use of this training package through the WHO Regional and Country Offices in the
world. This has helped to make earlier versions of this document known to the potential
beneficiaries through national workshops and training courses.
PART 1
Trainer’s guide
1. Welcome!
How was this training package prepared?
Why “management” of operation and maintenance?
What is the structure of the package?
3
2. About the training package
5
What are the objectives?—What is the target group and
its size?—What is the duration of the course?—What are the
expected outputs?—What is the course methodology?
What is in the training package?—Proposed time-table
What are the course contents?
3. How to be an effective facilitator
Profile—Role of the facilitator—Communication
Facilitating discussions—The use of exercises—Overview
of the training tools which can be used by a facilitator
Role-playing—Brainstorming—Visualization
Trouble-shooting—Conflict resolution
9
4. Getting prepared!
Organization—Course contents—Getting started for the
session—Leisure and recreation—Some references on
participatory training
15
5. Evaluation
Evaluation form
18
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
3
1. Welcome!
How was this Training Package prepared?
In response to the shortcomings of the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade of the 1980s, a training package was designed in 1991 by a group of sector
experts from the Operation and Maintenance Working Group of the Water Supply and
Sanitation Collaborative Council. A draft version was developed by the IRC International
Water and Sanitation Centre in the Netherlands and tested in 1992 in Namibia. The
recommendations resulting from this field-test were then incorporated in the English
version, which was subsequently translated into French and Portuguese. The revised
version has since been implemented in various countries in Africa and Asia. In 1998 the
World Health Organization (WHO) and the IRC decided to update the package.
The present version is therefore the result of seven years of work and experience
worldwide. It incorporates recent developments and the latest findings and methodologies, which will help to improve the management of operation and maintenance (O&M)
of rural water supply and sanitation services in developing countries.
Why “Management of Operation and Maintenance”?
Operation and Maintenance. These two key words appeared in the answers of many sector professionals and community workers when they were asked about what could be
done to improve the performance, efficiency and sustainability of the rural water supply
and sanitation services in developing countries. It is well known that O&M has been
neglected in the past, or been discussed and introduced only after a project was completed. This neglect or delay in applying proper operation and maintenance has adversely affected the credibility of the investments made, the functioning of the services,
the well-being of rural populations, and the development of further projects.
However, the importance of O&M has gained considerable visibility over the past few
years, and it appears that policy-makers and project designers are now more conscious of
the direct links between improved O&M practices and the sustainability of water supply
and sanitation services. There is also greater recognition of the need to approach these
projects in a comprehensive way, emphasizing not only the design and construction but
also post-construction activities.
Professionals in the sector are realizing that the implementation of O&M is not just a
technical issue, but has social, community, gender, financial, institutional, political, managerial and environmental aspects as well. This is why the training package focuses on
management of operations and maintenance. O&M must be organized and planned at
both national and local levels, and should be managed at the community level with appropriate support from the local authorities and the private sector. This package looks
into these different issues, with the aim of raising awareness and providing guidelines on
O&M to project planners, programme managers and community specialists on how to
improve the performance, efficiency, and sustainability of their rural water supply and
sanitation services.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
4
What is the structure of the package?
The training package is designed as a guide to facilitators who will conduct courses or
workshops on management of operation and maintenance of rural water supply and
sanitation services for working-level managers, as well as engineers, social workers and
planners, and other specialists involved in this sector. The structure of the guide is
flexible, which permits adaptation to local circumstances—e.g. shortening certain
sessions, extending others, or adding locally relevant information. The package is
divided into two parts: 1) Trainer’s guide, 2) Course contents.
The Trainer’s guide provides guidelines and hints on how best to facilitate the course
sessions. Adult training calls for more than teaching; it should make use of the participants’ own experiences in a constructive way in order to effectively transmit basic relevant knowledge and experience. It was therefore considered pertinent to advise trainers
and facilitators on how to conduct sessions that would give optimum benefits to the
participants. Facilitation is an art, and you are invited to contact the sponsors and authors of this package, or other sector professionals, if your project or organization needs
further advice on training-of-trainers sessions.
The Course contents focus on the main issues which are relevant today to improve
O&M performance—such as the links between water, health, sanitation, and environmental protection; requirements and choice of technologies for operation and maintenance; institutional set-up; community management, including gender awareness and
working and planning with communities; cost recovery; and monitoring for effectiveness. The contents demonstrate the use of various managerial techniques, such as analysing participation and constraints, identifying the objectives, setting up a planning matrix
and indicators, planning with communities, and presenting a project. Experience has
shown that the quality of the course improves if it includes working towards a concrete
outcome, supported by awareness-raising which goes on throughout the course. At the
end of the course, the participants are asked to prepare an individual assignment based
on their experience and situation, and applying the concepts and approaches learned
during the course.
We extend a cordial welcome to all who will use this training package. You may contact WHO or IRC, at the addresses given below, if you have any queries or need further
information.
World Health Organization
Programme for Protection of
Human Health
Operation and Maintenance Network
20 Avenue Appia
1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
Fax 41-22-791 41 59
e-mail [email protected]
IRC
International Water and Sanitation
Centre
P.O. BOX 2869
2601 CW Delft
The Netherlands
Fax 31-15-219 09 55
e-mail [email protected]
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
5
2. About the training package
What are the objectives?
The general objective of the course in this training package is to improve water supply
and sanitation programmes and projects by enhancing their ability to sustain adequate
O&M activities.
The specific objectives are as follows:
■
■
■
■
to update knowledge on the operation and maintenance aspects of rural water
supply and sanitation programmes and projects;
to reinforce management skills with regard to sustainable operation and maintenance;
to specify approaches for better working and planning with communities;
to develop the capacity to plan for operation and maintenance in one’s own working environment through individual assignments.
What is the target group and its size?
This training package is designed for working-level managers including engineers,
planners, and development and social workers who are involved in the development and
management of water and sanitation projects.
The ideal number of participants, which permits intensive exchange of experiences,
is 12 to 15, but could go up to 20 if the course is guided by experienced trainers and
facilitators. Larger groups will need a team of at least two facilitators, because the work
will have to be divided frequently into two groups, some presentations and lectures being given to the whole group and participatory exercises to smaller groups. The course
includes the preparation of an assignment, individually or by the group, which will require individual and team coaching; the larger the group, the more assistance is required.
What is the duration of the course?
The course is designed for a minimum duration of 80 hours of classes, plus a field visit of
one day which is strongly recommended. This is feasible within a period of two weeks,
including time for any adaptations required by local circumstances and demand.
However, the course duration also depends on the participants’ professional level
and responsibilities. For example, high-level managers and directors may not be able to
afford more than a week away from their normal duties. While the cost per participant
increases if the course lasts longer, it can gain in quality if the participants are given more
time to reflect on key issues and to prepare their individual assignments.
What are the expected outputs?
Experience has shown that the participants benefit most from a course if they work to
produce a result, i.e. they work towards a defined product. Participants are therefore
expected to carry out an individual or group assignment at the end of the course, based
on their own situation and on what they learned during the course.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
6
What is the course methodology?
The course in this package makes use of participatory learning methodologies, as far as
possible, but also includes background information and overhead sheets for lectures and
presentations.
When learning, people remember 20% of what they hear, 40% of what they hear and
see, and 80% of what they discover by themselves. This calls for a change in the way of
teaching, from typical lecturing to a more participatory approach.
The participatory approach to training is based on the concept that professionals
learn more effectively when they are presented with activities which take into account
their knowledge and experience and which meet their needs. By being involved in this
process, both individuals and the group gain a new awareness of their potential, develop
greater self-confidence, and see new possibilities. They also become more critically aware
of the reasons that underlie their perceptions, attitudes and actions.
The training also proposes the use of a video film, “Prescription for Health”, produced by IDRC1 from Canada, which can be bought or hired through any Canadian
Embassy or High Commission, or by sending an order to the National Film Board of
Canada.
What is in the training package?
The training package is divided into two parts:
1. Trainer’s guide
2. Course contents.
The first part includes a welcome note and basic information about the training package. It provides guidelines on how to be an effective facilitator, as well as advice on the
preparation of course sessions and the field visit and on evaluation of the course.
The second part is divided into four modules which are subdivided into units, each
one linked to a particular theme. The first module is an introduction to concepts and
trends, and integration of water, health, sanitation and environmental protection. The
second proposes an analysis of the present situation of O&M. The third deals with the
main factors which can lead to effective O&M. And the fourth module gives practical
guidance on how to plan for effective O&M.
The course follows a logical sequence of progressive learning, through raising awareness in Module 1; situation analysis in Module 2; learning in Module 3; and application
of tools and knowledge in Module 4.
Each unit is organized in the same way, according to the following format:
1
1. Outline of
session
2. Notes for the
facilitator
3. Overhead
sheets
4. Background
information
■
■
■
■
■ Detailed review
of each step of
the session,
with exercises
■ Proposed
text for
transparencies
to be used
during a
session
■ Summary of
new concepts
■ Content material
for presentations
■ References for
further reading
Objectives
Methodology
Materials
Handouts
IDRC, P.O. Box 8500, Ottawa ONK1G 3H9, Canada. Tel: +1 (613) 236 6163; e-mail: [email protected]
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
7
Proposed time-table
Week 1
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Session A
Introduction
O&M
requirements
Analysis of
constraints
Community
management
Monitoring for
effectiveness
Session B
Presentations
O&M
requirements
Analysis of
objectives
Community
management
Monitoring for
effectiveness
Session C
Concepts and
trends
Analysis of
participation
Linking technology choice
with O&M
Cost recovery
Gender
awareness
Session D
Linking water,
health, sanitation
and environmental protection
Analysis of
constraints
Institutional
set-up
Cost recovery
Preparation of
field trip
Daily evaluation
Daily evaluation
Daily evaluation
Daily evaluation
Week 2
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Session A
Field trip
Working with
communities
Individual
assignments
Preparation of
presentations
Presentations
Session B
Field trip
Working with
communities
Individual
assignments
Preparation of
presentations
Presentations
Session C
Lessons learnt
from field trip
Planning tools
Individual
assignments
Presentations
Evaluation
Closing
Session D
Lessons learnt
from field trip
Planning tools
Individual
assignments
Presentations
Daily evaluation
Daily evaluation
Daily evaluation
Each session is planned to last about two hours, depending on local circumstances
and demand. The structure of the course is flexible enough to allow modifications and
adaptations. For example, the one-week course in Vietnam turned out to be more of an
awareness-raising workshop than a course. While in Burkina Faso, the course was implemented for a period of three weeks, which permitted a longer field study and gave more
time for individual assignments.
What are the course contents?
Module 1: Introduction
Unit 1: Course introduction
Unit 2: Presentations
Unit 3: Concepts and trends
Unit 4: Linking water, health, sanitation and environmental protection
Module 2: Situation analysis
Unit 1: O&M requirements
Unit 2: Analysis of participation
Unit 3: Analysis of constraints
Unit 4: Analysis of objectives
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
8
Module 3: Towards sustainable O&M
Unit 1: Linking technology choice with O&M
Unit 2: Institutional set-up
Unit 3: Community management
Unit 4: Gender awareness
Unit 5: Cost recovery
Unit 6: Monitoring for effectiveness
Unit 7: Working and planning with communities
Unit 8: Field visit
Module 4: Planning
Unit 1: Planning tools
Unit 2: Individual assignments
Unit 3: Final presentations
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
9
3. How to be an effective facilitator 1
Profile
The facilitator should be a professional (resource person or trainer) who is acquainted
with participatory training methodologies. This is because the course is based on using
facilitation techniques rather than “conventional” teaching techniques, although the
latter (such as lectures and presentations) are not excluded.
If the facilitator is going to be involved through the whole course, he/she should
preferably be knowledgeable about new developments in the water and sanitation sector.
It is advisable to have a team of facilitators rather than just one because many of the
activities require the participants to work in small groups. It is sometimes necessary and
useful to have a facilitator to work with each small group, as well as to coach each participant during the individual assignments.
Role of the facilitator
In the conventional teaching methodology, the teacher presents a set of concepts and
provides students with exercises for assimilation—in a “top-down” approach. In the participatory approach to training, the role of the facilitator is to facilitate the process of
learning, using his/her own experiences and those of the participants in order to raise
awareness or transmit knowledge on a particular subject—in a “sharing” approach.
Facilitation works best when certain values are accepted and practised not only by the
facilitator, but also by the entire group—values such as democracy (each person has the
opportunity to participate without prejudice), responsibility (each person is responsible
for his/her experiences and behaviour), and cooperation (the facilitator and participants work together to achieve the same collective goal).
As a facilitator, you can influence the group dynamics and discussions by how you
present your information, what kind of atmosphere you set within the group, and your
attitudes towards the people you are working with.
Many participants will be unfamiliar with facilitation as a leadership style. You should
make sure everyone in the group understands what your role is. Your own attitude towards your skills and resources should be a humble one. Demonstrate to the participants
that their opinions count, by respecting their ideas as if they were your own.
Communication
Communication is the essential ingredient of any group. Your effectiveness as a facilitator
depends on your ability to communicate well with the group and to help the group
members to communicate effectively with each other. Some factors will enable you to
communicate better, such as:
1
This section contains extracts from A manual for group facilitators, by Brian Auvine et al., published by the Center for Conflict
Resolution, 731 State Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53703, USA.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
10
■
■
■
■
■
Your language (making sure that the terms you use are easily understood by the
group)
Your style (the way you dress and interact with others)
The way you listen (when someone is talking, you are often not really listening but
thinking about what you are going to say in answer; therefore, when you listen to
someone, try not to immediately evaluate what is being said in terms of how it
affects you; instead, try to understand what it means from the other person’s perspective)
Being aware of what is happening in the group (restlessness, silence, attention,
postures)
Giving feedback (after an exercise, a discussion, or a session, it helps the group to
be made aware of the progress made).
Facilitating discussions
Your role as a facilitator in a discussion is also important. Here are some hints which
could enhance your work in facilitating discussions:
1. Everyone should know exactly what the discussion is about, and what is the reason
for having it.
2. Use questions to stimulate discussion. The following provocative “open” questions
enable the facilitator to encourage a group to find ideas in a creative way: “What is
similar? What can be changed? Why? How? Who? When? By which means?”. Avoid
“closed” questions requiring “yes” or “no” answers, which are unsuitable for group
discussions.
3. Prepare questions in advance.
4. Relate the discussion to the participant’s experience (it is difficult for people to
feel involved in a discussion which is highly abstract or beyond their own experience; give examples from field experiences).
5. List ideas on a board as they are proposed, and regroup or summarize them.
6. Clarify and interpret (you may sometimes rephrase what has been said to make it
clearer).
7. Keep the discussion focused on the subject (your role may include reminding the
group when the discussion strays off the subject or goes into matters not in the
agenda that was agreed on at the beginning).
8. Keep track of time (it may be your role to make the group aware of how the discussion is proceeding and when it may be time to move on).
9. Use humour to break tension and boredom.
The use of exercises
Exercises are group activities, usually designed to aid learning and awareness. Exercises
can be used to illustrate a concept or demonstrate a specific point, to promote self-awareness, to stimulate thought and discussion, or to train participants in a certain skill.
Select exercises that fit the group and its goals, and be sure you know why you are
using a particular exercise. Be familiar with the exercise by previewing it before you use
it; indeed, you should know what it will accomplish and how that happens. Do not present
participants with a battery of exercises, all designed to make much the same point.
Giving instructions is a very important part of using exercises. The way you introduce
an exercise can make a big difference to the group’s understanding; you should include
an explanation of the objectives, a description of what exactly the participants are supposed to do, and an estimation of how much time the exercise will take.
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
11
You should also know your own role during the exercise. Are you going to participate,
or simply observe, or remove yourself entirely from the scene? At the end of the exercise,
it is important for the participants and you to reflect on the results and how they relate to
the participants’ own day-to-day situation.
Overview of training tools which can be used by a facilitator1
The various tools described in the Table below are training techniques which are most
commonly found in adult learning sessions. This course will use most of the techniques
described, and it is recommended that facilitators should be familiar with a new technique before using it. Some reference documents are listed at the end of this section.
TRAINING TOOLS
REMARKS
➽ Group discussion/Conversation
A discussion is a free exchange of knowledge,
ideas and opinions on a particular subject.
A conversation will be more structured and
prepared in advance.
■ Optimal use: to introduce a subject; a structured conversation
helps to focus thinking.
■ Advantages: group involvement; starts the thinking process.
■ Disadvantages: risk of unfocused discussions and no change in
ideas; time shortage; needs preparation.
➽ Brainstorming
The facilitator or an assistant writes down all
the contributions on a board. Quality and
substance are evaluated by the group afterwards.
■ Optimal use: common method to help group members to think of
possible changes or give new orientations.
■ Advantages: stimulates creativity, expands imagination.
■ Disadvantages: answers cannot always be implemented;
effort needed can be greater than expected.
➽ Feedback
Informing people what they did in a certain
exercise, or role-play or other action in order
to let them know how things can be improved
■ Optimal use: for creating awareness on participant’s skills and
performance.
■ Advantages: participants become eager to learn.
■ Disadvantages: possible distrust without good feedback.
➽ Lecture
An internally consistent, rationally clear
presentation, adapted to a specific audience by
using visual images, verbal illustrations and
other tools.
■ Optimal use: for transfer of model, concept or framework.
■ Advantages: opportunity for transfer of knowledge within a
short space of time.
■ Disadvantages: monologue; requires good preparation in order
to keep attention.
➽ Demonstration
Letting participants go through an event that
illustrates the theme of a session. Participants
are asked to participate and at the same time
observe what is happening.
■ Optimal use: start of a session on a topic which needs
sensitization or awareness-raising.
■ Advantages: effective way to raise awareness in a short period
of time.
■ Disadvantages: can easily fail, if not adapted to the group.
➽ Field visit
Participants are taken out into a real life
situation and get the opportunity to observe
some elements linked to the course.
■ Optimal use: to show real life situation.
■ Advantages: helps to clarify concepts and reach a common
understanding; excellent for group dynamics.
■ Disadvantages: takes much work and time to organize.
➽ Reading assignments
During the course, participants are asked to
read relevant information.
■ Optimal use: Creates opportunity to digest written material;
can be given for evening reading.
■ Advantages: easy way to cover some material.
■ Disadvantages: slows down dynamics if done in class;
participants’ understanding may have to be checked.
➽ Case study
A history or example, with relevant details, is
examined by the participants. They have to
identify the problems and alternative solutions.
■ Optimal use: to practise analytical skills and reflect on a situation as
a group.
■ Advantages: good learning experience when successful;
group reaches a common understanding.
■ Disadvantages: difficult to choose or design an appropriate
case study; needs preparation, time and experience.
1
Adapted from Training of trainers: methods for experiential learning, by F. Little & J. van de Geer, P.O. Box 4040, 6803 EA Arnhem,
Netherlands.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
12
TRAINING TOOLS
REMARKS
➽ Games
Participants are presented with information and rules
about a particular situation, and the group tries to go
through a simulation of this situation.
■ Optimal use: to practise and simulate a given situation.
■ Advantages: fun, dynamic.
■ Disadvantages: careful preparation needed with good and clear
instructions; unsure outcome; risk of having participants not taking it
seriously.
➽ Exercises
Participants are asked to undertake a particular task,
following lines laid down by the facilitator, in order to
practise skills or test one’s knowledge.
■ Optimal use: to teach complex skills or concepts.
■ Advantages: creates confidence; very practical.
■ Disadvantages: must be realistic, relevant and motivating.
➽ Role-play
Participants assume an identity other then their own
to cope with real or hypothetical problems and
situations.
■ Optimal use: to demonstrate or practise a situation which the
participants are likely to face.
■ Advantages: strong participation and surprising outcomes.
■ Disadvantages: hiding behind role description; needs “actors” focusing
on the subject required.
➽ Small workshops
Participants gather in small groups and come to a
conclusion by brainstorming, identifying problems
and formulating recommendations.
■ Optimal use: to help the group to take decisions or make plans and
formulate recommendations at the end of a major event.
■ Advantages: shared vision.
■ Disadvantages: experience needed in using tools and in facilitating.
➽ Individual assignment
Participants are asked to examine in depth their own
situation, and to apply what they have learned in
an action plan.
■ Optimal use: integrates learning within one’s own situation.
■ Advantages: participants analyse their situation and prepare for their
return.
■ Disadvantages: takes time and requires coaching.
Role-playing1
Role-playing is a training technique in which the participants assume an identity other
than their own, in order to experience and deal with a real or hypothetical situation or
problem. It can be employed in almost any training context, e.g. to broaden a primarily
teaching-oriented design.
In playing their roles, the participants act out behaviour patterns which they believe
are characteristic of those roles in specific social situations. For example, during the
course, a role-playing sequence is proposed between two actors, “an engineer” and “a
community member”, in order to illustrate the process of resistance to change.
This way of simulating reality eliminates many of the risks inherent in real life, while
retaining many other aspects of the interaction which are relevant. Role-playing thus
permits testing out different ways of behaviour in a given situation.
The role-playing session should start with the facilitator briefing all participants—
first outlining the situation which is be acted through role-playing, and then giving a
concise description of the characters involved. At the end of the role-playing, the actors
and audience discuss and draw conclusions from what has taken place.
In planning for a role-playing session, you should discuss with the participants the
basic principle of the approach, the problem to be acted, and the message to be conveyed. These points should be kept in mind while preparing the role-playing with the
actors prior to the session.
1
Adapted from: Experience with newer techniques for training managers, by Sidney Mailick & Nancy A. Bord, published by the United
Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR).
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
13
Brainstorming1
Brainstorming produces ideas, explanations and interpretations. In an organized “storming of thoughts”, a small group of participants can put forward many possible suggestions on a precisely formulated theme. The method stimulates intuitive seeking and
spontaneous creative associations.
Hints on preparation: the topic must be formulated precisely, with a clear statement
on who is to participate and the time available. For the actual brainstorming there are
some definite rules: no discussion, but note every idea without criticizing, and encourage the development of combinations and associations of ideas. Indeed, no one has a
monopoly of good ideas. The contributed suggestions are written on cards and put up
on a poster or board, then grouped, analysed and evaluated by a small panel. Some sort
of classification is useful, such as “immediately feasible” or “needs more development”.
Visualization
The visualization method uses written cards which are pasted or pinned on posters,
pinboards or other surfaces in a specific order. This facilitates a clear structuring of the
meeting, discussions, and workshops and the recording of statements in a concise and
visible way. Concentration and attention are improved considerably and even shy participants are able to take part actively. Visualization makes the discussion more objective
and even enhances the preceding steps. Evaluation and prioritizing of options are much
easier when using a visible presentation.
Trouble-shooting
When there is not enough time to do what you had planned. This is the most common
problem you are likely to encounter. When your agenda will not fit into the time you
have, get the group to assign probable time limits to each section remaining, while
prioritizing items on the agenda. Ask one person in the group to be responsible for
keeping track of time, and to remind the group when the time limit is close or has been
reached. When it is apparent that there is definitely not enough time, discuss alternatives
with the group—such as prolonging the meeting, scheduling a later one, etc. Avoid forcing the pace in a limited time, or “stuffing” the participants with all that remains to be
covered, or else the session could rapidly deteriorate.
When an exercise flops. The first thing to do is to admit it, point out where your
expectations let you down, and find out the reactions of others. You should discuss what
could have happened and, in this way, learn a valuable lesson. After this, prepare to
switch to something completely different, which will focus everyone’s attention on another subject.
Your session and material are too simple or too complex for the group. If what you
are saying is too simple for the group, boredom will result. If what you are saying is too
complex, you can expect confusion and blank looks. Unfortunately, blank looks and
boredom look remarkably alike, so it is not always easy to figure out which of these you
are dealing with. Here are some points which will help you to be alert to the group’s level
of comprehension: a) before starting an exercise, ask the participants if they have done
anything similar; b) begin a session by asking for an account of the group’s previous
experience; c) pause regularly to put questions to the group; d) avoid using “jargon” or
technical terms without prior explanation; and e) consider carefully the questions put by
the participants because these usually indicate whether they have understood or not.
1
From: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners, published in 1993 by Swiss Development
Cooperation, Evaluation Service, CH 3003 Berne, Switzerland.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
14
Conflict resolution
Conflicts can arise in any group. They should first be treated as something natural, and
sometimes even useful, because they can force a group to become more aware of the way
the group works and thus encourage change and growth. However, conflicts can be destructive, hurt people’s feelings, and destroy efforts to reach a common goal, as well as
inhibit full participation within the group.
There are many points to consider in seeking solutions to a conflict. The main one is
to try to sort out real disagreements from perceptual disagreements. Some disagreements could result from a wrong perception of a situation. In this case, clarification and
information can help. However, many conflicts are the result of poor communication or
misunderstandings about goals and expectations.
Once you have identified a conflict and understood its nature, you will be in a better
position to decide what kind of behaviour is appropriate to adopt. If the conflict is serious, stay calm and trust your intuition. You may want to intervene as a facilitator, but
before attempting to do this, consider your options carefully. Beware of your own biases
and weaknesses, and be sure that you are not going to overreact. Consider whether the
problem can be dealt with by proposing a break (and discussing it later in another place
privately), or by exercising restraint and being patient (waiting till the difficult moment
passes), or by getting help (from someone with experience who is not involved in the
conflict). Does the whole group appear to perceive the problem? During a crisis, people’s feelings are especially important. So, allow them to express their feelings, but do
not get emotionally involved.
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
15
4. Getting prepared!
Organization
A certain amount of preparatory work is required and should begin preferably six months
in advance, e.g. fixing the dates of the course. This will allow those involved to fit these
dates into their work schedule and plans. In setting the dates, account has to be taken of
public and religious holidays and important meetings or events which the participants
will have to attend.
Secretarial support greatly facilitates the organization of the course. All information
and correspondence about the planning, implementation and evaluation of the course
should be filed in an orderly manner. During the course, the secretary will be required to
make administrative arrangements and contacts, make photocopies, and word-process
the work produced by the participants and the facilitator. A record of the work produced
throughout the course should be made and kept.
The accommodation should include 1) a large meeting room for the plenary sessions, 2) separate rooms for the working groups, and 3) a place for serving refreshments,
as well as lunches, during breaks. Make sure that the meeting room is available for the
duration of the whole course and is not noisy, and has adequate ventilation and light,
sufficient power points for a video and overhead projector, and enough space on the
walls to stick up paper sheets or posters.
All teaching aids, equipment and stationery should be ordered well in advance of the
course. They will include a) a white or black board; b) sufficient marker pens for white
boards, to be used by the facilitator and participants; c) a flip-chart stand and paper; d)
masking tape (removable) for sticking cards or paper on a wall; e) large pieces of carton
paper (different colours), which can be made into cards by cutting them to the size
required; f) an overhead projector with transparencies; g) a screen or white wall for
projection; h) a video recorder and monitor; i) access to a photocopy machine; j) note
pads, pencils and pens; and k) a pinboard, paper and pins.
A certificate of attendance should be prepared in advance, signed by the relevant
authorities or sponsors of the course, which is given to all participants who complete the
course.
An invitation should be sent to prospective participants through the appropriate channels of your organization. The invitation should include clear statements on the course’s
objectives, structure and duration, the importance of full-time attendance, arrangements
for accommodating and transporting the participants, insurance and medical coverage,
costs, and per diem (if available). The invitation should include a form to be filled in and
returned containing information on personal data and education, curriculum vitae,
present function and job description, and expectations from the course, as well as a
request for financial sponsorship if available.
The field visit, which is part of the course, gives the participants an opportunity to
look at the operation and maintenance arrangements in a particular community or situation. To be successful the visit has to be planned in advance, so that the local authority
and community are given the date and time of arrival as well as details of the programme.
Arrangements for transport and food and drink should also be made. The exact pro-
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
16
gramme will depend on the distance to be travelled and the local community’s size and
willingness to be involved in the field visit. If the course group is large, it will have to be
divided to make it easier for the participants and the community.
It is suggested that the best time for the field visit is in the morning. Many activities
associated with rural water supply take place very early in the morning—e.g. the women
may traditionally collect water before or at sunrise, and operators will open the valves,
start the pumps, and dose the tanks with chlorine, etc. at the start of the day in order to
provide sufficient water for early collections. The next peak period for water collection
may be in the late afternoon or early evening, which is too late for a field visit. Special
arrangements may have to be made to ensure the group’s arrival early in the morning at
the selected site, and the participants should be ready to make an early start.
For further details about the field visit, see Unit 8 of Module 3, page 264.
Course contents
Facilitators should be thoroughly familiar with all the material in the learning package.
In addition, because of the importance of adaptation to the local circumstances, it is
proposed that the facilitator researches all relevant themes and includes this information (taken from project reports, technical or policy documents, etc.) in the course.
One or more experts with experience in the subject and in new developments could
be listed as resource persons and invited to give a lecture or make a presentation during
the course. It is important that these persons should be fully briefed about the course’s
objectives, concepts and main messages. The course unit which corresponds to the presentation should also be sent as a reference or example. These arrangements should be
made well in advance.
Some countries may have difficulties in gaining access to relevant additional information, and in identifying suitable resource persons. Specialized universities or agencies in
your country may be consulted. Or contact WHO or IRC, or other sector organizations
and external support agencies (ESA) for further information and assistance in organizing a training-of-trainers course.
Getting started for the session
While planning for your session, make sure that you know exactly what you want to accomplish and that all the activities relate to that goal. The material you use should be
relevant to the objective of the session and properly understood by the participants.
Material should be presented in a logical order. After reviewing all the objectives and
contents of the session, determine the time needed for each segment and make your
agenda flexible. Plan to introduce variety in the pace and methods used. Every session
should start with making introductions, discussing plans, and defining expectations, and
end with a synthesis and summary of the session.
Before you begin, spend some time alone by yourself and make sure your agenda is
clear in your mind. Seating arrangements are important, and you must decide whether
the participants will be seated in a U-shape round a long table or in rows without desks,
depending on the exercise to be carried out.
As you enter the room, the first few moments will influence your interaction with the
group through your mutual perceptions and impressions. It is important to arrive on
time, or even early. Besides setting an example by always being punctual, you will be
showing courtesy and respect to the group.
Your introduction should include your credentials (justifying your being there!). This
is also an opportunity to present yourself not only as an “expert”, but also as a “person”
and “facilitator”. It may be difficult to remember all the participants’ names immedi-
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
17
ately, so you can have their names written on stiff paper in front of their places, and they
could also carry name labels on the front of their clothing.
The first session each day should begin with a review of the previous day’s work. This
can be done in a relaxed way, with some humour, by asking the participants to recall what
they did, and what were the main messages conveyed at that time. The facilitator’s role
will be to explain the link between the previous topic and the new one.
Leisure and recreation
Some thought should be given to the organization of free time, during which the participants will interact and can contribute to team building. Social evenings and excursions
are also particularly important for participants who are away from their families during
the course.
Some references on participatory training
■
■
■
■
CEDPA (1995). Training trainers for development: conducting a workshop on participatory training techniques. Washington, DC, USA, Centre for Development and Population Activities.
Narayan D, Srinivasan L. (1994). Participatory development tool kit: training materials
for agencies and communities. Washington, DC, World Bank.
Servaes J, White SA. eds. (1996). Participatory communication for social change. New
Delhi, India, Sage Publications.
Thompson J, Pretty JN, Scoones I, Guijt I. (1995). A trainer’s guide for participatory
learning and action. London, International Institute for Environment and Development.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
18
5. Evaluation
Evaluation should be carried out daily, with a final evaluation at the end of the course.
The object of the daily evaluations is to improve the group process by letting the
participants express how they feel about what is going on. This is often the only time
when some participants will feel comfortable enough to express their ideas. It also makes
a good ending to the day’s work. However, it is not a compulsory activity which has to be
done every day; a good idea is to install a “mood barometer”, on which each participant
can put a sticker on a scale, expressing his/her feelings about the day. Daily evaluations
can help to improve the sessions in the future (with regard to facilitation, exercises,
contents), as well as to identify possible points which will need to be reinforced during
what is left of the course. The daily evaluation can be carried out through 1) an informal
discussion, 2) a focused conversation, or 3) a daily evaluation form.
The informal discussion will start with questions which you will pose. This gives you
the opportunity to ask for comments and make clarifications. This procedure may not
reflect the whole group’s views because some participants will be silent. Examples of
questions are: “What went well in ...?” “What could be improved?” “What specifically do
you think you have gained from today’s sessions?” “Were your expectations met today?”
“Why?” “Why not?”
The focused conversation will start with an exercise in which all participants write two
“positive” and two “critical” comments about the day’s session in general. Each participant is given two cards for the “positive” comments, and two cards for the “critical” comments (cards should be of different colours, e.g. yellow for “negative” and green for
“critical”; only one comment per card). All the cards are then pinned or taped on a
board, and grouped by categories as they are submitted. The results are discussed with
the whole group, who will be asked to make clarifications and comments. This method
allows every participant to express him/herself. As this type of evaluation takes considerable time, it might be used once or twice during the course.
A daily evaluation form can be prepared, on which each participant ranks the
content, relevance and presentation of each session along a scale from 1 to 5 (1 = poor,
2 = limited, 3 = reasonable, 4 = good, 5 = excellent), or another system of grading. If the
facilitator adopts this method, he/she will have to share the results of this evaluation
before starting the next morning’s session.
A final evaluation form, which may be anonymous, is proposed in the next pages to
evaluate in detail all the different aspects of the course. The results of this evaluation
should be included in the final report of the course.
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
19
Evaluation form
Management of operation and maintenance in rural drinking water supply
and sanitation
Please mark with a tick, where applicable.
1. What do you think about the overall length of the course?
■
Far too long
■
Too long
■
Just right
■
Too short
■
Far too short
2. During the course, you worked from Monday till Friday from 9.00 a.m. till 5.00 p.m. What is your
opinion about this time schedule?
3. What do you think of the allocation of time for the different components of this course?
Far too much
Too much
Just right
Too little
Lectures
Exercises
Discussions
Individual work
Leisure
Additional comments:
4. How would you grade the relevance of the course to your country’s needs?
■
Excellent
Comments:
■
Good
■
Reasonable
■
Poor
■
Not relevant
Far too little
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
20
5. What do you think of the balance between theory and practice?
■
Far too much theory
■
Too much practice
■
■
■
Too much theory
Just right
Far too much practice
6. How did you find this course in general?
■
Too difficult
■
Difficult
■
■
Just right
Easy
■
Too easy
7. Have your expectations, which you had when you applied to join the course, been realized?
■
Completely
■
Largely
■
Partly
■
To some degree
■
Not at all
8. To what extent, in your opinion, did this course achieve its objectives?
Objectives
Completely
Largely
Partly
Hardly
Not at all
1. Upgrade knowledge on the O&M
aspects of RWS&S
2. Reinforce management skills with
regard to O&M
3. Specify approaches to working and
planning with communities
4. Develop the capacity to plan for
O&M in one’s own project
9. How useful has this course been to the specific requirements of your own job?
■
Very useful
■
Useful
■
Of some use
■
Of limited use
■
Not useful
10. Please name any technique or method from this course which you would like to introduce
or apply in your own organization.
11. How relevant, on average, were the handouts and reading material provided, most of which
you have probably examined?
■
Highly relevant
■
Quite relevant
■
Of some relevance
■
Of limited relevance
■
Not relevant
PART 1. TRAINER’S GUIDE
21
12. In the list below, please give a mark for each topic or session dealt with during the course,
with regard to its relevance and quality. Make additional remarks, if necessary.
(1 = poor, 2 = limited, 3 = reasonable, 4 = good, 5 = excellent)
Topic or session
Relevance Quality
Remarks
(from 1 to 5) (from 1 to 5)
Course introduction
Presentations
Concepts and trends
Links between W, H, S, E*
O&M technical requirements
Analysis of participation
Analysis of constraints
Institutional set-up
Community management
Gender awareness
Cost recovery
Monitoring for effectiveness
Working with communities
Field visit
Capacity-building
Setting up objectives
Planning tools
Individual assignments
Final presentations
* Water, Health, Sanitation and Environment
13. What are the major professional problems in your work, if there are any, which were NOT
discussed sufficiently in this training course?
14. What was your experience of working relations with the following:
Main facilitator(s)
Other training staff
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Stimulating
Cooperative
Neutral
Distant
Difficult
Comments:
Stimulating
Cooperative
Neutral
Distant
Difficult
Administration
■
■
■
■
■
Stimulating
Cooperative
Neutral
Distant
Difficult
Participants
■
■
■
■
■
Stimulating
Cooperative
Neutral
Distant
Difficult
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION SYSTEMS
22
15. How do you rate the internal organization and logistical support during the course?
■
Excellent
■
Good
■
Reasonable
■
Poor
■
Not applicable
Comments:
16. How satisfied were you with the accommodation (classroom, etc.)?
■
Very much
■
Much
■
Reasonable
■
Not much
■
Not at all
Comments:
17. Please write down any suggestions for improving this course.
PART 2
Course contents
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
24
Module 1: Introduction
Unit 1: Course introduction
Unit 2: Presentations
Unit 3: Concepts and trends
Unit 4: Linking water, health, sanitation and
environmental protection
Module 2: Situation analysis
Unit 1: Operation and maintenance requirements
Unit 2: Analysis of participation
Unit 3: Analysis of constraints
Unit 4: Analysis of objectives
Module 3: Towards sustainable operation and
maintenance
Unit 1: Linking technology choice with operation
and maintenance
Unit 2: Institutional set-up
Unit 3: Community management
Unit 4: Gender awareness
Unit 5: Cost recovery
Unit 6: Monitoring for effectiveness
Unit 7: Working and planning with communities
Unit 8: Field visit
Module 4: Planning
Unit 1: Planning tools
Unit 2: Individual assignments
Unit 3: Final presentations
25
27
32
35
48
61
63
107
110
119
125
127
136
158
180
190
214
234
264
271
273
284
287
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS • MODULE 1
25
MODULE 1
Introduction
Unit 1: Course introduction
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheet
27
27
27
29
Unit 2: Presentations
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Exercise sheet
32
32
32
34
Unit 3: Concepts and trends
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead and exercise sheets
4. Background information
4.1 Operation and maintenance in the context of sustainability
4.2 Factors which contribute to sustainability and to effective
operation and maintenance
4.3 Processes which influence sustainable operation and
maintenance
35
35
35
38
45
45
Unit 4: Linking water, health, sanitation and environmental protection
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead and exercise sheets
4. Background information
4.1 Why is behaviour not changed by conventional hygiene
education?
4.2 What motivates people to improve their hygiene?
4.3 Experiences in better water resource management
48
48
48
51
55
45
46
55
55
56
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
27
Unit 1: Course introduction
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To introduce the participants to one another
■ To review the participants’ fears and expectations
■ To reach a common understanding of the course’s objectives and structure
➽ Methodology
1. Welcome address
2. Exercise for group interaction
3. Group discussion on expectations and fears
4. Interactive presentation on course objectives, methodology and programme
➽ Materials
✔ Transparencies on the course’s objectives and programme
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Stationery for each participant, including note pad, binder, pencil, eraser, pen and
marker
✔ The binder should contain the following: the course’s objectives and programme, full
list of participants, and practical information concerning food, lodging, transport,
recreation areas, access to telephone, medical help, and contact person for information and emergencies.
➽ Handouts
✔ Information on the place where the course is being held (optional)
2. Notes for the facilitator
Welcome address and introduction
The welcome address can be given by the Director of the Institute where the course is
being held, or by a well-known specialist. The facilitator’s introduction must clearly state
his/her credentials and role, including some personal facts that would interest the
participants, and he/she presents the team who will be working with the participants
through the whole course. This is followed by an explanation of how the session will
proceed, its objectives, and the methodology.
Interactive exercise
One way of making introductions is to ask the participants to pair up and spend a few
minutes introducing themselves to each other. The facilitator then goes to each pair
and, in turn, one of them will introduce the other, giving his/her name, nationality,
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
28
place of residence, education, professional function, and one or two personal facts. In a
course where the participants are meeting for the first time, this approach allows everyone to get acquainted with at least one person very quickly, and helps the participants to
be relaxed and informal. At the end of this exercise, the participants are asked to write
the name by which they would like to be called during the course on a folded sheet of
paper, which will be placed in front of their respective places.
Expectations and fears
A group discussion can be started by asking the participants, “What are your expectations from this course?”, or “What did you think you would get out of this course at the
time when you registered for it?” If no one volunteers to speak, the facilitator chooses
someone with whom to start developing ideas, which are written on the flip chart. If any
statement is not expressed clearly, these persons should be helped so that it becomes
clear. Once the group’s views have been stated, the facilitator summarizes the participants’ expectations and relates them to the objectives of the course.
The same procedure is followed with regard to anxieties within the group concerning
the course’s content, logistics, follow-up, etc., which can be started by asking the participants, “Have you any worries about this course?” Removal of such fears is important and
allows the facilitator to get to know the group’s strengths and weaknesses, and to help
the participants with any problems or difficulties that may arise.
Course’s objectives, structure, methodology and programme
The facilitator describes the course’s objectives, structure, methodology and programme,
using the overhead projector and transparencies (see Part 1, Trainer’s Guide, in the
section “About the training package”, page 5). In this process the participants’ expectations, which were discussed earlier (see above), should be related to the programme’s
objectives. Time must be set aside for questions and clarifications, so that the objectives
will be clear to all and any doubts can be dispelled. However, some of the expectations
may not be met, and some concerns may remain. These matters should be discussed with
the group, and the facilitator should help to clear up any misunderstandings. Questions
on technical matters, e.g. a maintenance plan for diesel engines, could be deferred, if
feasible, till the appropriate session during the course. If any concerns still remain, the
matter should be referred to the course organizers and administration.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
29
3. Overhead sheets: Sheet 1
Course objectives
General objective
➽ To contribute to the sustainability of water
supply and sanitation programmes and
projects in rural areas
Specific objectives
● To update knowledge on O&M issues
● To reinforce management skills on sustainable
O&M
● To create specific approaches for better work
and planning with communities
● To develop individual assignments based on
the lessons learnt and each participant’s
workplace
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
30
Overhead sheet 2
Course outline
Module 1:
Unit 1:
Unit 2:
Unit 3:
Unit 4:
Introduction
Course introduction
Presentations
Concepts and trends
Links between water, health, sanitation and
environment
Module 2:
Unit 1:
Unit 2:
Unit 3:
Unit 4:
Situation analysis
O&M requirements
Analysis of participation
Analysis of constraints
Analysis of objectives
Module 3:
Unit 1:
Unit 2:
Unit 3:
Unit 4:
Unit 5:
Unit 6:
Unit 7:
Unit 8:
Towards sustainable O&M
Linking technology choice with O&M
Institutional set-up
Community management
Gender awareness
Cost recovery
Monitoring for effectiveness
Working and planning with communities
Field visit
Module 4:
Unit 1:
Unit 2:
Unit 3:
Planning
Planning tools
Individual assignments
Final presentations
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
31
Overhead sheet 3
Proposed timetable
Week 1
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Session A
Introduction
O&M
requirements
Analysis of
constraints
Community
management
Monitoring for
effectiveness
Session B
Presentations
O&M
requirements
Analysis of
objectives
Community
management
Monitoring for
effectiveness
Session C
Concepts and
trends
Analysis of
participation
Linking
technology
choice with
O&M
Cost recovery
Gender
awareness
Session D
Linking water,
health,
sanitation and
environmental
protection
Analysis of
constraints
Institutional
set-up
Cost recovery
Preparation
of field trip
Daily
evaluation
Daily
evaluation
Daily
evaluation
Daily
evaluation
Daily
evaluation
Week 2
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Session A
Field trip
Working with
communities
Individual
assignments
Preparation of
presentations
Presentations
Session B
Field trip
Working with
communities
Individual
assignments
Preparation of
presentations
Presentations
Session C
Lessons learnt Planning
from field trip tools
Individual
assignments
Presentations
Evaluation
Closing
Session D
Lessons learnt Planning
from field trip tools
Individual
assignments
Presentations
Daily
evaluation
Daily
evaluation
Daily
evaluation
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
32
Unit 2: Presentations
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To enable the participants to present their personal experiences with operation
and maintenance
➽ Methodology
1. Individual or group exercise
2. Presentations by the participants
➽ Materials
✔ Transparencies on the forms to be filled in
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Large sheets of paper
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
➽ Handouts
✔ Information about operation and maintenance services in the host country
✔ Forms for the exercise on initial presentations
2. Notes for the facilitator
The presentations allow the participants to share their personal experiences in different
backgrounds with the group, and to give an overview of the problems which they have
encountered or are likely to encounter in their professional life. This approach will help
the facilitator to plan future sessions, taking into account these problems and the distinctive features of each group.
The facilitator will explain the object of the presentations and distribute a prepared
form for each participant to fill in (see exercise sheet, page 34). Participants from the
same department, region or project could be asked to join together and prepare a single
presentation.
The group is given a maximum of 20 minutes to prepare the presentations. Each
presentation is allowed 3 minutes, plus 2 minutes for questions or clarifications. Long
discussions are not permitted at this stage since time will be given later during the course.
Each presentation should be written on large sheets, which will be put up on the wall
during the presentation. If possible, a secretary should type out the main points and
results of the presentations after the session is over, and distribute this information to all
the participants.
One problem frequently encountered in this exercise is the tendency to exceed the
time allocated. The facilitator must therefore be prepared to warn the participants when
their time is nearly over. This responsibility could be shared with one of the participants.
Different presentations often tend to be repetitive as regards the problems or experi-
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
33
ences that are described. One way of overcoming this is to organize the presentations by
subject, taking all the participants who work on similar projects (e.g. gravity systems, or
small piped systems with motorized water lifting, etc.) and grouping them together.
Questions will be allowed only after all the participants in the subject area have completed their presentations.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
34
3. Exercise sheet
Form for initial presentations
1. Personal data
Name:
Nationality:
Location of professional activity:
Profession and education:
Present function:
2. Programme / project
Name of programme / project:
Main components of the project (point by point and briefly):
3. Main O&M and management problems
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
35
Unit 3: Concepts and trends
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To specify the importance of O&M and management
■ To analyse O&M in a wider perspective of sustainability. To define the concepts of
operation, maintenance and management
■ To raise awareness on present trends
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Focused discussion on the importance of O&M
3. Interactive presentation of the factors and process dealing with sustainability
4. Group exercise on definition of concepts
5. Exercise on the attributes of good management
6. Focused discussion on what is rural
➽ Materials
✔ Transparencies on the forms for exercises
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
➽ Handouts
✔ Forms for exercises
✔ Copies of selected parts of background information
✔ Copies of all transparencies
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
The aim of this session is to clarify and define the key concepts around which the course
has been designed. It is important for all participants to understand that the issues relating to O&M are not only technical, but also social, managerial, institutional, financial
and environmental. Recent advances in water supply and sanitation projects reflect these
concepts, which are the result of trials and experiences during the past 20 years. The
session will also serve to introduce the group to a participatory teaching methodology,
which does not exclude presentations and lectures. It is recommended that the group
should be reminded, from time to time during the course, of these concepts which are
the cornerstone of the whole approach.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
36
Focused discussion on the importance of O&M
After reminding the participants that their decision to attend this course was because
they believed O&M was an important issue in their profession, the facilitator asks them,
“Why is O&M important?” The group’s answers to this question are written on the flip
chart or board by the facilitator or one of the participants. If an answer is not clear, the
facilitator helps this person and, in addition, may ask the participants to illustrate their
answers with an example from personal experience in order to improve comprehension.
The facilitator should ensure that the following ideas are mentioned and discussed by
the group: proper functioning, user’s satisfaction, sustainability, quality of life, health
standards, and credibility of investments. After the session, the results of the discussion
may be typed out and distributed. The facilitator should not forget to keep track of time.
Interactive presentation of the factors and process dealing with sustainability
In an interactive presentation the facilitator, from time to time during the presentation,
poses questions so that the group can interact, e.g. by explaining the situation in their
own words or by experiencing or proposing new ideas. The presentation starts by reminding the participants of the close links between operation and maintenance and
sustainability. The first message to be conveyed is that sustainability is a process which
starts right from the planning stage, and that O&M is not simply what happens after the
system has been constructed. The first overhead sheet, representing a graphic of
sustainability (see page 38), may now be presented. More details are provided below in
the section on background information. The second message deals with the factors that
influence sustainability. The facilitator can refer to the second overhead sheet and to the
content details under background information (see page 45). Another effective way to
help the participants’ comprehension is to explain the drawing with sustainability circles
(see page 39), step by step.
Group exercise on definition of concepts
The facilitator asks the group to define the following terms: 1) sustainability, 2) operation, and 3) maintenance. Key words suggested by the participants are then written on
the board, and from these a definition is gradually formulated for each term. At this
stage, full phrases may not be required for the definitions.
A set of overhead sheets provides definitions for this course (pages 41–43), which are
compared with what the participants proposed. Any difficulties in understanding should
be discussed until the whole group reaches a consensus.
Exercise on the attributes of good management
Management is one of the key terms in this course. It is therefore important to have a
common understanding about what it entails. There are no right or wrong answers, but
the objective is to highlight the participants’ perception of management and to compare
this with what the course will provide in terms of management tools.
The facilitator divides the participants into three or four groups and gives them an
envelope containing labels, each representing a major attribute generally connected with
management (see exercise sheet, page 44). Each group must choose five major attributes,
which they think are needed for the proper management of projects. Some 15 to 20
minutes are required for this exercise.
Each group puts up their labels on the board and explains briefly (in five minutes)
the reasons for their choice. The facilitator then presents the group with a definition of
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
37
management and highlights some issues on management, which will be worked upon in
the course. Time should be set aside for discussion and questions to promote clarification.
Focused discussion on what is rural
To end the session, the facilitator asks the group to reflect on this key term in the title of
the course, i.e. what do they understand by “rural”? The participants’ answers may cause
some difficulty because countries vary in their rural situations and characteristics. To
facilitate consensus it can be proposed that, in the present context, the focus must be on
low-cost technologies, including small piped-water supply systems. The aim here is not to
give a precise definition of what is rural, but to provide a framework for improving rural
water supply and sanitation, and to give an overview of the size and socioeconomic
conditions of human settlements in the rural areas. Water supply and sanitation technologies will be reviewed during the session on “O&M requirements” (see Module 2,
Unit 1, page 63).
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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3. Overhead and exercise sheets: Sheet 1
Level of benefits
Sustainability in the
project phases
1
2
3
B
A
Planning and design phase
Construction phase
O&M phase
Time
1 & 2: Development reaches sustainability
3: Unsustainable development
■ Careful planning and design of O&M must already be
completed during the planning and design phase
■ Sustainability starts at the planning phase
■ What are the factors that influence sustainability?
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
39
Overhead sheet 2
Factors which influence
sustainability 1
Institutional and legal framework
Support—Adequate legislation—Resource development
Technology
Complexity
Human resources
Service level
Cost of O&M
Spare parts
O&M
Environment
Quality
Quanity
Continuity
RISK
SUSTAINABILITY
BEHAVIOUR
AND
MANAGEMENT
OWNERSHIP
Community
Capacity to manage
Gender
Sociocultural factors
Willingness to pay
Financial management
Technical skills
1
From CINARA-IRC course material: Gestion para la sostenibilidad en programas de agua potable y saneamiento
(Management of sustainability in drinking-water and sanitation programmes), 1994–98.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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Overhead sheet 3
Processes which influence
sustainability
● Demand from the community
● Responsiveness from the supporting
institutions
● Participation of the community throughout the
project phases
● Linking technology choice with operation and
maintenance
● Integrated planning (sanitation, water, hygiene,
environment)
● Planning with a gender perspective
● Decentralization and transfer of
responsibilities and resources
● Capacity-building at all levels
● Communication among stakeholders
● Public-private partnership
● Co-responsibility between communities and
municipalities
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
41
Overhead sheet 4
Definitions
Sustainability
A service is sustainable when:
➽ it functions and is being used
➽ it is able to deliver an appropriate level of
benefits (quality, quantity, convenience,
comfort, continuity, affordability, efficiency,
equity, reliability, health)
➽ it continues over a prolonged period of time
(which goes beyond the life-cycle of the
equipment)
➽ its management is institutionalized (community
management, gender perspective, partnership
with local authorities, involvement of formal/
informal private sector)
➽ its operation, maintenance, administrative and
replacement costs are covered at local level
(through user fees, or alternative financial
mechanisms)
➽ it can be operated and maintained at local
level with limited but feasible external support
(technical assistance, training, monitoring)
➽ it does not affect the environment negatively.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
42
Overhead sheet 5
Definitions
Operation
Operation deals with the actual running of a
service (e.g. provision of fuel, starting or handling
of pumps, control of water collection points,
general mechanical or water treatment
procedures, hygienic handling, etc.).
Maintenance
Maintenance deals with the activities that keep
the system in proper working condition, including
management, cost recovery, repairs and
preventive maintenance.
➽ Crisis maintenance: maintenance undertaken only in response to breakdowns and/
or public complaints, leading to poor service
level, high O&M costs, faster wear and tear of
equipment, and user’s dissatisfaction.
➽ Preventive maintenance: maintenance
activities undertaken in response to prescheduled systematic inspection, repair and
replacement, leading to continuity in service
level, O&M costs spread over time, extension
of life-span of equipment, user’s satisfaction
and willingness to pay.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
43
Overhead sheet 6
Definitions
Management
Management deals with the control and
organization of a service and encompasses the
following main functions:
● Development of a vision and strategy
● Planning
● Organization and mobilization of resources
● Administration
● Accounting
● Leadership, motivation of personnel
● Supervision, monitoring and evaluation
● Promotion of external relationships.
This course focuses on the following managerial
issues:
● Strategy development
● Planning skills
● Skills in problem-solving
● Integration of technical and social issues
● Communication (efficient presentation
technique)
● Monitoring
● Human resource development
● Planning with communities.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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Exercise sheet
Management attributes 1
Prepare in advance an envelope containing the following labels which describe a
possible management attribute. Each group will have to choose the five most
important attributes for managing O&M (see notes on page 36).
1
Sense of responsibility
Skills in planning
Willingness to
take risks
Staff supervision
Skill in problem-solving
Sense of humour
Capability to generate
new ideas
Communication
Planning with
communities
Enthusiasm
Promotion of external
relations
Monitoring
Strategy development
Initiative
Integration:
technical/social
Technical skills
Mobilizing resources
Ability to work in groups
Human resource
development
Stimulating leadership
Adapted from: Srinivasan L. Exercise in tools for community participation—A manual for training trainers in participatory techniques (PROWWESS/UNDP Technical Series). PROWWESS/UNDP—World Bank Water and Sanitation
Program, New York, 1993.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
45
4. Background information
4.1 Operation and maintenance in the context of sustainability
Sustainability depends to a large extent on effective and efficient operation and maintenance. Many factors and processes that contribute to sustainability have a direct influence on operation and maintenance.
Sustainability can be analysed in time, as shown in the Figure on project phases (see
page 38). A service is sustainable when:
a) it is functioning and being used; b) it is able to deliver an appropriate level of
benefits (quality, quantity, convenience, comfort, continuity, affordability, efficiency, equity,
reliability, health); c) it continues over a prolonged period of time (which goes beyond the lifecycle of the equipment); d) its management is institutionalized (community management,
gender perspective, partnership with local authorities, involvement of formal/informal private
sector); f) its operation, maintenance, administrative and replacement costs are covered
at local level (through user fees, or alternative financial mechanisms); g) it can be operated
and maintained at local level with limited but feasible external support (technical assistance, training, monitoring); and h) it does not affect the environment negatively.
Proper operation and maintenance activities will contribute to the sustainability of a
service after its construction, depending on a series of factors and processes which will
have to be developed during the design and planning phase, and consolidated during
the construction phase. In other words, the sustainability of operation and maintenance
starts right from the planning stage.
4.2 Factors which contribute to sustainability and to effective operation and maintenance
As described in the chart with circles (see page 39), sustainability relies on four interrelated factors (adapted from CINARA—IRC course material, 1994 to 1998): a) technical
factors, b) community factors, c) environmental factors, and d) the legal and institutional framework.
The technical factors which are likely to influence operation and maintenance as well
as sustainability as a whole are: technology selection; complexity of technology; its capacity to respond to a demand and a desired service level; its impact on the environment;
the technical skills needed to operate and maintain a system; the availability, accessibility
and costs of spare parts; and the cost of maintenance.
The community factors which are likely to influence operation and maintenance as
well as sustainability as a whole are: availability of technical skills to operate and maintain
a service, and implement preventive maintenance activities and small and big repairs;
capacity and willingness to pay; participation of all social groups in the community and
both men and women; financial and administrative management carried out by a legitimate and organized community structure; the felt need for an improved service; sociocultural aspects related to water; and individual, domestic and collective behaviour
regarding hygiene and sanitation.
The intersection between the technical circle and the community circle (see chart on
page 39) indicates the level of ownership and responsibility of communities towards the
service. Ownership and responsibility are the key prerequisites for sustainable operation
and maintenance.
The environmental factors which are likely to influence operation and maintenance
as well as sustainability as a whole are: the quality of the water source (which will in turn
influence the technology choice, and its need for treatment); and its quantity and continuity.
The intersection between the environmental circle and the community circle (see
page 39) represents the way the community will manage water resources and especially
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
46
the impact on the environment of community behaviour in terms of sanitation and
management of used waters. Water resources management, pollution control, hygienic
behaviour, and proper wastewater management are all crucial components for sustaining a water supply service, to which operation and maintenance must contribute.
All these factors evolve within a legal and institutional framework. At the national
level there must be clear policies and strategies towards operation and maintenance,
which can be implemented. Support activities, such as technical assistance, training,
monitoring, water quality control, and the setting up of alternative financing mechanisms are all likely to influence operation and maintenance activities.
Financial factors are key components inherent in all the above factors (technical,
community, environment and institutional).
4.3 Processes which influence sustainable operation and maintenance
Processes differ from factors since they focus on the approach and the methodology of
working. In the past, it was thought that the development or consolidation of factors
alone could contribute to greater efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability. Now, however, it is realized that processes also have an important role to play. Among the processes
can be listed the following: demand from the communities; responsiveness from supporting institutions and agencies; participation of communities (men and women)
through the whole project cycle; linking technology choice with operation and maintenance; integration of water, sanitation, health and environment; planning with a gender
perspective; effective decentralization; communication among all stakeholders; public/
private partnership; co-responsibility between community and municipality; and
capacity-building at all levels.
Demand for an improved service by the communities is a prerequisite for sustainability.
It is an expression of their commitment, and a way to make communities responsible for
their choices and future tasks. However, demand should be promoted because communities must be made aware of the different technology options available, and of their
financial consequences. The concrete expression of demand varies from one country to
another and from one development agency to another. Demand can be manifested in
the form of an initial contribution in cash or in kind to the capital costs, or in the form of
a written solicitation from an organized community group to the municipality.
Responsiveness of support institutions and agencies is the capacity of municipalities,
nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and other institutions and agencies to respond
adequately to the needs and demand of communities. In many countries, municipalities
need to be consolidated in their ability to deal with rural communities.
Participation of communities (men and women) throughout the whole project cycle
is essential since it is a way to motivate, make responsible and build the capacities of
communities in their new tasks and functions.
Linking technology choice with operation and maintenance at the planning stage is
the key in the technology selection process. Indeed, communities must be able and willing to operate, maintain, administrate and finance the new service.
Planning with a gender perspective implies that the roles and functions of both men
and women are clearly defined for management, operation and maintenance, since these
might also highlight the need for specific capacity-building activities.
The decentralization process, which is underway in most developing countries, has a
definite impact on the way institutions deal with the provision of water supply services.
The main trend is for municipalities to be responsible, while the private sector (formal
and informal) can contribute actively in the maintenance of systems.
Communication from central to local level and vice versa, and between private
agencies and development agencies can enhance the coordination of activities and
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
47
implementation of policies. Furthermore, a proper information and monitoring system
relies on effective communication channels.
Public / private partnership can have an important role in the operation and maintenance of improved water supply and sanitation services, where the private sector can
operate, maintain, and manage the service under contractual agreements.
Co-responsibility between communities and municipalities implies that the tasks,
responsibilities and functions of both parties are clearly defined. This is especially true
now that municipalities are increasingly being given the legal and constitutional
responsibility for the provision of public services. At the same time, community management is being promoted as a key element of sustainability. Efficient dialogue and a clear
definition of roles need to be worked out, developed and consolidated.
Capacity-building at all levels is needed, especially in an environment of changing
roles and responsibilities induced by the decentralization process.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
48
Unit 4: Linking water, health, sanitation and
environmental protection
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To raise awareness on the need to link water, health, sanitation and environmental
protection
■ To show that adequate operation and maintenance of water supply and sanitation will
contribute to health and environmental protection
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Video presentation followed by a discussion
3. Interactive presentation on the links between major health preventive measures and
environmental protection
4. Focused discussion on behavioural change
5. Exercise in plenary using a behavioural change matrix
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Video projector
✔ Video: “Prescription for Health”
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of all transparencies
✔ Selected extracts from background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
It was mentioned in a previous session that there is a trend to link water supply, health,
sanitation and environmental protection activities because an adequate water supply by
itself cannot solve all health problems. Proper handling and hygienic use of water, hygienic maintenance of water points and water sources, protection of the environment, safe
sanitation disposal and cleaning of hands all contribute to the improvement of health.
The facilitator must therefore focus on the importance of linking water supply, health,
sanitation and environmental protection, and help all participants to see the need for
such integration.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
49
Video presentation followed by a discussion
A 23-minute video film, “Prescription for Health”, was produced by the IDRC (International Development Research Centre), P.O. Box 8500, Ottawa K1G 3H9, Canada, and is
suitable for audiences of diverse cultural backgrounds. It was filmed in Bangladesh, Kenya,
Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand, with extensive animation sequences to illustrate
clearly the contamination path. The video promotes personal hygiene and community
practices linked to water supply and sanitation, which can help to break the cycle of
infection. Produced in collaboration with the World Health Organization and OXFAM,
the video is primarily aimed at health care workers and water and sanitation engineers. It
is a source of information for planners and policy-makers, and particularly strong in
raising awareness.
After viewing the video, the participants are asked by the facilitator to comment on
the key messages brought up in the film. Their main ideas are written on the board,
together with statements from the video which are added by the facilitator who must be
thoroughly familiar with the film. The facilitator then asks the participants how far this
type of approach has been or could be utilized in their own working environment, and
encourages them to discuss freely based on their personal experiences.
Identification of obstacles that inhibit the link between water supply, health, sanitation and environmental protection is discussed in a plenary session. The aim of this
exercise is to show the constraints that must be overcome in order to reach integration.
Such issues as no priority, not our mandate, no knowledge about it, poor financial
resources, and poor inter-sectoral cooperation might come out during the discussion.
The course does not try to solve these problems, but tries to show how O&M activities
can contribute to this integration.
Interactive presentation on major preventive measures and environmental protection
Using the overhead sheets provided, the facilitator shows the major preventive measures
for reducing the transmission of diseases related to water and sanitation. Some explanations are available in the background information and supporting material.
The topic of environmental protection is dealt with in the same way. In both cases, it
is important to show how these issues are related to O&M and its management. After an
overhead sheet is presented, the group is asked, “How can a better O&M contribute to
this situation?”
Focused discussion on behavioural change
Since hygiene practices and environmental protection activities are linked to specific
individual, domestic or collective behaviours, the facilitator initiates a discussion with
the group by asking the following questions: “Can you give examples from your professional experience of activities that aimed at changing behaviour, or specific outcomes
which depended on behaviour change?” “Were they successful?” “What made them
successful or not successful?” The facilitator then discusses with the group some basic
aspects which make behavioural change not always successful (see background information, page 55).
Exercise in plenary using a behavioural change matrix
Key criteria for activities to promote behavioural change have been developed in a
matrix by UNICEF, which can be presented to the whole group as an exercise in a
plenary session. The matrix is given in an exercise sheet (see page 54).
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
50
The facilitator asks the group for examples of behavioural change which all participants are familiar with, such as “Use of chlorine tablets to disinfect water at household
level”. The facilitator goes through the whole matrix with the participants, analysing the
chosen behaviour change, and scores the total number of points. The final result is evaluated according to the ranges given in the exercise.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
51
3. Overhead and exercise sheets: Sheet 1
Prevention of diseases related
to water and sanitation
Major preventive measures
1. Safe human excreta disposal*
2. Personal hygiene
3. Domestic hygiene
4. Food hygiene
5. Water hygiene*
6. Safe wastewater disposal and drainage*
* Link with Operation and Maintenance.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
52
Overhead sheet 2
Relationship between infection
and preventive measures 1
Infection
Safe human Personal
excreta
hygiene*
disposal*
Domestic
hygiene
Food
hygiene
Water
hygiene*
Drainage*
Diarrhoea
Dysentry
Typhoid
Cholera
Roundworm
(ascariasis)
Whipworm
(trichuriasis)
Hookworm
Beef and pork
tapeworms
Schistosomiasis
(bilharzia)
Guinea worm
(dracunculiasis)
Scabies
Ringworm
Yaws
Trachoma
Conjunctivitis
Louse-borne
typhus
Louse-borne
relapsing fever
Malaria
Yellow fever
Dengue
Bancroftian
filariasis
* Can be influenced by adequate operation and maintenance.
1
From: Boot M, Cairncross S. Action speaks: the study of hygiene behaviour in water and sanitation projects. The Hague,
IRC (and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), 1993.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
53
Overhead sheet 3
Drinking water source
protection 1
● Appropriate source selection and intake
● Catchment protection*
● Sanitary surveying of water point*
● Improvement of sanitation practices*
● Physical protection of wells and intakes*
● Soil and water conservation techniques*
● Wastewater treatment*
● Wastewater recycling*
● Artificial recharge
● Reforestation
● Community motivation and awareness*
● Partnership between communities and
authorities
● Legislation and enforcement
* Can be influenced by adequate operation and maintenance practices.
1
From: Bastemeyer TF, Lee MD. Drinking water source protection. The Hague, IRC, 1991.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
54
Exercise sheet
Behavioural change matrix
Criteria for evaluating the likelihood of
behavioural change
(Source: van Wijk C, Murre T, Esrey S. Motivating for better hygiene and behaviour. New York,
UNICEF—IRC, 1996)
Health impact of
behavioural change
0. No impact on health
1. Minor impact
2. Some impact
3. Significant impact
4. Very significant impact
5. Eliminates the problem
Complexity of
behavioural change
0. Unrealistic
1. Involves too many actions
2. Involves many actions
3. Involves few actions
4. Involves two actions
5. Involves one action
Direct consequences
of behavioural change
0. No consequences
1. Minor consequences
2. Some consequences
3. Significant consequences
4. Major consequences
5. Consequences guaranteed
Frequency of
behaviour
0. Too cumbersome
1. Must be done hourly
2. Must be done once a day
3. May be done every
few days
4. May be done once a
week
5. May be done occasionally
Cost and effort of engaging
behavioural change
0. Unrealistic
1. Requires important
resources and effort
2. Requires significant
resources and effort
3. Requires some
resources and effort
4. Few resources or effort
5. Requires only existing
resources
Persistence needed to
induce behavioural change
0. Unrealistic
1. Requires compliance
for several weeks
2. Compliance for a week
3. Compliance for several
days
4. Compliance for a day
5. Very brief compliance
Compatibility with
existing activities
0. Totally incompatible
1. Significantly incompatible
2. Some incompatibility
3. Little incompatibility
4. Easy to incorporate in
existing activities
5. Type of activity already
widely practised
Observability
Similar practices
0. Cannot be observed by
an outsider
1. Very difficult to observe
2. Difficult to observe
3. Is observable with
attention
4. Observable
5. Cannot be missed
0.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Nothing like this is done
Slightly similar
Existing practice similar
Several similar practices
Many similar practices
Similar practices widely
existing
For each proposed behavioural change, score 0 to 5 for each of the nine boxes. Aggregate the
total score for each behavioural change. If the score is less than 20, it is highly unlikely that the
audience will make the change. Different goals must be set. If the score is over 36, it is highly
likely that the goal will be achieved.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
55
4. Background information
4.1 Why is behaviour not changed by conventional hygiene education? 1
Planners of hygiene programmes and practitioners often believe that it is possible to give
universal hygiene messages to the population. Such messages are based on the assumption that the knowledge of health educators is superior to local insights and practices.
The fact that people have adapted their lifestyle to local circumstances and developed
their insights and knowledge over years of trial and error is overlooked. General hygiene
messages can therefore be irrelevant, incomplete or unrealistic.
The methods used to get the information across are often not suitable to create behavioural change. Many health messages are given in the form of lectures at health clinics, talks in meetings and gatherings, and through the mass media (e.g. posters, radio
talks, brochures and booklets). Even if the educators succeed in reaching the intended
audiences using the media, the people are only “told what to do”, and often do not get
the chance to relate the message to their own experiences. It is important to realize that
people can make sense of new information only in the light of their own experiences,
perceptions and cultural backgrounds.
Many health education programmes teach people about water and sanitation-related
diseases—what they are, how they are caused, and how they are prevented. But education does not, by itself, reduce the risks of transmitting these diseases. Only action can do
this; knowledge is useful but not sufficient. Reviews of hygiene programmes show that
appropriate settings to promote particular changes are rare.
4.2 What motivates people to improve their hygiene?
If general messages and information on disease transmission do not change people’s
behaviour, what is it that can bring people to take action on the risky practices and conditions in their own environment?
An individual will adopt new behaviour when he or she believes that the practice has
clear benefits—for health or other reasons—and considers these benefits as important.
Change of behaviour is also considerably influenced by convenience, comfort, and
status. The individual will then develop a positive attitude to the change. Positive or
negative views on the environment from others can also influence a person’s decision to
try the new practice. Thus, an individual’s attitude and situation will determine if the
practice is taken up, and when this is found to be beneficial, it is continued.
What hygiene education programmes can do is to support water and sanitation projects,
which are planning to install new facilities for the community’s use:
a) by assessing if water, sanitation and hygiene have a high priority among the various
groups in the community, and by promoting their understanding of the implications of
the existing conditions and proposed technical options for both community and family
health;
b) by following up people’s use of the newly installed facilities and their hygiene
practices in order to provide feedback to planners who will be better prepared to reduce
other disease transmission risks, which prevent the realization of health improvements
in the communities concerned.
Certain practices cannot produce results by individual change alone, but require concerted action by larger groups and the whole community. Making choices together, assigning responsibilities, and monitoring action will increase the people’s commitment to
put into practice the agreed changes. Communal change is only possible when the com-
1
From: van Wijk C, Murre T, Esrey S. Motivating better hygiene behaviour: importance for public health—Mechanisms of change. New York,
UNICEF—IRC, 1996.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
56
munity members themselves feel there is a problem and jointly undertake action that
will permanently improve the conditions and their practices.
When learning, people remember 20% of what they hear, 40% of what they hear and
see, and 80% of what they discover for themselves. This calls for a change in the way
teaching is carried out—from a didactic to a more participatory and growth-centred
education.
Four major factors stimulate people to change their behaviour: 1) facilitation
(convenience, making life easier); 2) practical understanding; 3) influence of others;
4) capacity to change.
4.3 Experiences in better water resource management 1
Source selection and siting of intakes
Field experience shows that good source selection and adequate siting of intakes contribute to the reliability of the water supply system. For the selection of groundwater
sources, in particular for small point source supplies, procedures could be more systematic, both in terms of locating high-yielding sites and in terms of avoiding sites with a
high potential for contamination by seepage from the surface.
For the siting of shallow drilled and hand-dug wells, the risk associated with faecal
contamination from on-site sanitation are poorly understood and quantified. Where water
supply points are located within or adjacent to settlements, two elements have not been
adequately addressed with respect to possible contamination by existing sanitation units
and/or waste disposal practices. The first element concerns the risk of contamination of
drinking-water sources from waste. The second is the lack of criteria for the establishment of safe distances between water source and possible contamination points.
With increasing population pressures and expansion of human activities into previously undisturbed catchment areas, risk assessment must take into account both current
and projected activities within the catchment area.
Catchment protection
More active protection of catchment areas is needed, which involves a systematic
appraisal of catchment areas for surface or groundwater sources and the identification
of environmental factors related to land use. There is a need for practical experience to
develop checklists for small sources to be effectively managed and maintained by local
communities.
The groundwater pollution risk is the product of the contaminant load applied to the
subsurface by human actions and the natural pollution vulnerability of the aquifer. To
protect aquifers, it must be clear which pollutants and pollution sources affect them
most. This knowledge forms the basis for delimiting protection zones within which
human activities must be regulated.
Protection zones are important for the design, prioritization and distribution of
water resources protection measures. The zones can be delimited with respect to the
level and nature of the risk, resulting in more coherent and incisive protection strategies. The effectiveness of protection zones depends on the commitment of the local
population to observe established protection measures. Protected areas are obviously
increasingly vulnerable as population density increases.
1
Extracts from: Bastemeyer T. Drinking-water source protection. The Hague, IRC, 1991.
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
57
Sanitary surveying
Sanitary surveys are a form of risk assessment in which the bacteriological, physical and
chemical quality of a water source, the technical quality of the water supply point, the
way it will be used by the communities, the surrounding environmental hygiene conditions, and the potential causes for contamination are examined. Their purpose is to
minimize the level of risks of on-site contamination by identifying remedial measures
which can quickly and easily be undertaken.
Improvement in sanitation
The problem of contamination of the water supply by users through poor sanitation and
hygiene is widespread. Use of latrines and other sanitary systems reduces the risk of
faecal pollution by excluding contamination of the topsoil or ground surface so that
excreta are not washed into the surface water or transported by animals. The design of
latrines should in principle ensure that there is no direct sub-surface link between the
excreta and the groundwater supply, which involves taking into consideration the site,
soil type and depth, and seasonal and daily water levels.
Physical protection of wells and intakes
Users pollute their water sources due to the lack of awareness about ways and means to
ensure adequate physical protection of the water supply point. Community water supply
projects, which are engaged in groundwater development through construction of wells,
recognize the importance of simple site protection against pollution. The addition of
well-aprons, soakway drains, covers and handpumps protect the water’s quality by preventing the inflow of contaminated water back into the well.
Soil and water conservation techniques
Soil and water conservation activities can decrease turbidity by preventing sediment transport, increasing groundwater recharge, and decreasing surface flow peaks by increasing
infiltration. A full range of erosion control techniques and strategies has been pioneered
for developing countries and applied with considerable success.
However, soil erosion has expanded at a faster pace than most national governments
have been able to cope with. A large proportion of soil erosion problems resulted from
the expansion of shifting cultivation techniques into marginal areas. Additionally, they
result from the settling of previously semi-nomadic people who have little history of
terrace building or other traditional forms of soil stabilization.
Wastewater treatment
Both industrial effluent and domestic sewage should be treated to minimize pollution
risks. For domestic sewage, different on-site and off-site technical options are available,
but they are not always applied. In the developing countries, sewage lagoons and oxidation ditches are among the most economical methods. There is little experience in the
use of simple and effective, low-cost treatment technologies for small-scale industrial
polluters, especially for small rural agro-industries. There are no feasible treatment
possibilities to deal with the many toxic elements originating from industries and the
misapplication of fertilizers. Preventive measures against contamination from industrial
and agricultural activities are therefore crucial.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
58
Wastewater recycling
Wastewater treatment is complementary to wastewater recycling. As such, sewage waste
may only need partial treatment in order to be used on farmland for irrigation or in a
range of industrial processes where water quality standards are not critical. Wastewater
recycling, if carried out correctly, can be a form of water source protection as well as
conservation. The risk of contamination of water sources is decreased through proper
recycling and increases the efficient use of the water source. In this way, water is treated
by less expensive methods, since treatment requires mainly the removal of coliforms and
helminths (e.g. wastewater treatment ponds).
Artificial recharge
Ground-water resources can be managed in order to decrease water table recession and
saltwater intrusion, by artificial recharge. On the small and medium scale, recharge is
predominantly performed from infiltration ditches, ponds and basins, retention of river
underflow (using sub-surface dams), and through the retention of river floodwater. Sand
storage dams can also be used to increase the dimensions of the shallow ground-water
reservoir.
Reforestation
Reforestation programmes coupled with anti-erosion, soil and water conservation techniques are considered essential for the improvement of many water source problems.
However, at the present time many more trees are cut down than planted.
Community motivation and awareness
Many water pollution problems are due to a lack of awareness of the causes of health
problems among communities. The link between water, hygiene and illness is not strongly
perceived since water is assumed to be beneficial and cleansing rather than a potential
source of infection.
Partnership between communities and government agencies
A reliable and functioning water supply system may greatly contribute to the protection
of water sources, and vice versa. Community-based maintenance and management of
water supply systems is a good starting point for a more integrated approach to water
source protection and environmental conservation. Although community water
management strategies are possible, there must generally be direct links between the
community and the water source. Communities must be the users of the water source or
derive some other benefit from the protective action such as commercial benefits from
tree planting or increased crop production following soil conservation. Conflict of interest between upstream and downstream users is a serious problem worldwide. That is why
a sound legal basis for community water supply systems is very important. Government
institutions and local authorities should support community efforts to manage and
protect their drinking-water sources.
Legislation and enforcement
At the present time, water resource and environmental legislation in most developing
countries has evolved over the years in response to specific water management problems,
which were associated with economic and demographic growth. The legislation has usually been directed towards controlling the use of water from major rivers or lakes, which
MODULE 1. INTRODUCTION
59
are of economic significance, and currently does not provide a good basis for the protection of drinking-water sources.
WHO has listed the following legal issues which require attention:
— regulations are needed to ensure that the source exploited for community water
supply is the most favourable in terms of quality, quantity, and access;
— regulations are needed to ensure health and environmental protection for
wastewater use since there are obvious public health hazards;
— legal provisions are required to ensure that potential water sources are adequately
protected from the harmful effects of wastewater infiltration;
— legislation and regulations are needed to ensure that the costs of community
water supply and sanitation are recovered from all water source users.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
61
MODULE 2
Situation analysis
Unit 1: Operation and maintenance requirements
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead and exercise sheets
4. Background information
4.1 What is sanitation?
4.2 Water supply and sanitation O&M fact sheets
Rooftop water harvesting—Spring water captation—
Drilled well—Rope and bucket: loose, through a pulley or
on a windlass—Direct-action handpump—Deep-well piston
handpump—Diesel engine—Chlorination in piped water
supply systems—Slow sand filtration—Public standpost—
Ventilated improved pit latrine—Double-vault compost
latrine—Septic tank and aqua-privy—Drainage field—
Small-bore or settled sewerage
4.3 Spare parts provision in general
4.4 Towards sustainable spare parts provision
63
63
63
65
70
70
70
103
103
Unit 2: Analysis of participation
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheets
4. Background information
107
107
107
109
109
Unit 3: Analysis of constraints
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheets
4. Background information
4.1 The importance of problem analysis
4.2 What is a problem?
4.3 The OOPP methodology
4.4 How to analyse problems
110
110
110
112
116
116
116
117
117
Unit 4: Analysis of objectives
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheets
4. Background information
4.1 Discussion on alternatives: identifying potential alternative
solutions
119
119
119
121
123
123
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
63
Unit 1: Operation and maintenance requirements
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To identify the rural water supply and sanitation technologies which are most
frequently used in the participants’ projects
■ To identify the operation and maintenance requirements of both water supply and
sanitation technologies
■ To review problems in spare parts availability.
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Focused discussion on rural water supply and sanitation technologies most frequently
used in the participants’ projects
3. Group assessment of operation and maintenance requirements and problems most
frequently encountered
4. Presentation on spare parts availability.
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of all transparencies
✔ Selected extracts from background information
✔ Forms for the exercise
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
Situation analysis starts by reviewing the main technical activities for the operation and
maintenance of rural water supply and sanitation services. It allows the participants to
understand and be familiar with the various technologies presented in the course.
Focused discussion on rural water supply and sanitation technologies
The facilitator asks the participants what types of technologies are being promoted in
their rural water supply and sanitation projects. These are listed on the board and, with
the aid of the transparencies (see overhead sheets, pages 65–67), compared with the
technologies presented in the course.
The course deals with only human excreta disposal systems, which is the basic sanitation option in many projects. This does not mean that other aspects of sanitation, such as
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
64
wastewater disposal, solid waste disposal, and drainage of surface (rain) water, are not
important because they are all important.
All water supply and sanitation project planners should, as if automatically, be able to
integrate their basic and simple wastewater disposal services with water supply services.
However, the course does not advocate systems which cannot be sustained by rural communities.
Group assessment of basic O&M requirements
The aim of this exercise is to assess the basic O&M activities in a particular system which
will be chosen by the groups, including their frequency, human resources and skills, and
requirements for tools, equipment, materials and spare parts. The participants are
divided into groups corresponding to the main technologies, including sanitation. All
participants are asked to fill in a form (see exercise sheet on “Assessment of basic O&M
requirements”, page 68). Each group then rapidly presents their work, with an emphasis
on the problems encountered which will be considered throughout the course. The
present session deals with the problem of spare parts availability.
Interactive presentation on spare parts availability
Problems in the availability of spare parts are often encountered in the operation and
maintenance of water supply and sanitation projects. This session reviews the main characteristics of the problem, which must be taken into account in planning for spare parts.
The overhead sheets and background information (see below) will be useful in preparing the presentations, in which the participants will describe their experiences. In addition, a spare parts supplier could be invited to share his experience and perceptions
during the session.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
65
3. Overhead and exercise sheets: Sheet 1
Water sources for low-cost water
supply technologies
Rain water
Rooftop water harvesting
Catchment and storage dams
Groundwater
Spring water captation
Dug well
Drilled well
Subsurface harvesting
Surface water
Protected side intake
Bottom river intake
Floating intake
Sump intake
Water-lifting technologies
Rope and bucket: loose, through a pulley, or on a windlass
Bucket pump
Rope pump
Suction plunger handpump
Direct action pump
Deep-well piston pump
Deep-well diaphragm pump
Centrifugal pump
Electrical submersible pump
Axial flow pump
Hydraulic ram
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
66
Overhead sheet 2
Power systems
Human power
Animal traction
Windmill
Photovoltaic systems
Electric engines
Diesel engines
Water treatment devices
At the household level
Heating
Solar disinfection
Household slow sand filter
Domestic chlorination
At the community level
Pot chlorination in well
Storage and sedimentation
Upflow roughing filters
Slow sand filtration
Chlorination in piped water supply systems
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
67
Overhead sheet 3
Low-cost sanitation technologies
Dry systems
● Basic improved traditional latrine
● Ventilated improved pit latrine
● Double-vault compost latrine
Wet systems
● Pour-flush latrine with leaching pits
● Aqua-privy
● Pour- or full-flush latrine with septic tank
Pit-emptying techniques
● Vacuum tanker
● Vacutug
● Manual latrine pit-emptying technology
Liquid effluent disposal systems
● Soakaway
● Drainage field
● Small-bore sewerage
Frequency
Major O&M activities
Main problems:
Skills and human resources needed:
Tools, materials and spare parts needed:
Conclusion
Power system:
Type:
Technology choice (Fill in when applicable)
Tools, materials, spare parts
Distribution system:
Skills and human resources
Water treatment:
Assessment of basic Operation and Maintenance requirements
Exercise sheet
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
68
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
69
Overhead sheet 4
Sustainable provision of
spare parts depends on:
1. The demand for spare parts
● Spare parts needs
● Spare parts costs
● Spare parts accessibility
2. The supply of spare parts
● Use of local materials and manufacture
● Marketing and sales points
● Perspective on profits
3. Strategic issues
● Efficient planning
● Quality of spare parts
● Whether to standardize
● Approaches to reduction of spare parts needs
● Appropriate pricing policy
● Private sector involvement
● Capacity-building
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
70
4. Background information
4.1 What is sanitation?
Sanitation encompasses the following: 1) human excreta disposal systems, 2) wastewater
disposal devices, 3) solid waste disposal, and 4) drainage of surface (rain) water. This
course focuses mainly on human excreta disposal, which is considered to be the basic
sanitation option. The other three areas are also important and some comments on them
are given below.
Wastewater is either sullage (greywater), which is wastewater from kitchens and bathrooms, or sewage (blackwater), which includes sullage and is settled wastewater containing parts of human excreta, and water-borne waste. Problems are mainly encountered in
areas with a high density of houses and people, where the wastewater is liable to flooding
if there is no proper drainage, or can be a source of smells, rodents and contamination
(see Module 1, Unit 4, page 48). Wastewater can contaminate drinking-water supplies
through broken pipes or the spread of stagnant water, depending on the absorption
capacity of the soil. The problem with water-borne disposal is its high rate of water consumption, regular blockage in the drainage system, and high O&M costs.
Plans for simple wastewater disposal and drainage devices should be made during the
initial technical design phase. Proper maintenance of small gutters, drainage devices, or
areas surrounding water points is essential, and communities should actively participate
to prevent blockages and stagnant water forming around the water points.
Solid waste generally includes household refuse, waste from institutions, industrial
waste and hospital waste. Rural areas are mainly concerned with the first two of these, but
can be contaminated indirectly by pollution from industrial waste. Populations in developing countries produce different wastes from those in industrialized countries; there is
a similar difference in wastes between urban and rural areas. Vegetable waste accounts
for, on average, 30% of the total waste in industrialized countries and 75% in developing
countries; the possibilities for composting and recycling depend on the composition.
Improper solid waste disposal can present a public health risk, and is often the cause of
drainage blocks and aesthetic problems. Unplanned and uncontrolled dumpsites can
generate ground and groundwater pollution, as well as lead to air pollution and proliferation of rodents.
Maintenance activities linked to wastewater and solid waste disposal in rural areas are
to a large extent a matter of preventive maintenance by the active involvement of users.
Behavioural changes in communities to improve the operation and maintenance of
basic sanitation systems can be induced by effective awareness campaigns, together with
participatory sanitary problem assessment (see Module 1, Unit 4, page 48).
4.2 Water supply and sanitation O&M fact sheets
The fact sheets given below are extracted from: Linking technology choice with operation and
maintenance, in the context of low-income water supply and sanitation, by F. Brikké et al.
Published by the Operation and Maintenance Network of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council, 1997, and available from WHO headquarters (contact
Mr J. Hueb) or from IRC.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
71
O&M FACT SHEET
Rooftop water harvesting
a. Brief description of technology
Rooftop catchment systems gather rainwater caught on the roof of a house, school, etc. using gutters and downpipes
(made of local wood, bamboo, galvanized iron or PVC) and lead it to one or more storage containers ranging from simple
pots to large ferrocement tanks. If properly designed, a foul flush device or detachable downpipe is fitted for exclusion
of the first 20 litres of runoff during a rainstorm, which is mostly contaminated with dust, leaves, insects and bird
droppings. Sometimes runoff water is led through a small filter consisting of gravel, sand and charcoal before entering
the storage tank. Water may be abstracted from the tank by a tap, handpump or a bucket and rope system.
Initial cost: In Southern Africa, US$ 320 for a system with 11 m galvanized iron gutter, 1.3 m3 galvanized iron tank,
downpiping, tap and filters, excluding transport (Erskine, 1991). Where the roof is not suitable for water harvesting, the cost of improving the roof and gutters will have to be added to the cost of the tank. Such costs were
found to vary between about US$ 4 (in Kenya, subsidized) and US$ 12 (in Togo) per m2 (Lee & Visscher, 1992).
Total capital costs for rooftop rainwater catchment systems are usually higher than for other water supply
systems.
Yield: Potentially almost 1 litre per horizontal square metre per mm rainfall. The quantities usually are only sufficient for
drinking purposes.
Area of use: Most developing countries with one or two rainy seasons (especially in arid and semi-arid zones, with
average annual rainfall ranging from 250 to 750 mm) and where other improved water supply systems are
difficult to realize.
Construction: Systems are usually produced locally.
b. Description of O&M activities
In case there is no foul flush device, the user or caretaker has to divert away the first 20 litres or so of every rainstorm.
Fully automatic foul flush devices are often not very reliable. Water is taken from the storage tank by tapping, pumping,
or using a bucket and rope. For reasons of hygiene, the first two methods are preferred. Just before the start of the rainy
season, the complete system has to be checked for holes and broken parts and repaired if necessary. Taps or handpumps
have to be serviced. During the rainy season the system is checked regularly, and cleaned when dirty and after every dry
period of more than a month. Filters should be cleaned every few months, filter sand should be washed at least every six
months, and the outside of metal tanks may be painted about once a year. Leaks have to be repaired throughout the
year, especially leaking tanks and taps, as they present health risks. Chlorination of the water may be necessary. All
operation and maintenance activities can normally be executed by the users of the system. Major repairs, such as a
broken roof or tank, can usually be executed by a local craftsman using locally available tools and materials. Maintenance is simple but should be given ample attention.
Organizational aspects
The organization of O&M of communally shared roof or ground tank supplies is considerably more difficult than for
privately owned systems. Rooftop harvesting systems at schools, for instance, may suffer water losses from a tap left
dripping, and padlocks are often needed to ensure careful control over the supply. Ideally, one person should be responsible for overseeing the regular cleaning and occasional repair of the system, control of water use, etc. Selling the water
is an option to ensure income for O&M and to restrict water use. Where several households have installed a communal
system, e.g. where several roofs are connected to one tank, the users may want to establish a water committee to
manage O&M activities, which may include collection of fees, control of the caretaker’s work, and control of water use by
each family. External agents can play an important role in monitoring the condition of the system and the water quality,
in providing access to credit facilities to buy or replace a system, in training of users/caretakers for management and
execution of O&M, and training of local craftsmen for larger repairs.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
72
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Clean the system
1–3 times
per year
Local
Chlorine
Broom, brush,
bucket
Divert foul flush
Every storm
Local
Clean the filters
Twice a year
Local
Sand, charcoal, plastic mesh
Disinfect the
reservoir
Occasionally
Local
Chlorine
Bucket
Repair roof,
gutters and piping
Occasionally
Local
Tiles, metal sheet, asbestos
cement sheet etc., bamboo or
PVC pipes, nails, wire
Hammer, saw,
pliers, tin cutter
Repair tap or
pump
Occasionally
Local or area
Washers, cupseals etc.
Spanner,
screwdriver
Paint outside of
metal reservoir
Annually
Local
Anticorrosive paint
Steelbrush,
paintbrush
Repair ferrocement reservoir
Occasionally
Local
Cement, sand, gravel, metal
mesh, wire
Trowel, bucket,
pliers
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Close taps after taking water, keep the system clean
No special skills
Caretaker
Check functioning, divert first flush, clean the filters
and rest of the system, perform small repairs
Basic skills
Water committee
Supervise caretaker, collect fees
Organizational skills
Local craftsman
Repair roof, piping and tank
Basic plumbing and
masonry
External support
Check water quality, stimulate and guide local
organization, train the users
Microbial analysis,
extension work
e. Recurrent costs
Recurrent costs for materials and spare parts are very low. In most cases these costs are even considered negligible.
However, the recurrent costs for personnel—in cash or kind (for caretakers, committee members and craftsmen)—will
need to be added.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Corrosion of metal roofs, gutters, etc. Failure of functioning of the foul flush devices due to
neglect of maintenance. Leaking taps at the reservoir and problems with handpumps. Contamination of uncovered tanks,
especially where water is abstracted with a rope and bucket. Tanks may provide a breeding place for mosquitos, which
may increase the risk of diseases like malaria.
Limitations. The water may be insufficient to fulfil the drinking-water needs at certain times in the year, making it
necessary to develop other sources or go back to traditional sources during these periods. The investment needed for
the construction of a tank and suitable roofing is often beyond the financial capacity of households or communities.
Remarks. Tiled or metal roofs give the cleanest water. Thatched roofs yield less water which is more contaminated. The
acceptance of rooftop water harvesting as a suitable system may depend on the users’ views on the water’s taste.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
73
O&M FACT SHEET
Spring water captation
a. Brief description of technology
Spring water captation systems abduct and protect groundwater flows at the points where these arrive at the surface to
facilitate their abstraction. Spring water is usually fed from a sand or gravel water-bearing ground formation (aquifer), or
a water flow through fissured rock. Where solid or clay layers block the underground flow of water, it is forced upward
and can come to the surface. The water may emerge either in the open as a spring, or invisibly as an outflow into a river,
stream, lake or the sea. The main parts of a spring water captation are a drain under the lowest natural water level, a
protective structure providing stability and a seal to prevent surface water from leaking in. The drain is usually placed in
a gravel pack covered with sand and may lead to a conduit or a reservoir. The protective structure may be made of
concrete or masonry and the seal is usually made of puddled clay and sometimes plastic. A screened overflow pipe
guarantees that the water can flow freely out of the spring at all times. To prevent contamination infiltrating from the
surface, a ditch (known as the interceptor drain) diverts surface water away from the spring box and a fence keeps
animals out of the spring area. There are many types of spring captations, ranging from a simple headwall with backfill
to more complicated structures like tunnel systems for collecting water from a larger area.
Initial cost: Capital costs vary considerably and depend on a large number of factors. In Nepal, a relatively large spring
box serving 150 households including facilities for clothes washing was constructed for about US$ 1000 (1989
data, Rienstra 1990), including costs for unskilled labour. In Kenya, minor structures for an average of 110
persons were constructed for US$ 200, including a headwall, backfill, fencing, and labour and transportation
costs. Major spring structures for an average of 350 persons cost about US$ 400, including a spring box (1986
data, Nyangeri 1986).
Dimensions: From 0.5 m2 to many square metres.
Yield: From many litres per second to less than 0.1 l/s .
Area of use: In areas where groundwater arrives at the surface, usually at hillsides or mountainsides.
Construction: Spring water captation systems are constructed on-site, often by local craftsmen.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Water should be permitted to flow out freely all the time so that it will not find another way out of the aquifer. Operation
may include activities such as opening or closing valves to divert the water to a reservoir, a conduit or a drain. The spring
and surroundings must be kept clean.
Maintenance
Prevent contamination (e.g. from open defecation, latrines, cattle-gathering places, use of pesticides, chemicals, etc.)
both in the area where the spring water infiltrates into the ground (if possible) and in the immediate surroundings of the
spring. Check the surface drains, the animal-proof fence and gate, and repair if necessary. Protect from vegetative
growth both in the area where the spring water infiltrates into the ground (if possible) and in the immediate surroundings
of the spring (prevent clogging of the aquifer by growth of roots). Check the water flow from the spring box. If there is an
increase in turbidity or flow after a rain storm, surface run-off has to be identified and the protection of the spring
improved. If the water flow decreases, it has to be suspected that the collection system is clogged. It may then be
necessary to take out the gravel and replace with new gravel or, in case a seep collection system is used, to clean the
collection pipes. Regular water samples must be taken and analysed to check for evidence of faecal contamination.
Annually, open the washout and remove all accumulated silt. Check all screens; if damaged or blocked, replace with nonrusting materials, e.g. copper or plastic screening, and clean if dirty. After cleaning, make sure to close the washout
valve thoroughly and replace and seal the manhole cover. Disinfect the spring box every time a person enters to clean or
repair it, or when there is bacteriological contamination. Leaks in the protective seal, undermining of the headwall, and
damage caused by erosion or settlement of soil must be repaired.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
74
Organizational aspects
In many cases, springs are communally owned. Users may need to establish an association which can effectively deal
with issues such as control and supervision of water use, prevention of contamination of water, execution of O&M
activities, financing of O&M, monitoring of water quality and the system’s performance, etc. Proper management may
also prevent conflicts over these and other matters. For the execution of O&M tasks at the spring site, a person who
lives or farms near the site could be appointed. This person could also be made responsible for water allocation to users
at or near the site, and be involved in monitoring activities. His or her authority should be clear and accepted by all users.
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Clean well
surroundings
Weekly
Local
Check turbidity
After each flood
Local
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Broom, bucket, hoe,
machete
Check water quantity Occasionally
Local
Bucket, watch
Repair fence and
clean surface
drains
Occasionally
Local
Wood, rope, wire
Machete, axe, knife,
hoe, spade, pickaxe
Check water quality
Regularly
Area
Laboratory reagents
Laboratory equipment
Wash and disinfect
the spring
Annually
Local
Chlorine
Bucket, wrench,
brush
Repair piping and
valves
Occasionally
Local or area
Spare pipes and valves,
cement, sand, gravel
Bucket, trowel,
wrench, flat spanners
Repair cracks
Annually
Local
Cement, sand, gravel, clay
Bucket, trowel, hoe,
spade, wheelbarrow
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Use water, report malfunctioning, keep site clean,
assist in major repairs
No special skills
Caretaker
Keep site clean, check for damage, perform small
repairs
Basic skills
Water committee
Organize bigger repairs, control caretaker’s work
Organizational skills
Mason
Repair masonry or concrete
Masonry
External support
Check water quality, guide and stimulate local
organization
Microbial analysis,
extension work
e. Recurrent costs
Recurrent material costs are usually very low. The recurrent personnel costs, in cash or kind (for caretakers, watchmen,
labourers, committee members and craftsmen), will need to be added but will also usually be low. Total recurrent costs
are usually less than US$ 1 per year per capita, which often includes O&M costs for the water transport system. Several
sources report that “O&M costs are minimal and, for this reason, spring water technology is the technology of choice
wherever the sites permit it.” However, problems may arise when a sudden large investment is needed for a large repair
or replacement of the system.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
75
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Erosion or collapse of the spring box due to wrong design, construction errors, large surface
runoff flows, and damage caused by people or animals. Leaks in the box or leaking taps and valves. Contamination of the
spring water due to cracks in the seal or to people’s behaviour. Damaged piping because of faulty construction, abuse
or corrosion. Improper drainage of surface runoff, outflow and wastewater. Clogged pipes because of siltation or plant
roots. Poor accessibility for water users.
Limitations. Springs may not deliver enough water or become dry during certain seasons of the year. Not all springs
produce clean water of acceptable taste. Springs may be sited too far from households or on privately owned land. In
some cases, the cost of construction, large repairs or replacements may be beyond the capacity of communities. Some
spring water is very corrosive.
Remarks. Usually spring water is of good quality but this should be checked; examples exist where the water was fed
from a polluted stream which had gone underground or where the catchment area was contaminated. Unprotected
springs are almost always contaminated at the outlet.
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O&M FACT SHEET
Drilled well
a. Brief description of technology
Drilled wells, tubewells or boreholes give access to groundwater in an aquifer and facilitate its abstraction. They differ
from dug wells in the small diameter, generally varying between 0.10 m and 0.25 m for the casing, which does not allow
a person to enter for cleaning or deepening. The well is usually the most expensive part of a handpump drinking-water
supply project. Boreholes can be constructed by machine or by hand-operated equipment and usually consist of three
main parts:
■ At ground level, a concrete apron around the borehole with an outlet adapted to the water abstraction method
prevents surface water from seeping down the sides of the well, provides a hard standing, and directs wastewater
away from the well to a drainage channel.
■ Below ground but not in the desired aquifer(s), these parts are usually lined with pipe material (mostly PVC and
sometimes galvanized iron) to prevent it from collapsing, especially in unconsolidated formations. In consolidated
formations, a lining may not be required.
■ Below water level in the aquifer sections, the pipe material is slotted to allow groundwater to enter the well. A gravel
filter layer surrounding this part facilitates groundwater movement towards the slotted pipes and, at the same time,
prevents ground material from entering the well. In consolidated formations this gravel may not be required.
A proper combination of slot size, gravel filter and aquifer material, and extensive sand pumping before the well is
brought into production (well development) can considerably improve long-term performance.
Initial cost: Capital costs vary considerably and depend on a large number of factors. According to Arlosoroff et al.
(1987), the initial cost for a 50 m deep hand-drilled well in the alluvial plains in South Asia could be as low as
US$ 200. More recent data state that typical costs for a 50 m drilled well in India were US$ 770 and in Mozambique US$ 10 000 (Wurzel & Rooy, 1993).
Range of depth: From a few metres to over 200 metres.
Yield: From less than 0.3 litre to over 10 litres per second.
Expected life: Over 25 years.
Area of use: In areas with suitable aquifers.
Construction: In most countries, drilled wells are constructed by public or private sector drilling companies.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Operation of the well itself is usually not required. When the production capacity of the well is lower than the demand,
daily monitoring of the water level may be necessary. Abstraction of the water from the well is usually done by the users,
often women and children, or by a caretaker.
Maintenance
Apart from cleaning the apron daily and occasionally cleaning the drain and repairing the fence, if there is one, there are
hardly any maintenance activities. Rarely, when a well has to be desilted or rehabilitated, all appliances have to be
removed and a specialized company will have to come and do the job. There are various rehabilitation techniques such
as forced air and water pumping, brushing, and treatment with chemicals. It is very difficult to deepen an existing drilled
well.
Organizational aspects
Users may need to establish an organization that can effectively deal with issues such as the control or supervision of
water use, prevention of water contamination, execution of O&M activities, financing of O&M, and monitoring of water
quality. Although the number of O&M activities required is limited and they usually cost very little, they should be given
ample attention, as many wells have been abandoned because they were contaminated or had collapsed as a result of
lack of maintenance.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
77
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Clean well site
Daily
Local
Broom, bucket
Clean drain
Occasionally
Local
Hoe, spade, wheelbarrow
Repair fence
Occasionally
Local
Wood, nails, wire etc.
Saw, machete, axe,
hammer, pliers, etc.
Repair apron
Annually
Local
Cement, sand, gravel
Trowel, bucket
Rehabilitate well
Very rarely
National
Gravel, pipe material etc.
Various special
equipment
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
Water user
Use water, keep site clean, assist with major
maintenance tasks
No special skills
Caretaker
Monitor water use, keep site clean
Basic skills for cleaning
and disinfection
Water committee
Supervise caretaker, organize major maintenance,
collect fees
Organizational skills
Specialized well
company
Rehabilitate the well
Very special skills
External support
Check water quality, stimulate and guide users’
organization
Microbial analysis,
extension work
e. Recurrent costs
Recurrent material costs are usually low. The recurrent personnel costs, in cash or kind (for caretakers, watchmen,
labourers, committee members and craftsmen), will need to be added but will also usually be low. Occasional large
maintenance activities such as rehabilitation of the well may require a high investment, which may pose problems if this
has to be financed by the community. The life expectancy of a good well is over twenty years but after a few years the
yield may diminish drastically and rehabilitation may be necessary. In Ghana (Baumann, 1993), rehabilitation costs were
estimated at US$ 750 once every ten years.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Bad water quality or collapse due to corrosion of the galvanized iron lining, poor water inflow
because of inadequately developed well, entrance of ground particles in the well because of wrong screens or wrong
development, contamination due to wrong apron design or construction or neglect of maintenance, collapsing of borehole
where no lining is applied or where the lining is not strong enough.
Limitations. Well construction depends on geohydrological conditions like presence, depth and yield of aquifers and
presence of rock formations above them. Wells constructed at locations which are too far from the users’ households,
or which are too difficult to reach, will not be sufficiently used or maintained. Wells should not be drilled near places with
latrines or where cattle gather and vice versa. The usually recommended minimum distance is 30 metres, although this
is no guarantee that contamination will not occur. The investment in labour, cash or kind needed for the construction of
an improved dug well may be beyond the capacity of the community. It may be impossible to transport the heavy
equipment and materials needed to the drilling site.
Remarks. In many cases, wells are not only used for drinking-water supply but also for irrigation. When assessing the
development potential of wells with the community, it is important to place this in a wider context, including all water uses
and their effect on water availability.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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O&M FACT SHEET
Rope and bucket: loose, through a pulley or on a windlass
a. Brief description of technology
Mostly used with hand-dug wells. A bucket on a rope is lowered into the water. When hitting the water, the bucket dips
and fills itself and is pulled up with the rope. The rope might be held only with the hands, run through a pulley or be wound
on a windlass. Sometimes animal traction is used in combination with a pulley. Improved systems use a rope through a
pulley and two buckets, one on each end of the rope. For water depths of less than 10 metres, one can use a windlass
with a hose running from the bottom of the bucket to a spout at the side of the well. Even with this system and a
protected well, hygiene is poorer than with a bucket pump.
Initial cost: US$ 6 for a plastic bucket and 5-metre rope to US$ 150 for a windlass, hose and closed superstructure in
Liberia (Milkov 1987).
Range of depth: 0–15 m (greater depths are possible).
Yield: 0.25 litre per sec at 10 m.
Area of use: All over the world, mainly in rural areas.
Construction: Buckets, ropes, pulleys and windlasses are manufactured locally; buckets and ropes also by larger
industries.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Lower and raise the bucket by paying out and pulling in the rope or rotating the windlass. One must be careful not to dirty
the rope or bucket.
Maintenance
Preventive maintenance consists of greasing the bearings of the windlass or pulley. Small repairs are limited to patching
of holes in bucket and hose, reconnecting the bucket hinge and fixing the windlass bearings or handle. All repairs can be
done by local people and with tools and materials available in the community or area. Other repairs and replacements
mainly consist of replacing a bucket, hose, rope or part or all of the windlass. Woven nylon ropes may last two years,
twined nylon or sisal ropes only last a couple of months. A good quality hose may last over two years and buckets,
depending on material and quality, may last a year.
Organizational aspects
When people use their own rope and bucket, no extra organization is required. For community wells, usually a committee
organizes the maintenance and cleaning of the well, maintenance of the windlass, etc. Most repairs can be paid with ad
hoc fund-raising.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
79
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Grease axles of
windlass or pulley
Every two weeks
Local
Grease or oil
Lubricator
Replace bucket
Each year
Local
Bucket, wire
Knife
Replace rope
Every two years
Local
Rope, wire
Knife
Replace hose
Every two years
Local
Hose, wire, rubber straps
from tyres
Knife, tongs
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Lower and lift the bucket
Keep site clean
Warn in case of malfunctioning
No special skills
Caretaker
Keep site clean, do small repairs
Basic maintenance
Water committee
Organize well cleaning, collect fees
Organizing skills
Local artisan
Repair of bucket, windlass, well cover, etc.
Tinkering, carpentry
Shopkeeper/trader
Sale of rope, bucket, etc.
No special skills
External support
Check water quality, stimulate and guide local organization
Microbial analysis,
extension work
e. Recurrent costs
These consist in occasional purchase of rope, bucket, hose, wire, etc. Occasional windlass repair costs are low. Annual
per capita costs for rope and bucket in Upper Volta were reported to range from US$ 0.56 to 1.36 (Hofkes, 1983).
These costs varied with the depth of the well and family size.
f. Problems and limitations
Frequent problems. Fast deterioration of bad quality rope. Sisal rope only lasts for a few months. Bucket falls into the
well. To prevent this, communities can keep a spare bucket available and fit the bucket in a protective cage, for instance
like the design described by D. Carty (1990). In windlass with hose systems the hose breaks frequently.
Limitations. Very poor hygiene, especially when the rope and bucket touch the hands or ground. Communal wells often
tend to get more contaminated than family-owned wells. Therefore the latter should be aimed for where possible. Only
suitable for limited depths, although examples are known of rope and bucket systems exceeding 50 metres.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
80
O&M FACT SHEET
Direct-action handpump
a. Brief description of technology
Direct-action handpumps are usually made of PVC and other plastics and installed on boreholes of limited depth. The
user at the pumpstand directly moves the pump rod in an up-and-down motion, holding a T-bar handle. The plunger at the
lower end of the pump rod is located under the groundwater level. On the up-stroke, the plunger lifts water into the rising
main and replacement water is drawn into the cylinder through the foot valve.
On the down-stroke, the foot valve closes, and water passes the plunger to be lifted on the next up-stroke. The elimination of the mechanical advantage (which, for example, deep-well handpumps have through a lever or flywheel) restricts
the application of direct-action pumps to the depth from which an individual can physically lift the column of water (about
12 m). The mechanical simplicity and the potential for low-cost, lightweight construction makes these pumps well equipped
to meet VLOM (Village Level Operation and Maintenance) objectives.
Initial cost: Varying from about US$ 100 to over US$ 900 (1985 prices, Arlosoroff et al., 1987). Models that are
particularly suitable for village level O&M cost less than US$ 150.
Range of depth: 0–12 metres.
Yield: 0.25–0.42 litre per sec at 12 m.
Area of use: Rural and low-income peri-urban areas where groundwater tables are within 12 m from the surface.
Construction: Blair, Ethiopia BP50, Malawi Mark V, Nira AF85, Tara, Wavin.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
The pump is operated by moving the handle up and down. As the plunger is located under water, no priming is needed.
Adults and even children can pump, although if the water table is more than 5 metres it may be difficult for children.
Pumpstand and site must be kept clean.
Maintenance
Maintenance of direct-action pumps is relatively simple and can be taught to users or caretakers, sometimes within a few
hours. For preventive maintenance, usually only one or two persons are needed. Activities consist in checking pump
performance and appearance of the water daily (if the water is cloudy with silt, the borehole must be cleaned). The pump
should be taken apart and checked annually. Small repairs are the replacement of worn cupseals and washers, straightening of bent pump rods, and replacement of corroded lock nuts. For major repairs (e.g. broken pump rod or rising main,
cracks in welding of metal parts), more highly skilled persons may be needed.
Organizational aspects
O&M can very well be organized at community level. As maintenance is relatively simple, good organization will result in
a reliable service.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
81
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Clean pump and site
Daily
Local
Check performance
Daily
Local
Check whole pump
Annually
Local
Replace cupseals
and washers
Occasionally
Local
Cupseals, washers
Spanners, screwdriver
Replace pump rod
and/or pump handle
Occasionally
Local
Pump rod, pump handle
Spanners, wrench
Replace cylinder
and/or plunger
and/or foot valve
Occasionally
Local or area
Cylinder, plunger,
foot valve
Spanners, wrench,
screwdriver
Repair rising mains
Occasionally
Local or area
PVC tubing, PVC solvent
and sandpaper or galvanized
iron tubing, teflon or hemp
Saw and file or two
pipe wrenches
Repair pump platform
Annually
Local
Cement, sand, gravel
Bucket, trowel
Broom
Spanners, screwdriver
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Pump water
Keep site clean
Warn in case of malfunctioning
No special skills required
Caretaker
Keep site clean
Do small repairs
Check pump annually
Basic maintenance skills
Water committee
Organize maintenance collect fees
Basic organizational skills
Local merchant
Sell spare parts
No special skills
Local or area mechanic
Perform more major repairs
Welding
External support
Check water quality
Stimulate and guide local organization
Microbial analysis,
extension work
e. Recurrent costs
Apart from personnel costs, recurrent costs mainly consist in expenses for spare parts. In Ghana the annual costs
recently were found to be US$ 3.35 per capita per year or US$ 0.61 per m3, based on 15 litres/capita/day, including
capital amortization and other costs at an interest rate of 10% (Baumann 1993a). According to Reynolds (1992), a Tara
handpump can be sustained for about US$ 0.10 per user per year.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Worn washers, plungers and footvalve parts. Abrasion of the seal on the PVC cylinder and
between the pump rod and rising main (nitrile rubber seals have proven substantially better). Broken or damaged
handles.
Limitations. The maximum lift is limited to about 12 m. The forces required at the handle to pump the water may be too
high for children, especially when the water table is deeper than 5 m.
Remarks. At least a moderate industrial base is recommended for manufacturing these pumps, because good quality
PVC is needed. Some designs have a relatively low discharge (Peter. 1990).
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
82
O&M FACT SHEET
Deep-well piston handpump
a. Brief description of technology
In a deep-well piston handpump, the piston is placed in a cylinder below the water level which is usually in the range of 15
to 45 metres below the ground. The pumping motion by the user at the pumpstand is transferred to the piston by means
of a series of connected pumping rods inside the rising main. On the up-stroke, the plunger lifts water into the rising main
and replacement water is drawn into the cylinder through the footvalve. On the down-stroke, the footvalve closes, and
water passes the plunger to be lifted on the next up-stroke. The pumping height is limited only by the effort needed to lift
water to the surface. Nowadays most cylinders have an open top, which allows the piston and footvalve to be removed
through the rising main for servicing and repairs while the rising main and cylinder can stay in place. The pump rods have
special connectors allowing for assembly and dismantling with no or only very simple tools. The joints incorporate pump
rod centralizers that prevent wear of the rising main. To a large extent improved models can be maintained at village
level.
Initial cost: For well depths of 25–35 m, prices vary from about US$ 40 for a cylinder, plunger and footvalve set, to be
installed under a locally made pump head, to over US$ 2300 for a complete pump with many stainless steel
parts (1985 prices, Arlosoroff et al.). Most good pumps cost US$ 300–500.
Range of depth: 15–45 metres, depths up to about 100 m are possible
Yield: 0.25–0.36 litre per sec at 25 m and 0.18–0.28 litre per sec at 45 m depth
Useful life: 6 to 12 years
Area of use: Rural and low-income peri-urban areas where groundwater tables are within 100 m, but preferably within
45 m from the surface
Construction: Afridev/Aquadev, Bestobell Micro, Bush pump, Blair pump, India Mark II and III, Kardia, Tropic (Duba),
UPM, Volanta, etc.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Operation of the pump is done by moving a handle up and down or by rotating the handle of a flywheel. This can be done
by adults and even children. Handle forces are usually kept within acceptable limits (depending on brand and lifting
heights). Pump and site must be kept clean.
Maintenance
Preventive maintenance usually consists in checking pump functioning and cleaning the pump and site daily, greasing
weekly, checking all parts of the pump stand monthly, and taking the whole pump apart for a check, cleaning the parts
with clean water and painting the pump stand annually. Pump rods that show bad corrosion must be replaced. Under
normal conditions, a galvanized steel pump rod needs replacement every five to six years. Rising mains consisting of
galvanized iron have to be removed and checked and pipes with badly corroded threads must be replaced. Small repairs
are the replacement of bearings, cupseals and washers, straightening bent pumping rods, etc. Major repairs may involve
the replacement of the plunger, footvalve, cylinder, pump rods, rising main, pump handle, fulcrum, etc. With open-top
cylinder pumps, all preventive maintenance activities can normally be executed by a village pump caretaker. For major
repairs and problems, external support may be needed. Closed-top cylinder pumps often need special lifting equipment
to pull up the rising main and cylinder for maintenance of parts down in the hole.
Organizational aspects
Most deep well pumps are too expensive for family use and will have to be used at communal level. The price of these
pumps also means extra effort in fund-raising. Communities have to organize themselves in order to maintain the pump
in good working condition. Often a caretaker is appointed and a pump committee coordinates activities. External support is often provided by state or nongovernmental organizations but becomes costly. In some cases small private
enterprises, paid directly by the communities, are now doing this job very satisfactorily.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
83
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Clean pump and site
Daily
Local
Grease bearings
Weekly
Local
Check pump stand parts
Monthly
Local
Replace pump
stand parts
Occasionally
Local
Nuts and bolts, bearings,
pump handle
Spanners, screwdriver
Replace cupseals
Annually or
less
Local or area
Cupseals
Spanners, wrench,
knife, screwdriver etc.
Redo threads in
pump rod or main
Occasionally
Local or area
Oil
Pipe threader, tackle
Replace footvalve,
plunger or cylinder
Occasionally
Area
Footvalve, plunger or
cylinder
Spanners, wrench
Replace pump rod
or main
Occasionally
Area
Pump rods or main tubing
Spanners, wrench,
pipe threader
Repair platform
Annually
Local
Gravel sand, cement
Bucket, trowel
Broom, brush
Grease or oil
Lubricator
Spanner
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Pump water
Keep site clean
Warn in case of malfunctioning
No special skills
Caretaker
Keep site clean
Regularly check pump
Do small repairs
Basic maintenance
Water committee
Supervise caretaker
Collect fees
Organizing skills
Area mechanic
Perform more major repairs
Some special skills,
depending on brand
External support
Check water quality, stimulate and guide local organization
Microbial analysis, extension work
e. Recurrent costs
The costs for preventive maintenance may range between US$ 12 and US$ 60 per pump per year for spare parts and
materials (based on price indications from several brands). The recurrent personnel costs, in cash or kind (for caretakers, committee members, and, in case larger repairs are needed, mechanics or other skilled people), will need to
be added.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Replacement of plunger seals is the most common repair needed. Problems with local manufacture, centring mostly around quality control, are often reported, especially in African countries. Hook and eye connections of pump rods tend to break more often than conventional connections. Rods also reportedly get disconnected or
bend spontaneously sometimes. Especially where groundwater is corrosive, corrosion has been reported to affect the
pump rods (if not made of stainless steel), the rising main (if galvanized iron), the cylinder, and the pump head bearing
housing and other pump stand parts. Broken or shaky handles, mainly due to worn-out or otherwise affected bearings.
Limitations. The maximum lift differs by brand, varying between about 45 and 100 metres. The forces required to turn
the handle of the pump may be high in certain cases, depending on the brand and on the depth of the well.
Remarks. The quality of the material used for the rising main should be as high as possible to reduce the number of
repairs needed on this part. Many of these pumps can be produced in developing countries. Rigorous quality control is
needed. Piston pumps may be driven by a windmill but often rotary pumps are preferred because of their lower starting
torque.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
84
O&M FACT SHEET
Diesel engine
a. Brief description of technology
Diesel engines are very often used as a stationary power source. The main parts of the engine are the cylinders, pistons,
valves, and crankshaft. The number of cylinders may vary from one to more than six. When air is heavily compressed by
a piston inside a cylinder and diesel fuel is injected to it, this mixture comes to a controlled explosion that moves the
piston. This movement is transferred to the crankshaft and from there it can be put to use, for example to drive a pump
or an electricity generator. Valves in the cylinder regulate the inflow of fuel and air and the outflow of exhaust gasses. A
high pressure pump forces the diesel fuel into the cylinder at the right moment. Diesel engines differ from petrol engines
in that they use a different fuel, do not have spark ignition plugs and work at much higher pressures. Efficiency of diesel
engines is higher and they need less maintenance than petrol engines. Engines can differ in size, speed (revolutions per
minute), cycle (two-stroke and four-stroke cycles), cooling system (water or air), etc. Generally, low-speed four-stroke
engines last longer and high speed two-stroke engines produce more power per kg of engine weight. Water-cooled
engines generally need less maintenance than air-cooled engines.
Initial cost: From US$ 200 per kW for 25 kW engines to US$ 600 per kW for 2 kW engines (1990 data, McGowan and
Hodgkin, 1992); installation and other costs not included.
Range of power: Commonly starting at 2 kW
Life cycle: Average 20 000 hours of operation ranging from less than 5000 to 50 000 hours, depending on the quality
of the engine, installation and O&M.
Area of use: All over the world, especially for high-power needs and where no grid electricity is available.
Trademarks: Kubota, Lister-Petter, Lambardini and many others.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
The engine must be operated by a trained caretaker. Every engine has its own typical operating instructions. Before
starting it, the levels of fuel, oil and cooling water (if not air-cooled) are checked. If these levels are low, extra fuel, oil or
water has to be added. During operation, the fuel level, oil pressure, and engine speed are checked and also the
functioning of the pump or generator. Some moving parts may need manual lubrication. When the engine is operated at
very low speeds, its efficiency is low and carbon builds up rapidly in the engine, increasing the need for servicing. All data
on liquid levels and running hours are written down in a log book.
Maintenance
Every day the outside of the engine must be cleaned, and in dusty conditions the air filter must be checked and cleaned.
Some parts may need manual lubrication. In moderately dusty conditions, oil-bath air filters are cleaned once a week,
dry-paper air filters a little less frequently. The engine is serviced for preventive maintenance according to the number of
hours it has run. Every 50 hours, the clutch (if present) must be greased. Every 250 hours, clean all filters (replace if
necessary), change oil, check nuts and bolts and exhaust pipe. Every 1500 hours, major service overhaul with decarbonizing, adjusting valve clearance, etc. If the engine is connected to a pump or generator with a V-belt, this will regularly
need replacement. Once a year the engine house must be painted and occasionally repaired. If a generator is present it
will have its own maintenance needs. The Table below shows only the most important O&M activities.
Organizational aspects
Diesel engines require a lot of simple maintenance and, if this is done well, they can have a long service life. Therefore
training and supervision of the caretaker are important. More complicated maintenance tasks and repairs have to be
done by a well-trained mechanic with access to sufficient spare parts. Good organization will guarantee scheduled
services at the right times and a quick response in case of breakdown.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
85
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Check liquid levels
and add if necessary
Daily
Local
Fuel, engine oil, cooling
liquid
Funnels, containers
for liquids
Start and stop engine
Daily
Local
Keep logbook
Daily
Local
Paper, pen
Check air filter, clean
Daily or weekly
or replace if necessary
Local
New dry paper filter, or
kerosene and engine oil
Check for oil and
fuel leaks
Weekly
Local
Tighten nuts and bolts
Weekly
Local
Change engine oil
Every 250 hours
Local
Engine oil
Spanners
Clean or replace
filters
Regularly
Local
Oil filter, fuel filter
Spanners, special
tools
Decarbonize, clean
injector nozzles,
adjust valves, etc.
Every 500 to
2000 hours
Specialist
Wrench
Spanners
Spanners, brass wire
brush, special tools
Replace drive belt
Regularly
Local
Drive belt
Spanners
Replace engine parts
Occasionally
Specialist
Nozzles, injectors, gaskets,
bearings, fuel pump, etc.
Depending on part to
be replaced
Repair engine
mounting and housing
Occasionally
Local or area
Cement, sand, gravel, nuts
and bolts, nails, galvanized
corrugated iron sheets,
wood, etc.
Trowel, bucket,
hammer,chisel, saw,
spanners, etc.
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
Caretaker
Operate engine, keep logbook, perform minor service,
warn in case of irregularities
Special training is needed
for basic diesel O&M
Water committee
Supervise caretaker, collect fees, organize major service
and repairs
Organizational skills
Area mechanic
Perform major service and repairs
Special training needed
External support
Train caretaker and area mechanics
Training and technical skills
e. Recurrent costs
Where fuel and spare parts are scarce, the costs for these may amount to 50% of the annual system capital cost
(McGowan and Hodgkin, 1992).
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Excessive wear due to wrong O&M, neglect or misunderstanding. Rapid carbon buildup and low
efficiency due to running the engine under full loading. Broken drive belts.
Limitations. Frequent maintenance. High fuel costs and difficulty to get fuel. From time to time a specialist mechanic is
needed for service and repairs.
Remarks. Diesel engines are especially suited for high stationary power output. With good maintenance they are
dependable energy sources. It is very important to select a brand of good reputation and locally available service and
spare parts.
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O&M FACT SHEET
Chlorination in piped water supply systems
a. Brief description of technology
Chlorination is a chemical method for disinfecting water which kills nearly all pathogens and provides a barrier against
reinfection. It can be applied as the last stage in a drinking-water treatment process or as the only measure when the
water quality is already reasonably good. The most frequently used low technology methods are batch chlorination and
flow chlorination.
For batch chlorination a concentrated chlorine solution is added to the water in a reservoir with inlets and outlets closed.
The water is stirred and the chlorine is left to react for at least 30 minutes. After that, the outlets can be opened. When
the reservoir is empty the outlets are closed, the reservoir is refilled and a new batch is disinfected. This method will not
be discussed further in this fact sheet.
Flow chlorinators continuously feed small quantities of weakly concentrated chlorine solution to a flow of fresh water,
often at the instream of a clear water reservoir. Usually a small reservoir containing the chlorine solution is placed on top
of the water reservoir and the solution is administered close to the point where the fresh water comes in and turbulence
guarantees good mixing. A special device like the floating bowl chlorinator enables precise dosage. Sometimes a
special electric pump is used for this purpose. For on-site chlorine production, electrical devices can be bought that
convert a solution of kitchen salt to a chlorine solution (Oliveira, Tavares and Meyers, 1995).
Chlorine doses must be monitored and adjusted to the water quality and quantity. For this purpose, small test kits are
available. Chlorine-producing chemicals must be stored and prepared with care.
Initial cost: A chlorinator and hoses can cost as little as US$ 15. This excludes the cost of the tank for the concentrated
solution and the construction costs of a protective shelter.
Yield: Generally 350 to 1400 m3 of treated water per kg of 70% chlorine compound.
Area of use: Where drinking-water needs extra disinfection and chlorine is available.
Trademarks: Chlorine compounds have many trademarks.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
The chlorine tank has to be refilled with a freshly prepared solution once or twice a week. The flow rate has to be checked
and adjusted if necessary. Operators must be very careful to avoid contact of chlorine compounds or solutions with eyes
or clothes. In some cases, a logbook is kept with data on the amounts of chlorine applied and residual chlorine levels
measured. Chlorination can easily be learnt.
Maintenance
Chlorinators regularly have to be adjusted and cleaned of chlorine salts. When hoses get affected by chlorine they have
to be replaced. If a steel chlorine tank is used, it must be painted and checked for corrosion annually. Protective gloves
and utensils used for the preparation of the chlorine solution occasionally need replacement, and the shelter of the
chlorine solution tank needs maintenance.
Organizational aspects
Usually the water committee appoints a caretaker who is trained for the job. The chlorine compound has to be obtained
through a merchant or the health department and an adequate supply of chlorine compound must be kept in stock. An
external organization like a governmental health or water department will have to provide training for caretakers and
monitoring.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
87
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Refill chlorine tank
Once or twice
a week
Local
Chlorine compound, water
Spoon, scale, bucket,
stirring rod
Adjust and clean
chlorinator
Regularly
Local
Water
Measuring cup,
stopwatch
Replace hose or
chlorinator
Occasionally
Local
Hose, small tubes of plastic,
glass etc., plug, bowl
Knife, nail
Paint steel tank
Annually
Local
Latex paint
Steel brush, paint
brush
Check and adjust
doses
Regularly
Area
Test medium, water sample
Test kit
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
Caretaker
Refill chlorine tank and prepare solution, clean and adjust
chlorinator, perform small repairs
Basic skills
Water committee
Supervise caretaker, collect fees
Organizational skills
Local health worker, Provide or sell chlorine compound
shopkeeper or
merchant
No special skills
External support
Basic testing and
calculation, training skills
Check residual chlorine in water and adjust doses,
train caretaker
e. Recurrent costs
Recurrent costs for chlorine-producing chemicals in the USA are about US$ 7 per kg of available chlorine. In other
countries this figure may differ substantially. One kg of available chlorine (1.4 to 4 kg of compound) is needed for
disinfection of 500–2000 m3 of water. Cost of rubber gloves, hoses and other spare parts is generally low. Apart from
this, there will be recurrent costs for the caretaker’s fee, monitoring and training.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Bad quality hoses wear quickly. Some chlorine compounds are very sensitive to storage conditions and rapidly lose strength. If the chlorinator gets clogged or residual chlorine is not monitored, disinfection may not
be sufficient.
Limitations. Chlorination does not kill all pathogenic organisms but is generally very effective. In alkaline water, pH
above 8, chlorination is less effective. When the water contains a lot of organic matter or suspended material, pretreatment will be needed. High cost and unavailability of the chlorine compound can be serious limitations.
Remarks. Chlorination affects the taste of water and for that reason may be rejected by consumers. On the other hand,
sometimes a chlorine taste is appreciated. The taste of chlorine in water is no proof of proper disinfection. Often a
chlorine taste is caused by the application of too little chlorine.
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O&M FACT SHEET
Slow sand filtration
a. Brief description of technology
Slow sand filter water purification is a combination of biological, chemical and physical processes occurring when water
slowly passes downwards through a bed of sand. Fine particles are filtered out, and in the sand and on top of the
filterbed a population of micro-organisms develops which feed on bacteria, viruses and organic matter in the water. The
filter reservoirs have drains on the bottom, covered with gravel and the filter sand. An inlet provides for smooth entrance
of the raw water and an outlet structure leads the clean water from the drains to the clean water mains. During operation
the filter sand is covered with a water layer of 0.3 to 1.0 m. For good functioning there must be a continuous flow in the
range of 0.1 to 0.3 m/hour. For community use, filter reservoirs can be made of concrete, bricks, ferrocement etc. At
least two filters are needed to provide continuous operation.
It is recommended to combine slow sand filters with a dynamic roughing filter pretreatment unit. When raw water quality
is low, adding upflow roughing filters is recommended. Sometimes the water is chlorinated afterwards to prevent
recontamination. For small-scale application, see also the fact sheet on household slow sand filter. With good operation
and maintenance a slow sand filter produces water virtually free from harmful organisms.
Initial cost: Data from rural India, in 1983, indicated US$ 60–130 per m2 of filter area. In Colombia, this was US$ 105–
215 per m2 in 1987.
Yield: 0.1–0.3 m/hour or 0.028–0.083 litres per sec per m2.
Area of use: All over the world.
Manufacturers: Slow sand filters can be built by experienced building contractors or even by communities, with external technical assistance.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Operation of a slow sand filter is crucial to its effectiveness. The flow of water must be maintained in the range of 0.1–
0.3 m per hour to provide the organisms in the filter with a stable flow of nutrients and oxygen and give them time to
purify the water. After several weeks to a few months the population of micro-organisms gets too dense and starts to
clog the filter. Depending on the filter design, flow rates may have to be adjusted accordingly or the layer of supernatant
water on the filter will get too high. The caretaker of a slow sand filter keeps a logbook with flow rates and operation and
maintenance activities. Slow sand filters can be operated and even monitored by communities, provided caretakers are
trained well. It takes less than one hour a day for a caretaker to check the functioning and adjust the flow rates. Cleaning
the site and other activities may take more time.
Maintenance
When flow velocities get too low the filter is drained and the top layer of the sand is scraped off, washed, dried in the sun
and stored. After several scrapings the sand is restored, together with new sand to make up for losses during washing.
It takes one day for several people to clean a filter unit. Hygienic measures must be taken every time someone enters a
filter unit for maintenance or inspection. Valves must be opened and closed every two months to keep them from getting
stuck. Any leaks must be repaired immediately. If well-designed and constructed, hardly any repairs of the filter tanks and
drainage system will be needed, although valves and metal tubing may need occasional attention. Test kits are available
which only require some basic training to monitor water quality.
Organizational aspects
A slow sand filter for community use requires some organization in order to have enough workers for scraping and
resanding the filter units. A local caretaker will have to be trained and some other people may need training for water
quality testing and to be able to replace the caretaker. It may take some time for people to get to trust that a green and
slimy filter is capable of producing safe water. Apart from extra sand, some chlorine and test materials very few external
inputs are needed. With proper external assistance, water organizations can become very independent in managing their
water treatment.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
89
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Check inflow
Daily
Local
Regulate flow
Daily
Local
Keep logbook
Daily
Local
Logbook, pen
Clean site
Daily
Local
Broom
Scrape off sand,
wash, dry and store
About every six
weeks
Local
Water, disinfectant for tools,
boots or feet
Wheelbarrow, hoe, rake,
spade, rope, bucket,
ladder, planks, broom,
wash basin
Resand filter
About every
18 months
Local
Recycled and new sand,
water, disinfectant for tools,
boots or feet
Sieve, wheelbarrow, hoe,
rake, spade, rope,
bucket, ladder, planks
Repair valve
Occasionally
Local
Washers, spare valve
Spanners, screwdriver,
wrench
Replace metal tubing
Occasionally
Local or area
Nipples and accessories,
plumbing sealant or teflon,
cement, sand
Steel saw, wrench, pipe
threader, hammer,
chisel, trowel, bucket
Disinfect filter outlets
Occasionally
Local
Chlorine
Bucket, brush
Analyse water quality
Regularly
Local or area
Water sample, test media
Test kit
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
Local caretaker
Regulate flow, keep site clean, scraping and resanding
Fair understanding of filter
process and hygiene,
organizational skills
Water user or paid
worker
Assist in scraping and resanding of filter units
No special skills
Water committee
Supervise caretaker, monitor water quality, collect fees,
organize scraping and resanding
Organizational skills, basic
water quality testing
Local plumber
Repair valves and piping
Basic plumbing
External support
Train caretaker, monitor water quality
Training and microbial
testing skills
e. Recurrent costs
The caretaker’s fee and the cost of additional sand are the main recurrent costs, assuming that the users occasionally do
some of the work free of charge.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. If flow rates through the filter are too high, water quality drops. Excessive turbidity (>30 NTU) in
the raw water can cause the filter to clog rapidly; in this case a prefilter may be needed. When water quality is very bad,
harmful and badly tasting products like NH3 and H2NO3 may be formed in the lower layers of the filter. If water flow is
interrupted for more than a few hours, beneficial micro-organisms in the filter may die and filter action is disturbed.
Smooth vertical surfaces can cause short circuits in the water flow, producing poor quality water.
Limitations. In some regions, sand is expensive or difficult to get. Slow sand filters require a substantial initial investment and dedicated operation and maintenance.
Remarks. After re-sanding a filter it takes a few days to ripen; in this period water quality is lower.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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O&M FACT SHEET
Public standpost
a. Brief description of technology
At a public standpost or tapstand people from several households can take water from one or more taps. Because they
are used by many people and are often not so well taken care of, their design and construction must be sturdy compared
with domestic connections. The standpost includes a service connection to the supplying water conduit, a supporting
column or wall, and one or more 0.5-inch (or 1.25-cm) taps protruding far enough from this column or wall to enable easy
filling of the water containers.
The taps can be a globe or a self-closing type. The column or wall may be of wood, brickwork, dry stone masonry,
concrete, etc. Some standposts have a regulating valve in the connection to the mains, which can be set and locked to
limit maximum flow. A water meter may also be included. A solid stone or concrete slab or apron under the tap and a
drainage system must lead spilled water away and prevent the formation of muddy pools. A fence may be needed to
keep cattle away. The residual pressure head of the water at the tapstand should preferably be between 10 and 30
metres and should never be under 7 or over 56 metres. The location and design of public standposts have to be
determined in close collaboration with the future users.
Initial cost: In 1995, the cost of a self-closing tap for 0.5 to 1-inch pipes was US$ 12 (UNDP/APSO, 1995). Cheaper
taps can be found. Other costs depend largely on the standpost design.
Number of taps: Usually 1 to 3, or more.
Users per tap: Maximum 200 people.
Yield: 0.2–0.4 litres per sec per tap.
Area of use: Piped public water systems.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Users clean and fill their containers at the tap. Bathing and washing of clothes is usually not permitted at the standpost
itself. The tap site has to be cleaned daily and the drain inspected.
Maintenance
The drain must be cleaned at least once a month. Formation of pools must be prevented at all times. Occasionally, a
rubber washer or other part of a tap may have to be replaced. The fence may need repair too. Serious cracks in the
structure must also be repaired, and when wood rots it must be treated or replaced. Occasionally the tubing may leak or
need replacement.
Organizational aspects
A caretaker or tap committee may be appointed to keep the tap functioning and the surroundings clean, and to regulate
the amounts of water used. The committee may also collect the fees for water use. Sometimes water vendors fill their
tanks at public tapstands at special rates for resale to people living far away.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
91
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Tap water
Daily
Local
Jar, bucket, can, etc.
Clean site
Daily
Local
Broom or brush
Inspect and clean drain Daily
Local
Hoe, spade
Repair or replace valve Occasionally
Local
Rubber or leather washer,
gland seal, Teflon, flax,
spare valve
Spanners, screwdriver, pipe wrench
Repair fence
Occasionally
Local
Wood, steel wire, nails
Machete, pliers,
hammer
Repair valve stand,
apron or drain
Occasionally
Local
Wood, nails, cement, sand,
water, etc.
Hammer, saw, trowel,
bucket, etc.
Repair piping
Occasionally
Local
Pipe nipples, connectors,
elbows etc., oil, Teflon,
flax or plumbing putty
Pipe wrench, pipe
cutter, saw, file, pipe
threader
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Tap water, keep site clean
No special skills
Caretaker or tap
committee
Clean site, perform small repairs, collect fees
Basic skills
Communal water
committee
Organize more major repairs, collect fees
Organizing and
bookkeeping skills
Mason
Repair tapstand and apron
Masonry
Plumber
Repair piping and taps
Basic plumbing
External support
Monitor hygiene, train committee members
Training skills and microbial
testing
e. Recurrent costs
Recurrent costs for a tapstand comprise a few minor repairs to the taps every year and occasional repairs to the pipes,
column, wall, apron or drain.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Tampering, insufficient maintenance, and conflicts over use due to bad location of tapstand or
unsolved social problems. Poor drainage. Often taps are not closed after use and even left open on purpose to irrigate
a nearby plot. Tapstands at the tail end of a piped system often have insufficient water pressure.
Limitations. If people are willing to organize communal use and maintenance, the only limitation is the cost.
Remarks. Special attention should be given to how the water is handled after collection at the tapstand in order to
prevent subsequent contamination.
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O&M FACT SHEET
Ventilated improved pit latrine
a. Brief description of technology
Ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines are designed to reduce two problems frequently encountered by traditional latrine
systems—smells and flies or other insects. A VIP latrine differs from a traditional latrine in having a vent pipe covered
with a fly screen. Wind blowing across the top of the vent pipe creates a flow of air which sucks out the foul-smelling
gases from the pit. As a result, fresh air is drawn into the pit through the drop hole and the superstructure is kept free
from smells. The vent pipe also has an important role to play in fly control. Flies are attracted to light and if the latrine is
suitably dark inside, they will fly up the vent pipe to the light. They cannot escape because of the fly screen, so they are
trapped at the top of the pipe until they dehydrate and die. Female flies, searching for an egg-laying site, are attracted by
the odours from the vent pipe but are prevented from flying down the pipe by the fly screen at its top.
VIP latrines can also be constructed with a double pit. The latrine has two shallow pits, each with its own vent pipe but
only one superstructure. The cover slab has two drop holes, one over each pit. Only one pit is used at a time. When this
becomes full, its drop hole is covered and the second pit is used. After a period of at least one year, the contents of the
first pit can be removed safely and used as soil conditioner. The pit can be used again when the second pit has filled up.
This alternating cycle can be repeated indefinitely.
Initial cost: Single-pit VIP family latrine: about US$ 70–400.
Double-pit VIP family latrine: about US$ 200–600. Prices include the cost of materials (60–80%), transport
(5–30%), and local labour (10–25%). Prices depend on the pit volume; quality of the lining, slab and superstructure; extent to which locally available materials are used; and the country or region.
Area of use: Rural or peri-urban areas, household and public use.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Operation of pit latrines is quite simple and consists in regularly cleaning the slab with water (and a little disinfectant if
available) to remove any excreta and urine. The door must always be closed so the superstructure remains dark inside.
The drop hole should never be covered as this would impede the airflow. Appropriate anal cleaning materials should be
available in or near the latrine. Stones, glass, plastic, rags, and other non-biodegradable materials should not be thrown
in the pit as they reduce the effective volume of the pit and hinder mechanical emptying.
Maintenance
Every month the floor slab has to be checked for cracks and the vent pipe and fly screen must be inspected to ensure
they are not corroded or damaged. Rainwater should drain away from the latrine. Any damage should be repaired. Repair
of the superstructure (especially light leaks) may be necessary too. When the contents of the pit reach the level of 0.5
metre below the slab, a new pit has to be dug and the old pit covered with soil. Another possibility is to empty the pit
mechanically. With double-pit systems, the second pit is used when the first is full. The full pit can be emptied safely by
hand after a period of a year or longer and is then ready for use again.
Organizational aspects
Where latrines are used by a single household, O&M tasks are implemented by the household itself or by hired workers.
If two or more households use the latrine, arrangements for rotation of cleaning tasks have to be made and agreed upon
to avoid conflict. Pits can only be emptied manually if their contents have been left to decompose for at least a year. In
all other cases, either new pits have to be dug when a pit is full or the pit has to be emptied mechanically. If double-pit
latrines are used, the users must fully understand the concept of the system in order to be able to operate it properly.
User education has to cover aspects such as the reasons for switching after using only one pit at a time, use of excreta
as manure, and the need to leave the full pit for at least a year before emptying. The users also need to know how to
switch pits and how to empty the pit, even when they do not do these tasks themselves. Where these tasks are carried
out by privately hired labourers, the latter must also be educated in the operational requirements of the system.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
93
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Clean drop hole, seat
and superstructure
Daily
Household
Water, soap
Brush, bucket
Inspect floor slab,
Monthly
vent pipe and fly screen
Household
Clean fly screen and
vent inside
Every one to
six months
Household
Water
Twig or long bendable
brush
Repair slab, seat, vent
pipe, fly screen or
superstructure
Occasionally
Household or
local workers
Cement, sand, water, nails
local building materials
Bucket or bowl,
trowel, saw, hammer,
knife
Dig new pit and
transfer latrine slab
and superstructure
(if applicable)
Depending on
Household or
size and number local workers
of users
Sand, possibly cement,
Shovels, picks,
bricks, nails and other local buckets, hammer,
building materials
saw, etc.
Switch to other pit
when pit is full
Depending on
Household or
size and number local workers
of users
Shovels, buckets,
wheelbarrow, etc.
Empty pit
(if applicable)
Depending on
By hand: household
size and number or local workers
of users
(not recommended)
By mechanical
means: specialized
service
By hand: water
By hand: shovel,
bucket
By mechanical means:
water, spare parts for
machinery
By mechanical
means: pitemptying equipment
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Use latrine, keep clean, inspect and perform small repairs,
Understanding of hygiene
empty full pit and switch over, dig new pit and replace latrine
Local unskilled
workers
(sweepers/
scavengers)
Dig pits, transfer structures, empty full pits in double-pit
systems, small repairs, solving small problems
Knowledge about the concept
of a double-pit system (when
working with such systems),
knowing how to solve simple
problems.
Local mason
Build and repair or transfer latrines
Basic masonry, latrine building
Health department
Monitor latrines and hygienic behaviour of users, train users
Training skills and
knowledge on sanitation
e. Recurrent costs
These costs are usually very low, maximum about US$ 1 to 2 per capita per year, as normally maintenance activities are
few (mainly cleaning) and can be done by the households themselves. Even if local labour has to be hired for digging a
new pit, the recurrent costs per time unit and user are low although paying in full may pose a problem. The same applies
to the cost of mechanical emptying of the pit. Emptying a double VIP latrine can be done by hand, either by the household
itself or by hired workers. Sometimes the humus can be sold to farmers.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
94
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Bad quality of the floor slab due to inappropriate materials or improper curing of concrete. Inferior
quality fly screens get damaged easily by the effects of solar radiation and foul gases. Improperly sited latrines can get
flooded or undermined. Children may be afraid to use the latrine because of the dark or because of fear of falling into the
pit. If the superstructure allows too much light to come in, flies will be attracted by the light coming through the squat
hole and may fly out into the superstructure; this may jeopardize the whole VIP concept. Odour problems may occur
during the night and early morning hours in latrines relying more on solar radiation for the air flow in the vent pipe than
on wind speed. Leakages between pits can occur because the dividing wall is not impermeable or the soil is too
permeable.
Limitations. In hard soils it may be impossible to dig a proper pit. Pits should preferably not reach groundwater level and
latrines must be 15 to 30 metres away from ground and surface water sources. VIP latrines cannot prevent mosquitos
from breeding in the pits. Families may not be able to bear the much higher costs for construction of a VIP latrine in
comparison to a simple pit latrine.
Remarks. Cultural resistance to handling human waste may prevent some households from emptying their double pits
themselves. Usually local workers can be hired to do the job.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
95
O&M FACT SHEET
Double-vault compost latrine
a. Brief description of technology
The double-vault compost latrine consists of two watertight chambers (vaults) to collect faeces. Urine is collected
separately as the contents of the vault have to be kept relatively dry. Initially, a layer of absorbent organic material is put
in the vault and after each use, the faeces is covered with ash (or sawdust, shredded leaves or vegetable matter) to
deodorize the faeces, soak up excessive moisture and improve the C/N ratio, which ensures that sufficient nitrogen is
retained to make a good fertilizer. When the first vault is three-quarters full, it is completely filled with dry powdered earth
and sealed so that the contents can decompose anaerobically. The second vault is used until it is three-quarters full and
the first vault is emptied by hand, the contents being used as fertilizer. The vaults have to be large enough to keep faeces
for at least a year in order to become pathogen-free. A superstructure is built over both vaults with a squat hole over
each vault which can be sealed off. The latrine can be built in any place as there is no risk of pollution from the watertight
chambers to the surroundings. Where there is rock or a high watertable, the vaults can be placed above the ground.
Initial cost: US$ 35–70 (in 1978 US$) in Guatemala (Winblad & Kilama, 1985). Prices include the cost of materials and
local labour, construction with vaults of 0.3 m3 each above the ground and a movable raised seat.
Area of use: Areas where people are motivated to handle and use humus or human excreta as a fertilizer and where no
water is used for anal cleansing.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Initially some absorbent organic material is put in the empty vault after each use and, whenever available, wood ash and
organic material are added. When urine is collected separately it is often diluted with 3–6 parts of water and utilized as
fertilizer. This may cause a health hazard and should be avoided. Adding lime or ash may help, but there is no guarantee
that the urine will then be safe. Water used for cleaning should not be allowed to go into the latrine as it will make the
contents too wet.
Maintenance
When the vault is three-quarters full, the contents are levelled with a stick, after which dry powdered earth is added till the
vault is full. The squat hole is then sealed and the other vault emptied with a spade and bucket, after which it is ready for
use. The removed contents can be used safely as a fertilizer. Householders may grow insect-repelling plants like
citronella around the latrine.
Organizational aspects
Extensive investigation among potential users is needed to find out if the system is culturally acceptable and if they are
motivated and capable of operating and maintaining the system properly. Prolonged support by the agency is needed to
ensure that users understand the system and operate it properly.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
96
c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Clean toilet and super
structure, empty urine
collection pot
Daily
Household
Water, lime, ashes
Brush, water
container
Add ashes or other
organic material
After each
defecation and
whenever
available
Household
Wood ashes and organic
material,
Pot to contain the
material, small
shovel
Inspect floor, superstructure and vaults
Monthly
Household
Repair floor, superstructure or vaults
When
necessary
Household or
local
Cement, sand, water, nails, Bucket or bowl,
local building materials
trowel, saw,
hammer, knife
Close full vault after
Depending on
Household or
levelling and adding soil,
size and number local pit emptier
empty other vault, open
of users
its squat hole and add
absorbent organic material
before starting to use, store
humus (or use directly)
Water, absorbent organic
material
Shovel and bucket
Use humus as
fertilizer
Humus
Shovel, bucket,
wheelbarrow
When needed
Household or
other users
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User, householder
Use latrine, remove urine, keep clean, inspect and perform
small repairs, empty pit and switch
Understanding of hygiene,
understanding of system
and its O&M
Local mason
Build and repair latrines
Basic masonry, latrine
building skills
Local pit emptier
Empty pit and switch, check system and perform
small repairs
Understanding of hygiene,
understanding of system
and its O&M
External support
organization
Investigate applicability, monitor users’ O&M and hygienic
behaviour and provide feedback, train users and local
artisans
Research and surveying
skills, training skills, knowledge
of the system, organizational
skills, communicative skills
e. Recurrent costs
When the system is well designed and constructed and O&M is done properly, the recurrent costs will be limited to the
costs of small repairs and emptying of a vault when full. Sometimes the humus can be sold to farmers.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Proper operation needs full understanding of the concept. This is often lacking and, as a result,
the contents are left too wet, making the vault malodorous and difficult to empty. Where people are eager to use the
contents as fertilizer, they may not allow sufficient time for the excreta to become pathogen-free.
Limitations. Only to be used where people are motivated to use human excreta as a fertilizer. The system is not
appropriate where water is used for anal cleansing.
Remarks. Double-vault latrines have been successfully used in Vietnam and Central America (Guatemala, Honduras,
Nicaragua, El Salvador). When tried elsewhere they have usually been unsatisfactory.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
97
O&M FACT SHEET
Septic tank and aqua-privy
a. Brief description of technology
Septic tanks and aqua-privies have a water-tight settling tank with one or two compartments, to which waste is carried by
water flushing down a pipe connected to the toilet. If there is a tank immediately under the latrine, excreta drop directly
into the tank through a pipe submerged in the liquid layer (aqua-privy). If the tank is located away from the latrine (septic
tank) the toilet usually has a U-trap. The systems do not dispose of wastes; they only help to separate the solid matter
from the liquid. Some of the solids float on the surface, where they are known as scum, while others sink to the bottom
where they are broken down by bacteria to form a deposit called sludge. The liquid effluent flowing out of the tank is,
from a health point of view, as dangerous as raw sewage and remains to be disposed of, normally by soaking into the
ground through a soakaway or with a connection to small-bore sewers. The sludge accumulating in the tank must be
removed regularly, usually once every 1–5 years, depending on size, number of users and kind of use. When sullage
disposal is also in the tank, a larger capacity is required for both the tank and the liquid effluent disposal system.
Connection to small-bore sewers may then be needed. Where high groundwater tables or rocky or impermeable
undergrounds occur, this may also be the case. Every tank must have a ventilation system to allow escape of explosive
methane and malodorous gases (generated when bacteria decompose some of the sewage constituents) from the tank.
Septic tanks are more expensive than other on-site sanitation systems and require sufficient piped water. Aqua-privies
are slightly less expensive and need less water for flushing.
Initial cost: US$ 90–375, including cost of labour and materials
Area of use: Rural or peri-urban areas where water is available.
Amount of water needed per toilet flushing: About 2 to 5 litres if a pour-flush pan or aqua-privy system is used.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Regular cleaning of the toilet with soap in normal amounts is unlikely to be harmful, but the use of large amounts of
detergents or chemicals may disturb the biochemical process in a tank. In aqua-privies the amount of liquid in the tank
should be kept high enough to keep the bottom of the drop pipe at least 75 mm below the liquid level. A bucket of water
should be poured down the drop pipe daily in order to clear scum (in which flies may breed) from the bottom of the drop
pipe and to maintain the water seal. When starting with a new tank, adding some sludge from another tank will ensure the
presence of micro-organisms so that the anaerobic digestion process can start directly and more completely.
Maintenance
Routine inspection is necessary to check whether desludging is needed and to ensure that there are no blockages at the
inlet or outlet. The tank should be emptied when solids occupy between one-half and two-thirds of the total depth
between the water level and the bottom of the tank.
Organizational aspects
Organizational aspects revolve around the reliability of the emptying services, the availability of skilled contractors for
construction and repair, and the control of sludge disposal.
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c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Clean squatting pan
or seat and shelter
Daily
Household
Water
Brush, water
container
Unblock U-trap
when blocked
Occasionally
Household
Water
Flexible brush or
other flexible material
Inspect if entry pipe
is still submerged
(for aqua-privies)
Regularly
Household
Water
Stick
Inspect floor,
squatting pan or
seat and U-trap
Monthly
Household
Repair squatting
pan or seat, U-trap
or shelter
Occasionally
Household or
local artisan
Cement, sand, water, nails,
local building materials
Bucket or bowl,
trowel, saw,
hammer, knife
Control vents
Annually
Household
Rope or wire, screen
material, pipe parts
Scissors or wirecutting tool, pliers,
saw
Empty tank
Every 1–5
years
Service crew
Water, fuel, lubricants, etc.
Vacuum tanker (large
or mini) or MAPET
equipment, if possible
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
User
Flush, keep clean, inspect vents, keep record of emptying
dates, control contents in tank and contact municipality or
other organization for emptying when necessary
Understanding of hygiene,
basic bookkeeping,
measuring skills
Sanitation service
Empty tank, control tank and vents, repair if needed
Skills to work with vacuum
tanker or MAPET, basic masonry
Agency
Monitor tank performance, and tank emptying by emptying
teams, train emptying teams
Training skills, monitoring
skills, organizational skills
and technical knowledge
e. Recurrent costs
The main cost involved is the emptying of the tank. The frequency of emptying depends on the amount of solids and
liquids entering into the tank. The average annual O&M cost per capita measured over 39 countries was US$ 3.09, while
in Brazil this cost was only US$ 0.67 (World Bank studies, quoted in Wilson H., 1988 (in 1987 US$).
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Many problems are due to inadequate consideration being given to liquid effluent disposal. Large
surges of flow entering the tank may cause a temporarily high concentration of suspended solids in the effluent owing to
disturbance of the solids which have already settled out. Leaking tanks may cause insect and odour problems in aquaprivies because the water seal is not maintained.
Limitations. Unsuitable for areas where water is scarce, where financial resources are insufficient for construction of
the system, or where safe tank emptying cannot be done or afforded. Where not enough space is available for soakaways
or drainage fields, small-bore sewers will have to be installed. Aqua-privies only function properly when they are very well
designed and constructed and operated.
Remarks. Septic tank additives—such as yeast, bacteria, and enzymes—which are often sold for “digesting scum and
sludge” and “avoiding expensive pumping” have not proved to be effective.
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O&M FACT SHEET
Drainage field
a. Brief description of technology
Drainage fields consist of gravel-filled underground trenches called leachlines or drainage trenches, into which the liquid
effluents coming from a septic tank are led through open-jointed (stoneware) or perforated (PVC) pipes, allowing the
effluents to infiltrate into the ground. Initially the infiltration into the ground may be high, but after several years the soil
clogs and an equilibrium infiltration rate is reached. If the sewage flow exceeds the equilibrium rate of the soil, eventually
the sewage will surface over the drainage field..
Trenches are usually 0.3–0.5 m wide with a depth of 0.6–1.0 m below the top of the pipes. They are laid with a 0.2–0.3%
gradient and contain 20–50 mm diameter gravel with 0.3–0.5 m of soil on top, with a barrier of straw or plastic sheets
to prevent soil from washing down. They should be laid in series so that as each trench fills, it overflows to the next one.
This ensures that each trench is used either fully or not at all. Trenches should be 2 m apart, or twice the trench depth
if this is greater than 1 m. The bottom of a trench should be at least 0.5–1 m above groundwater, bedrock or impermeable soil, and land slope should not exceed 10%. An equal area of land should be kept in reserve for possible extension
or replacement of the drain field if it becomes clogged.
Compared to soakaways, drainage fields are often used where larger quantities of liquid effluents are produced.
Initial cost: No data found.
Area of use: Rural or peri-urban areas where sufficient water and space are available and the soil is permeable.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
Hardly any activities for operation are required, except observing if there are overflows and switching to a second
drainage field every 6 to 12 months and fixing the dates of switching (if applicable).
Maintenance
Clean the tank outflow and check if it is still in order (if not, it should be cleaned or repaired). Deblocking of the delivery
pipe may be necessary occasionally. Diversion boxes have to be cleaned from time to time. Control plant growth to
prevent the roots from entering the pipes or trenches.
Organizational aspects
Minor O&M and bookkeeping are organized and executed by households, groups of households or a community organization. The government department needs to monitor the performance of drainage fields and train users (and their
organizations), artisans and caretakers on the technical aspects of O&M.
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c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Tools and
equipment
Control plant growth Regularly
Household or
caretaker
Shovel, bucket,
panga, etc.
Switch to other
drainage field
Once every
6–12
months
Household or
caretaker
Bricks or other material
to block pipes
Tools to open
diversion box
Deblock delivery
pipe
Occasionally
Household,
caretaker or
local artisan
Water, piece of pipe, glue
Brush, shovel, long
stick or flexible brush,
knife, saw
Clean diversion
boxes
Every month
Household or
caretaker
Water
Shovel, brush
Check outflow of
tank and clean
Once a month
Household or
caretaker
Water
Brush, tools to open
access hole
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
Household user or
local caretaker
Check outflow tank and performance of drainage field and
control plant growth
Understanding of hygiene,
some technical knowledge
of tank and field
Local artisan
Repair parts if broken, remove obstructions in delivery pipes
Basic masonry, piping
techniques, knowledge of
system techniques and
functioning
Agency
Monitor performance of systems, train users, caretakers and Training skills, technical
local artisans, provide assistance with big problems
skills for repair and
maintenance of drainage
fields, monitoring skills
e. Recurrent costs
If the system is well designed, repairs are needed only very occasionally and the recurrent costs are therefore low.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Overflowing leachlines, unpleasant odour, groundwater contamination, and social conflict (over
siting of the drainage fields, odour, etc.).
Limitations. Unsuitable where the available space, water or financial resources for construction are insufficient, where
the permeability of the soil is poor, or where bedrock or groundwater are at a shallow depth.
Remarks. Pressure can be taken off drainage fields by reducing the amount of water and solids flowing into the solids
interceptor tank, e.g. by improved design of toilets which use less water or by preventing sullage from entering the tank.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
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O&M FACT SHEET
Small-bore or settled sewerage
a. Brief description of technology
Small-bore sewerage (or settled sewerage) is a sewerage system that is designed to receive only the liquid fraction of
household wastewater. The solid components of the waste, which settle, are kept in an interceptor tank (basically a
single-compartment septic tank) which needs periodic desludging. Because the sewers only receive the liquid sewage,
they are designed differently from conventional sewers and have the following advantages:
■ the system needs less water because solids are not transported;
■ excavation costs are reduced because the pipes can be laid at shallow depths and do not need to maintain selfcleansing velocity;
■ material costs are reduced because the diameter of the pipes can be small (peak flow is attenuated by the interceptor
tanks) and there is no need for large manholes;
■ treatment requirements are reduced because the solids are kept in the interceptor tanks.
The small-bore sewer system consists of a house connection, an interceptor tank, sewers, cleanouts/manholes, vents,
sewage treatment plant, and lift stations (if there is no gravity flow). The system is most appropriate in areas that already
have septic tanks but where the soil cannot (or can no longer) absorb the effluent or where densities are such that there
is no room for soakaways. It also provides an economical way to upgrade existing sanitation facilities to a level more
comparable to conventional sewers.
Initial cost: No recent data available, but the cost of the system in Brotas (Brazil) was calculated to be 78% cheaper
than conventional sewerage; in Australia and the USA there were 25–35% savings on the construction cost, but
this excluded the cost of the interceptor tanks.
Area of use: Areas where individual soakaways are not appropriate (soil conditions or densities), or areas where pourflush latrines with soakpits can be upgraded to a small-bore sewer system.
b. Description of O&M activities
Operation
The main operational requirement is for the household to ensure that no solids can enter the system and that the
interceptor tank functions properly.
Maintenance
Regular removal of the sludge in the interceptor tank. This has to be checked by the local sewerage authority because
the system will be at risk if solids can enter. Also, removal of blockages, regular control of sewage pipes, and periodic
flushing. The performance of accessories in the pipeline system such as cleanouts, manholes, (possible) lift stations,
and ventilation points should be regularly checked and maintained.
Organizational aspects
These are mainly the organization of desludging services for the interceptor tanks. The principal problems related to
desludging revolve around responsibility. Normally this lies with the property owners since the interceptor tank is on their
property. Residents who are not owners have no incentive to desludge regularly. Desludging costs money and is inconvenient; sludge overflowing in the sewerage system will not directly affect the resident but will affect the communal
sewer system downstream. If the sewer system is to work effectively, the responsibility for tank desludging must fall on
the organization which is responsible for maintenance of communal sewers. This organization must therefore bear the
responsibility for treatment of the liquid from the sewers and the sludge from the interceptor tanks.
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c. O&M requirements
Activity
Frequency
Human
resources
Materials and
spare parts
Clean grease trap
Daily/weekly
Household
Water
Repairs and removal When needed
of blockages
Local workers or
mechanic
Water, specialized materials
and spare parts
Rodding tool,
mechanic’s tool set
Check inspection
At least annually
chambers,
appurtenances such
as pumps and
controls, vacuum
and surge chambers,
check valves
Household or
mechanic
Water
Basic tool set
Inspect street
sewers
Staff sewerage
department
Specialized spare parts
and materials
Specialized tools and
equipment
Regularly
Tools and
equipment
d. Actors implied and skills required in O&M
Actor
Role
Skills
Householder
Check appurtenances within plot, assist community
organization in maintenance of inspection chambers and
common block sewer line
Understanding of system,
some technical skills to
check appurtenances
Local workers/
mechanic
Check on-site appurtenances, perform small repairs,
removal of blocks
Mechanical skills
Community
organization
Organize regular checking of block sewer, notify agency of
problems that cannot be solved, collect sewer charges
Understanding of system and
bookkeeping skills, organizational skills, monitoring skills,
communicative skills
Agency
Monitor system’s performance; keep regular contacts with
community organizations and monitor their performance;
train teams, mechanics, organization staff and community
organization members, operate and maintain collector
sewer, pumping station and treatment plant
Technical skills, administrative
skills, organizational skills,
monitoring skills,
communicative skills,
training skills
e. Recurrent costs
The main recurrent cost is the emptying of the interceptor tanks, which varies by country and city. Other recurrent costs
are for occasional flushing of the system, and repairs to maintain the system.
f. Problems, limitations and remarks
Frequent problems. Overflowing interceptor tanks because they have not been desludged in time. Blockages due to
illegal connections bypassing the interceptor tank.
Limitations. Basically only suitable where septic tanks or other on-site systems are already in existence. If a new system
needs to be installed, the shallow sewer system is more appropriate as it does not need an interceptor tank. The need
for regular desludging of the interceptor tank calls for a well-organized sewerage department.
Remarks. The small-bore sewerage system needs a regular lay-out along back lanes or streets and a regular (even if
limited) water supply system. These are absent in many low-income urban areas so that this system is not appropriate.
So far, positive experiences with the system have all been in developed countries.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
103
4.3 Spare parts provision in general
Instead of being one of the principal items on a check-list for sustainability, spare parts
are often considered long after the technical and operational designs of a water supply
or sanitation project have been decided. Spare parts provision should therefore be one
of the deciding factors in technology selection, and not merely an unplanned consequence.
Spare parts can be defined as all the materials and items needed for the efficient and
sustainable operation and maintenance of a water supply or sanitation system. They
include:
■ Mechanical, hydraulic, electrical and electronic parts
■ Tools
■ Seals and washers
■ Fuel, lubricants
■ Paint
■ Chemicals and other consumables
■ Parts for essential transport and communication equipment
■ Stationery
4.4 Towards sustainable spare parts provision
Spare parts provision should be viewed as much from the demand side as from the
supply side. Furthermore, sustainable spare parts provision depends also on strategic
issues.
Such elements as the need for spare parts, their cost, and accessibility to spare parts
are likely to influence the demand for spare parts. The following items should be considered in analysing this demand.
Need for spare parts
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Assessment of the spare parts needed for a particular technical option, based on
the technical characteristics and experience;
Identification and inventory of the spare parts required, based on an accurate
diagnosis of the problems most likely to occur, and their periodicity;
Estimate of the spare parts needed for emergency repairs, accidents, or scheduled
replacement;
Variations in the frequency of this need, which communities should be aware of;
Determination of proper timing for initiating repairs or replacement, in addition
to the activities needed for simple maintenance of the system;
Proper operation and maintenance, including effective preventive maintenance,
in order to decrease the need for spare parts and their frequency;
Interchangeability of some spare parts with other brands or technologies.
Cost of spare parts
■
■
■
■
■
Can the cost of spare parts be met according to the tariff in place?
Are the transport costs to obtain the spare parts included in the tariff? If not, how
may these be met?
What financial mechanisms are available in case the budget cannot cover the cost
of spare parts?
How does the cost of imported spare parts compare with similar parts produced
locally or in neighbouring countries?
How significant are exchange rate fluctuations on the cost of spare parts?
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Accessibility to spare parts
■
■
The distance between the village and the location of the shop which is selling the
spare parts could be a factor influencing the demand for spare parts;
This demand can be divided into three categories: 1) frequently needed spare parts,
for which the sales outlet or mechanic should be in the village or as close as possible to it; 2) occasionally needed spare parts (every six months to a year), for which the
distance should not be too far; 3) spare parts for major repairs or replacement, which
may be ordered only from the regional or state capital.
Factors likely to have an influence on the supply side are the availability and use of
local materials and locally manufactured parts, location of marketing and sales points,
and the profit perspective. The following items should be reviewed.
Use of local materials and locally manufactured parts
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Making better use of materials from sustainable local sources;
Having options for recycling and re-use or restoration of worn-out parts;
Improving the reliability of the products (quality control) and the guarantees;
Improving compliance with delivery deadlines through bonuses or other mechanisms, including penalties for delay;
Encouraging local entrepreneurs or cooperatives to undertake the manufacture of
spare parts;
Making sure that the parts are guaranteed to remain available over a period of
time;
Learning from the experience of local manufacturers in other sectors;
Balancing the proportion of imported spare parts with those manufactured locally;
Offering incentives to local entrepreneurs (e.g. tax breaks, subsidies, preferential
consideration against foreign suppliers, etc.).
Quality of spare parts
■
■
■
Type of material used;
Quality of manufacture, quality control;
Interchangeability.
Marketing and sales points
■
■
■
■
■
Encouraging local entrepreneurs, mechanics and shops to undertake the distribution and supply of spare parts, making them aware of the market potential and of
the three categories of spare parts, as described above under “accessibility”;
Installing, where possible, a revolving fund for spare parts which is managed by a
cooperative of users or mechanics;
Making sure that the provision of spare parts through donor assistance or government channels is only temporary, and promoting the development of the private
sector;
Creating better links between the supplier and the user;
Ensuring stock control, warehousing and sustainable outlet options.
Perspective on profits
■
Involving local manufacturers, entrepreneurs, mechanics and shops by offering
them some kind of benefits or profit (e.g. a defined profit margin, percentage of
sales as own income, free stock for first sales, etc.);
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
105
■
Making sure that donor-assisted or heavily subsidized prices do not “kill” the
market, which means that market prices should be realistic right from the start in
order to keep the system sustainable.
Strategic issues for improving spare parts provision include efficient planning, whether
to standardize or not, approaches to reducing the need for spare parts, appropriate
pricing policy, private sector involvement, and capacity-building.
Efficient planning
■
■
■
■
Planning for spare parts provision should start as early as possible in the project
cycle.
During a feasibility study, the project should assess the following: types of spare
parts currently available locally or in neighbouring countries; the distribution network; type of equipment used in other projects and regions; the possibility of interchangeability; the possibility of local manufacture (in steel works and plastic works);
the cost of spare parts to the customer; the level of import taxes; and national
policy regarding spare parts provision.
Implementation of the project should ensure the sustainability of spare parts provision on a long-term basis.
After the construction phase, regular monitoring and evaluation of the equipment
will help to determine the right time for repairs and rehabilitation within the economic life-span of the scheme; feed-back to the manufacturers on any weakness in
the manufacturing of the equipment can help them.
Whether to standardize
Several countries have chosen to standardize their choice of technology. There are positive as well as negative aspects which should be carefully considered (see Table below)
before making a decision. Whatever the choice, it could be for a certain number of years
only.
FOR STANDARDIZATION
■ Wide use of the same item of equipment
encourages agents and shopkeepers to store and
supply these spare parts because of the
“guaranteed demand”
■ Proliferation of brands and technology makes
it difficult to organize spare parts availability
■ Prices and markets can be more easily researched
■ Users become familiar with one type of product
or technology
■ Training of personnel can be standardized.
AGAINST STANDARDIZATION
■ The chosen technology does not respond totally
to the needs and preference of the users
■ The market is closed for new, innovative and
cheaper technologies
■ Poor incentive for involvement of the private and
research sectors
■ Possible conflict with donor policies on technology
choice
■ Competition between different brands can bring
down prices and lead to improvements.
Approaches to reducing the need for spare parts
■
■
■
■
Better design of equipment to make them last longer.
Better engineering to reduce operation and maintenance requirements.
Better use and operation, by instructing the users on how to reduce wear and tear
in the equipment.
Introduction of a maintenance “culture” that promotes prevention rather than
cure.
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Appropriate pricing policy
■
■
■
■
■
■
At the outset, donor assistance often includes subsidized prices for spare parts,
which can have a negative effect later on. While this type of pricing by donors may
be an incentive to local distributors initially, it raises false expectations and does
not help to stabilize the market.
Highly subsidized prices may not be sustainable over a long period.
Pricing policy could include an agreed margin of benefits for the intermediaries
up to the final outlet point, with prices which the users can afford and are willing
to pay.
Free price policies could open up the market for spare parts and their distribution,
but will result in higher prices for consumers initially; however, competition
between various brands could lead to a fall in prices.
High taxes on imported foreign equipment for water supply could be reduced.
Appropriate pricing of spare parts should be one of the key elements in the technology selection process.
Private sector involvement
■
■
■
■
■
■
Is there a policy towards private sector incentives and promotion?
Are there manufacturers of spare parts in other sectors, from whom lessons can be
learnt and with whom resources and experiences can be shared?
What are the opportunities for interregional cooperation in terms of shared
markets, marketing, agreements on prices, or division of specialization?
What are the possibilities for joint ventures with firms and manufacturers in developed countries, which will provide technical, entrepreneurial and managerial training?
Can the links between manufacturers be strengthened?
How can the informal private sector at local level contribute to the manufacture
and provision of spare parts?
Capacity-building
■
■
Assessment of training needs in the private sector for stock management, as well as
manufacture, distribution, supply and use of spare parts.
Opportunities for learning from the experiences in neighbouring countries and
from partners.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
107
Unit 2: Analysis of participation
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To identify all the actors involved in the operation, maintenance and management of
rural water supply and sanitation systems
■ To identify their roles, interest, problems and degree of participation
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Interactive group exercise
3. Concluding remark
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
➽ Handouts
✔ Background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
The object of operation and maintenance is to deal with people and institutions on technical issues. This session aims to identify all the actors who are directly and indirectly
involved in the operation and maintenance of water systems, their roles and interests
(interests can be contradictory or complementary between different actors), and their
major problems.
The work in this session and the next will involve the whole group. Different seating
arrangements should be made, because the participants will not have to take down notes
or carry out any special exercises. Tables are not required, and the chairs should be
placed in a semi-circle facing a wall. The results of the two sessions, when completed,
should be distributed to the participants.
Analysis by participation is an integral part of the OOPP (Objective Oriented Project
Planning) analytical method. A full explanation of the methodology is given in the supporting material below. Some elements have been adapted especially for this course.
Before the session, the facilitator puts up sheets of paper (craft paper or flip chart
sheets) on the wall and draws the framework of a Table for the participation analysis (see
page 109). Participants will only need their marker pens.
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Group exercise on analysis of participation
Once the framework has been explained, the facilitator will proceed in three steps:
Step 1: Ask the group what actors are involved in the operation, maintenance and
management of rural water supply and sanitation systems. The analysis can be carried
out for either water supply or sanitation services, or both. The choice depends on the
previously identified demand and needs of the group. All contributions are made on
cards, on which the name of an actor is written down, and these are placed within the
Table on the wall. The participants may assist the facilitator in writing down the names of
the actors. Some of the cards can be grouped if necessary.
Step 2: The group is asked to give the main roles of each major actor and follows the
same procedure as in Step 1. See background information (below) for further details.
Step 3: The participants are divided into groups corresponding to the major groups
of actors (national level, provincial/district level, local level, etc.) that have been identified. They then describe the interests and problems of each group. All the results are
written down on the cards which are placed within the Table. Each group then presents
its cards and explains the meaning behind each one. Some rules about how to write the
statements on the cards are given below:
Rule 1:
CARDS SHOULD BE WRITTEN
WITH CAPITAL LETTERS
Rule 2:
CARDS SHOULD BE WRITTEN
IN A LEGIBLE WAY
Rule 3:
CARDS SHOULD DESCRIBE
ONLY ONE IDEA
Rule 4:
CARDS SHOULD HAVE
NOT MORE
THAN THREE LINES
The next session will describe how to present the statement of problems in an appropriate way. The facilitator should accept the statements given on the cards; however, if
their formulation should be unclear, he could ask for clarification or reformulation.
Concluding remark
The facilitator goes over the whole Table, highlighting the main roles, interests and problems that have arisen. The last column (“Present degree of involvement”) can be filled in
at the same time, following discussions with the group.
The facilitator will point out that this analysis has shown that O&M is concerned with
a large number of actors and that it is important to see how all of them can cooperate in
an optimal and effective way. The initial identification of problems is the starting point
for the next session, which deals with the analysis of constraints.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
109
3. Overhead sheets
There are no overhead sheets because the Table for the analysis of participation should
be prepared on a large sheet of paper which is put up on a wall. For details, see below.
4. Background information
An analysis of participation can rapidly show that various actors are involved in the
operation and maintenance of rural water supply and sanitation systems. The analysis
consists in listing all the actors involved at various levels, highlighting their roles in
operation, maintenance and management, their interests, the main constraints each
actor is facing, and their degree of involvement, as shown in the Table below.
Actors/group
Role in O&M
of actors
Interest
Problems
Degree of
involvement*
Present
Future
National level
Provincial/district
level
Local and community
level
* Three degrees: 1, little involvement; 2, medium involvement; 3, major involvement. Future involvement should be filled in after the
decentralization policies have been reviewed.
Roles usually include policy-making for maintenance; sector planning and programming for maintenance; coordination; budget allocations; follow-up and monitoring;
normative control; regulation; training; technical assistance; tariff setting; payment of
services; day-to-day operation of the system; preventive maintenance; small repairs;
major repairs; rehabilitation; manufacture of spare parts; provision of spare parts.
This analysis can be summarized in the Table below, which gives an overview of the
degree of involvement of the major actors in the operation and maintenance of water
supply and sanitation systems.
Degree of involvement
Major actors
Little
Medium
Major
National institutions
Provincial institutions
Local authorities
Community organizations
Users
Private sector and NGOs
External support agencies
The above analysis can also be done in a more detailed way by analysing the degree of
involvement of each actor for each role, as identified in the first Table.
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Unit 3: Analysis of constraints
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To further identify problems linked to O&M
■ To analyse these problems in a logical way
■ To draw a problem tree
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Focused discussion
3. Interactive group exercise
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Large sheet of paper (craft paper), hung on the wall for the problem tree exercise
✔ Cards of various colours (code is important: for example, yellow for problems)
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of transparencies, background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
The present session is directly linked to the previous one. The OOPP (Objective
Oriented Project Planning) methodology will now be introduced for application in this
course (see below, background information and overhead sheets). This adaptation of
the original methodology provides a flexible management and analytical tool. The
session deals with problem analysis in the context of operation and maintenance of
water supply and sanitation systems; other activities will be developed later in the course.
It should be noted that the full use of the methodology is not essential, especially in a
training session to work on a situation analysis. OOPP is not an end in itself, it is just a
tool.
Focused discussion
Before starting with the OOPP methodology, the participants will be asked to indicate
the planning tools which are being used in their professional setting. This list of tools will
be written on the board by the facilitator, who will ask for comments from the participants.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
111
Interactive group exercise
The group should have the same informal seating arrangements as in the last session.
The facilitator will proceed in the following way:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Problems which are linked to operation and maintenance of water supply and sanitation systems are formulated. For this exercise, a large group can be divided into
smaller subgroups, who will have to prioritize the problems and produce a maximum of seven cards; some of these problems could come from the analysis in the
previous session, with others added.
All the subgroups should clearly understand each problem; the facilitator may have
to rewrite some of the cards.
All the identified problems are put up on one side of the sheet on the wall in order
to leave enough space for the actual analysis.
The analysis starts by asking the participants which of the problems could be direct
causes of the main problem for “poor O&M”, until all the problems have been
examined and linked to form a tree.
The analysis also examines the effects of poor O&M; if some problems have not
been highlighted, the group can do so now.
The whole logic of the tree can be checked in terms of cause-effect relationships.
At the end of the analysis, lines should be drawn linking the cards in order to
visualize the relationship between problems, thereby building an objective tree.
This session is highly participatory and the facilitator should be careful to keep good
track of the time. The aim is not unanimous agreement on a hypothetical situation, but
an acceptable compromise by the group. At this stage, the object is to examine the main
problems in order to see how they are interrelated. The participants will have the opportunity to develop this in more detail during their individual assignments later in the
course.
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3. Overhead sheets: Sheet 1
OOPP
Objective Oriented Project Planning
1. Analytical phase
2. Planning phase
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
113
Overhead sheet 2
1. Analytical phase
a.
b.
c.
d.
Analysis of participation
Analysis of problems
Analysis of objectives
Analysis of alternatives
2. Planning phase
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Development of planning matrix
Identification of assumptions
Identification of activities
Formulation of indicators
Estimation of costs and human
resources needs
f. Time planning
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Overhead sheet 3
Problem analysis
1 Identification and formulation of problems
2 Selection of an “essential” problem
3 Identification of the direct causes of this problem
4 Identification of the direct effects of this problem
5 Continuation of the identification of cause-effect
relationships
6 Control of global coherence
7 Drawing of lines to create a problem tree
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
115
Overhead sheet 4
Cause-effect relationships
Repairs are delayed
Community funds are low
Direct effects
Insufficient financial
resources
Direct causes
People
do not pay
Tariff calculation does
not cover all costs
Poor financial
support
Same process
Same process
Same process
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4. Background information
4.1 The importance of problem analysis
One of the first tasks for a manager or a group of persons is to understand and assess the
present situation. There are many different ways to go about this—reading reports and
studies which have been written on a particular project; holding a series of interviews
and meetings, and asking staff about their perceptions on the situation; making field
visits in order to visualize the situation; deciding to analyse successes and focus on them
only.
Experience has shown that good plans are based on an appropriate understanding of
a situation, which is based not only on an analysis of successes, but also of constraints and
problems. However, many managers will limit themselves only to the identification of
problems, and omit their analysis. Furthermore, there are often as many interpretations
of a problem as there are professionals.
Without denying the positive aspects of other working methodologies, this methodology proposes to assess a situation on the basis of a common understanding of the problems. It is simple, participatory, democratic and motivating. It allows a group of
professionals at different levels, from different departments or sectors, to reach consensus on the situation, which is vital for the effective implementation of a plan. The logical
sequential analysis shows that problems are interrelated and cannot be isolated.
4.2 What is a problem?
According to the Collins Cobuild English Language Dictionary, a problem is a situation or
a state of affairs that causes difficulties for people, so that they try to think of a way to deal with it.
People do not always have the same perceptions and vision of a problem, since they
belong to different cultures and have different priorities in their working or living environments. However, the above definition helps to focus our vision on what is a problem.
It causes difficulties for people, so that they try to think of a way to deal with it. A problem is
based on a real, existing situation, which becomes troublesome in a way that one has to
react to it. Therefore, a problem is not an interpretation of a situation, it is a fact, a
reality. Furthermore, it is significant enough that people do want to react to it, thus
avoiding minor troubles which life is usually filled with anyway.
Many people will identify a problem in terms of a desired situation which they do not
have, visualizing a problem as an absent solution. For example, some will say that “no
equipment”, “no vehicle” or “no money” are problems while analysing a situation of long
delays for repairs. This could be hiding the fact that there is poor planning, that villages
are far away, that tools and equipment are obsolete, that the project is understaffed, that
spare parts are not available, etc. However, lack of equipment or poor budget allocations
could also be a reality.
In this course, we will consider problems with a negative formulation, since this helps
to raise an issue, a challenge to be met. A formulation just stating “spare parts” does not
raise an issue, and does not say what is wrong, although spare parts can be a problem.
This could be formulated as “poor availability of spare parts”, or “high cost of spare
parts”, etc., depending the situation.
In summary, we will define a problem as :
1.
2.
3.
4.
A real, existing situation
Significant
Preferably not an absent solution
A negative formulation
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
117
4.3 The OOPP methodology
This methodology was first developed in 1983 by the German Organization for Development Cooperation (GTZ). It combines the logical framework tool with new communication techniques (Metaplan) into an analytical and planning tool called Objective Oriented
Project Planning (OOPP, or ZOPP in German). This is now being used as a major planning tool by the great majority of agencies involved in development cooperation. Other
planning tools are also proposed in this course.
OOPP is based on a logical sequence of reflection, and the team work approach is its
essential feature. It uses a strong visualization tool, i.e. cards, in order to see what would
otherwise be abstract. The result of the thinking process is accepted by the group. The
analytical method is based on the analysis of a logical sequence of cause-effect relationships between various problems as will be exposed later.
OOPP is composed of two phases: an analytical phase and a planning phase.
The analytical phase comprises participation analysis, problem analysis, objective analysis, and an analysis of alternatives.
The planning phase consists in the development of a planning matrix, determination
of assumptions and conditions, determination of activities, formulation of indicators,
estimation of financial and human resources needed, and the development of a
chronogram (for timing of activities).
What are the advantages of the methodology?
■
■
■
■
■
■
Reaches a common understanding of problems
Clarifies cause-effect relationships
Provides clear planning documents
Allows the participation of various staff and professionals, as well as beneficiaries of
the project
Establishes a consensus
Easier to implement because of broad acceptance.
What are the limitations of the methodology?
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Truth is not only rational and logical; the methodology puts aside all intuition,
contradictions and feelings.
Can lead to a simplified “linear” representation of reality.
The whole planning depends on an adequate and accurate problem analysis.
Creative thinking only done for the problem analysis, but gets lost in the mechanical sequences afterwards.
The emphasis on problems can put a shadow on the perception of existing potentials
and successes.
Certain groups are not familiar with an abstract and logical analytical sequence of
thinking, which can create problems in its application.
Needs a good and experienced facilitator.
4.4 How to analyse problems
After the problems have been identified and listed by all the participants, the group is
asked to select one problem as essential, which will be used to start the analysis. Criteria
of selection can be: most pressing problem, or most frequently occurring problem. As an
example for illustration, we have chosen the problem of “insufficient financial resources”.
From the listed problems, the group then identifies those that are the main causes for
this essential problem, and are directly linked to it. It is possible to formulate additional
problems if they are not all present yet. It is also possible to reformulate some cards,
which appear to be too vague. It is also possible to eliminate cards that appear to be
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
118
totally out of context. The question to be asked in order to find the direct causes, is
WHY?
In a second step, it is now proposed to select from among the list of identified problems, those that can be the effects of the essential problem, and are directly linked to it.
Problems can be added, or eliminated as shown above. The question to be asked in order
to find the direct effects, is WHAT are the direct consequences of this essential problem?
What will it lead to? This process is then repeated for each cause. What are the causes of
this problem? Same applies for the effects, until all the cards have been placed. Lines are
then drawn showing the relationship between each card. The final result is a problem
tree. There is no perfect problem tree. All problem trees are different, since all groups
are different. It just represents the consensus and understanding of a particular situation
for a given group, at a given time, in a given context.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
119
Unit 4: Analysis of objectives
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To identify objectives linked to O&M
■ To analyse these objectives in a logical way
■ To draw a problem tree
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Interactive group exercise
3. Concluding remark
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Large sheet of paper (craft paper), hung on the wall for the problem tree exercise
✔ Cards of various colours (code is important: for example, green for problems)
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of transparencies and background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introduction
This session is the immediate follow-up of the problem analysis. It looks into the future
on the basis of an analysis of the present situation, the problem analysis.
Interactive group exercise
The group exercise is in two parts: 1) construction of the objective tree; 2) selection of a
strategy.
1) Using the problem tree, the facilitator asks the participants to restate the negatively formulated problems into objectives which are positive and achievable. Avoid statements of objectives with an ultimate or long-term improvement, but indicate, on the
basis of the problem analysis, an improved situation. For example, do not indicate the
problem of lack of funds as plenty of funds, but rather as improved financial situation,
etc.
It may be that some problems cannot be changed into objectives, because the project
will not be able to solve them, e.g. “corruption”. These cards in the exercise will remain
as problems, even in the objective tree.
It is important to use cards of two different colours for objectives and problems.
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120
The facilitator, with the help of the participants, can rebuild an objective tree, similar
to the structure of the problem tree. However, they will have to look at the means-end
relationship (as opposed to cause-effect for problems). It can very well be that the logic
is not always the same and that some analyses need to be examined again; also, other
objectives may have to be added in order to complete the analysis.
The end product is an objective tree, in which the facilitator can circle the various
entities that appear, such as “community”, “technical aspects”, “institutional support”,
etc.
2) The selection of a strategy consists in the selection of objectives. It would be impossible for a project to tackle all the objectives which are formulated in the objective tree,
mainly for the following reasons:
■
■
■
All the objectives are not within the mandate and responsibility of a project.
There are not enough financial and human resources to work on all objectives.
The project has to respond to some priority or urgent issues first.
The management and staff will therefore have to choose and prioritize in a participatory way. The selection process can be performed in the following way:
■
■
Identify those objectives which are not within the mandate and the responsibility
of the project (in this case, it might be difficult because the project is hypothetical).
Identify key objectives (maximum seven) which can greatly influence the main
objective, i.e. “Improved O&M”. These objectives should generate a maximum
impact for a minimum input of resources, which are limited; it could be that the
main objective is not completely resolved, but the chosen objectives will greatly
contribute to it.
Procedure. The facilitator asks the participants to form small groups of three
persons. Each group will have the task of identifying a maximum of seven objectives
which will contribute to the main objective. They will also have to give a priority to each
objective.
After the objectives have been chosen, the facilitator draws the following Table on the
board:
Selected objectives
Number of groups who
selected this objective
Priority given by the group
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
This Table, when filled in, will allow a participatory decision to be made on which
objectives to choose. The final selection will correspond to the objectives which obtained
the best score, taking into account the priority as well.
Conclusion
The project has now selected precise objectives to work on, which are based on an analysis of a real situation.
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
121
3. Overhead sheets: Sheet 1
How to do an objective tree
Step 1: Reformulate all negative conditions into
positive attainable conditions
Step 2: Check whether rewording has led to
unrealistic or ethically questionable
statements
Step 3: Examine the “means–ends” relationships,
thus derived to assure the validity and
completeness of the tree; add cards if
necessary
Step 4: Draw lines between all objectives showing
relationships and finalize the objective tree
Step 5: Circle different groups or entities which
appear within the objective tree and give
them a name
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Overhead sheet 2
Example of an objective tree
Community funds are
sufficient
Repairs are on time
Direct ends
Financial resources
improved
Direct means
Level of payments
improved
Tariff calculation does
cover all O&M costs
Cost-sharing
arrangements clarified
Same process
Same process
Same process
MODULE 2. SITUATION ANALYSIS
123
4. Background information
4.1 Discussion on alternatives: identifying potential alternative solutions
The chief criterion when evaluating and selecting alternatives is whether the project is
realistic and more beneficial than problematic. The following aspects can be significant:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Priorities in policy development
Specific conditions in the country
Suitability of the chosen project to the donor agency and the national departments
which support it
Availability of funding
Project’s experience in the region or sector
Available manpower
Complementary or competitive activities of other projects.
The choice between alternatives will be determined by cost-benefit analyses, additional analysis of various interest groups, and management discussions and decisions.
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
125
MODULE 3
Towards sustainable O&M
Unit 1: Linking technology choice with operation & maintenance
127
1. Outline of session
127
2. Notes for the facilitator
127
3. Exercise sheets
129
4. Background information
131
4.1 O&M specific criteria affecting water supply technology
choice
131
4.2 O&M specific criteria affecting sanitation technology selection 131
4.3 Technology selection process
132
4.4 The process of community water supply technology choice
133
4.5 The process of low-cost sanitation technology choice
134
Unit 2: Institutional set-up
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead and exercise sheets
Document analysis 1 to 4
4. Background information
4.1 Institutions are evolving
4.2 Changes in the approach
4.3 Summary of various management options
4.4 Issues affecting the choice of management models for the
operation and maintenance of rural water supply and
sanitation systems
4.5 The importance of communication
136
136
136
138
143
147
147
148
149
Unit 3: Community management
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheets
4. Background information
4.1 The concept of community management
4.2 Some findings from the field
4.3 “Revisiting” community management
4.4 Some concluding remarks about community
management
158
158
158
163
175
175
176
177
Unit 4: Gender awareness
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheets
180
180
180
182
150
156
178
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126
4. Background information
4.1 Definitions
4.2 Historical background
4.3 Elements for a gender analysis
4.4 Ways to overcome constraints to women’s participation
4.5 Gender and operation and maintenance
4.6 Gender and management
186
186
186
187
188
188
189
Unit 5: Cost recovery
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead and exercise sheets
4. Background information
4.1 Identifying the implications of the project and the
environment on cost recovery
4.2 Maximizing the willingness to pay (WTP)
4.3 Clarifying financial responsibilities
4.4 Optimizing operation and maintenance costs
4.5 Setting an appropriate and equitable tariff structure
4.6 Developing an effective financial management system
4.7 Organizing access to alternative financial sources
190
190
190
192
197
Unit 6: Monitoring for effectiveness
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead and exercise sheets
4. Background information
4.1 Monitoring in perspective
4.2 Definitions
4.3 Indicators
4.4 Examples of indicators
214
214
214
217
228
228
228
229
230
Unit 7: Working and planning with communities
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheets
4. Background information
4.1 In general
4.2 The Participatory Action Development (PAD) approach
4.3 Diagnosis
4.4 The process of community diagnosis
4.5 Tools—Fact sheets
234
234
234
236
243
243
243
244
245
246
Unit 8: Field visit
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Exercise sheets
4. Background information
4.1 Recording observations
4.2 Interviews
264
264
264
266
268
268
268
197
198
201
204
205
211
212
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
127
Unit 1: Linking technology choice with
Operation & Maintenance
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To raise awareness on operation and maintenance criteria that influence technology
choice
■ To become familiar with the processes that influence technology choice for community water supply and sanitation facilities
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Plenary discussion on criteria
3. Group exercise on technology selection process
4. Conclusion
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Flip chart and markers
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of transparencies
✔ Exercise sheet
✔ Extracts from background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
Module 3 deals with the main issues that influence effective operation and maintenance
of water supply and sanitation services, including technology choice. The latter is the
first determining factor for effective operation and maintenance. Indeed, the type of
technology and its selection are likely to have an impact on future operation and maintenance activities. This session highlights the criteria as well as processes that link technology choice with operation and maintenance.
Plenary discussion on criteria
The facilitator draws 10 columns on the board, five for water supply and five for sanitation, which correspond to the following sustainability factors: 1) technical aspects; 2)
community aspects; 3) environmental aspects; 4) institutional and legal aspects; 5) other
aspects. Past experience has shown that participants like to add financial factors to this
list, even though financial factors are implicit in all the other factors. The facilitator asks
the participants with respect to each column, “What are the important O&M criteria to
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128
consider during the planning stage?”, and writes down their answers. If needed, the
facilitator can add the information given below (see background information, page 131).
Group exercise on technology selection process
The facilitator divides the participants into two groups for 1) water supply technology
choice, and 2) sanitation technology choice. Each group receives a set of prepared cards
(A4 size, divided into three), describing typical activities involved in the process of technology selection. The cards should be arranged in a logical way. This exercise shows how
technical and social factors should be integrated. Each group discusses the best way to
arrive at a choice, and presents the results in a plenary session. The facilitator can use the
model given under background information to propose some feasible and realistic alternatives. The cards can be made using the text in the exercise sheets. As participants
usually find it useful to keep a record of all the exercises, it is recommended to have
secretarial support to record these exercises and distribute a copy to all the participants.
Conclusion
Linking technology choice with operation and maintenance is a key factor for
sustainability; the resulting choice depends on the use of appropriate criteria and the
selection process.
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
129
3. Exercise sheets: Sheet 1
Process of water supply technology choice
The facilitator should prepare beforehand a set of cards as described below, leaving some
blank ones for additional activities if needed, and distribute a complete set to the group. The
group will have to organize the cards in a logical sequence (some activities can be done in
parallel with others). All these activities have a definite direct or indirect impact on future O&M
activities.
Analysis of water quality
Analysis of data by the agency/department
Formal agreement
Formal request from community
Assessment of user’s
expectations
(men and women)
Analysis of comparative advantages
between various options
Initial service assumption
Participatory baseline survey
Collection of information
on hydrology
Discussion with communities on the options
and the implications on O&M and costs
Definition of management
responsibilities
Community meeting to decide
the technology option
Deposit of community
financial contribution
Initial contact with the community
Promotion campaign
Global hydro-geological survey
Willingness to pay for the
assessment
Analysis of existing or potential
spare parts distribution system
Assessment of financial
mechanisms to cover major
repairs and replacements
Assessment of available
technical skills
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130
Exercise sheet 2
Process of sanitation technology choice
The facilitator should prepare beforehand a set of cards as described below, leaving some
blank ones for additional activities if needed, and distribute a complete set to the group. The
group will have to organize the cards in a logical sequence (some activities can be done in
parallel with others). All these activities have a definite direct or indirect impact on future O&M
activities.
Participatory assessment
on sociocultural aspects
Study of the present situation
and practices
Selection of technology
by the community
Hygiene awareness
campaign
Baseline survey on
physical conditions
Assessment of men’s and
women’s preferences
Analysis of the comparative
advantages of various options
Participatory assessment
of problems related to sanitation
Discussion with the community
on O&M and the cost implication
of various options
Assessment of willingness to
pay for capital and O&M costs
Formal request by users
and/or the community
Identification of the availability
of technical skills
Identification of the availability
and cost of materials
Demonstration project in
selected families or areas
Start of sanitation
campaign
Set-up of financial mechanisms
for the purchase of latrines
Sanitary education
activities
Monitoring the use and hygienic
state of latrines
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131
4. Background information
4.1 Operation and maintenance specific criteria affecting water supply technology choice
Technical criteria
■ Technical standards; quality and longevity of equipment; spare parts needs,
costs, availability and accessibility
■ Dependence on fuel, power, chemicals; cost of O&M activities; cost of fuel and
chemicals
■ Complexity of operation and maintenance procedures: necessity of skilled
personnel
■ Potential for local manufacture, and for standardization
■ Use of local materials and equipment
■ Dependence on imported parts
■ Technical options available on the market
■ Water demand
Environmental
criteria
■ Quality of water source
■ Requirements for water treatment
■ Necessity for water source protection and wastewater management
Institutional and legal
criteria
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Legal framework and national strategy for O&M
Training capacity and follow-up support
Availability of technical assistance to the communities
Capacity of municipalities to dialogue and assist communities
Involvement of the formal (informal) private sector and NGOs
Monitoring capacity
National or local budget allocations for O&M activities
Availability of financial mechanisms to cover replacement and rehabilitation
costs
Community criteria
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Responsibility and ownership feeling
Desired service level
Demand for improved service level
Perception of benefits, culture, habits, beliefs
Organized and elected community structure to be responsible for O&M
Managerial capacity
Gender perspective in O&M activities
Technical skills available in the community or within reach of the community
Maintenance culture within the community
Tariff structure
Cost-recovery mechanisms to put in place
Financial management capacity
Ability and willingness to pay
4.2 Operation and maintenance specific criteria affecting sanitation technology selection
Experience has shown that many sanitation projects adopted interventions and technologies that were selected with poor assessment of the demand for sanitation. In these
instances, there was hardly any communication between the future users and the project
planners, and the social, gender, cultural and religious aspects were not taken into sufficient consideration.
In some cases, environmental factors were not considered in the design, which led to
unsafe situations and even the collapse of pit walls. Hygiene education to change sanitation behaviour was hardly mentioned in the adopted project approaches. Planning for
sanitation interventions therefore requires a comprehensive approach covering many
aspects. The Table below presents four groups of general and specific criteria which
influence sanitation technology choice.
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1. Technical
General criteria
Specific O&M criteria
■
■
■
■
■
Technical standards
Availability of construction materials
Estimated lifetime
Cost of construction
Design preference (substructure, floor slab, squatting
or raised seat, superstructure)
■ O&M requirements
■ Ease of access
■ Use for the decomposed waste
Soil texture, stability, permeability
Groundwater level
Control of environmental pollution
Availability of water
■ O&M implications for environmental protection
■ Groundwater contamination
2. Environmental ■
■
■
■
3. Institutional
■
■
■
■
■
Existing national/local strategies
Roles and responsibilities of actors
Training capacity
Availability of subsidies and loans
Availability of masons, carpenters, plumbers, sanitary
workers, diggers and persons to empty the pit
■ Monitoring
■
■
■
■
■
4. Community
■ Sociocultural aspects:
Taboos, traditional customs, religious rules and
regulations, cleansing material, preferred posture,
attitude to human faeces, gender-specific requirements
■ Motivational aspects:
Convenience, comfort, accessibility, privacy,
status and prestige, health, environmental cleanliness,
ownership
■ Discouraging factors:
Darkness, fear of falling in the hole or the pit collapsing,
fear of being seen from the outside, smells, insect
nuisance
■ Social organization factors:
Traditional role of community leaders, religious leaders,
school teachers, community-based health workers
■ Other factors:
Population densities, limited space for latrines,
acceptance of communal latrines
■
■
■
■
Pit-emptying services (municipal/private)
Sewerage maintenance capacity
Potential involvement of the private sector
National budget allocations for sanitation
Training and sensitization
O&M costs
Training and sensitization
Health awareness and perception of benefits
Presence of environmental sanitation
committee
■ Women’s groups
■ Social mobilization on hygiene and sanitation
behaviour
Upgrading an existing sanitation facility can be the first option for improving the
sanitation conditions if it matches the social and cultural preferences of the community,
as well as the local economic and technical capacities. If the existing facilities do not
meet basic hygiene requirements, then upgrading must be considered. If no sanitation
facilities are present, the simplest technology option is to be considered, taking into
account the factors mentioned above.
4.3 Technology selection process
The technology selection process will depend on the strategies adopted by the planners
and on basic principles which are emerging in the water and sanitation sector. One
principle is the need to involve communities right from the start of the selection process.
The agencies, the communities and users should therefore work together as partners,
and plan their activities based on mutual agreement. The latter is particularly important
in contexts where both men and women in the community and among the users are
increasingly taking on the responsibilities of operating, maintaining and managing their
water supply systems.
Various formulations of the word “technology” can be found in the literature, such as:
appropriate technology, progressive technology, alternative technology, intermediate
technology, village technology, low-cost technology, labour-intensive technology, self-help
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133
technology, and technology with a human face. In this course, we advocate a sustainable
technology, i.e. a technology that should, as much as possible, match the people’s needs,
expectations, preferences and cultural habits. It should be convenient, manageable,
maintainable and affordable.
Linking operation and maintenance with technology selection covers several aspects,
such as technical, environmental, financial, institutional and social aspects, and requires
the testing and feasibility study of the O&M system to be put in place. The O&M framework defines all the actors and their roles and organization in O&M, as well as their
interrelationships with one another.
Experience shows that the effectiveness of O&M is determined to a considerable
extent by non-technical issues. Therefore, the persons involved in assessing and developing O&M should come from a wide range of disciplines—social development, economics, health, management, and engineering. It is important that all of them should function
in partnership with the operators and users of the relevant services.
Rehabilitation of defective schemes is an economic alternative to investing in a new
project, but that decision should not be made lightly. The rehabilitation option has to be
evaluated, as one would a new scheme, by taking into consideration the community’s
needs, preferences and capacities to sustain whatever is undertaken, as well as the
support potential of the water agency. In assessing the scope for rehabilitation, community members and the agency should review the reasons for which the system needs to be
rehabilitated, by means of problem analysis, and carefully examine various feasible
technologies. Furthermore, rehabilitation should not simply be a matter of replacing
defective equipment or repairing damaged infrastructure because the most common
cause of failure is organizational. Finally, a word of caution: the community might in
some cases get the feeling that O&M does not concern them—believing that when the
system is out of order someone will come and put it right!
If a risk analysis is carried out for each water supply option, then an attempt can be
made to anticipate factors which may change and affect O&M. This will not be easy,
especially in unstable economies, e.g. with high inflation rates and restrictions on
imports, where equipment and spare parts are not easily available. However, a comparison of technologies can indicate the degree of risk attached to each option.
4.4 The process of community water supply technology choice
The following steps are proposed:
1. The community requests the agency for support to improve its water supply (demanddriven approach); this could be preceded by promotion and mobilization campaigns.
The expectations and preferences of the users (both men and women) and their
motivation should be assessed.
2. Initial service-level assessment—what service level is responsible for dealing with
environmental issues and the preferences of users (both men and women)? What are
the comparative advantages between various options (e.g. standposts and yard
connections)? The validity of hydrological, technical and institutional data collected
by agencies must be confirmed by local resource persons.
3. Participatory baseline survey, including needs and problem analysis with the community.
■ What reliable water source is available?
■ Can this source provide the required quantity and quality of water?
■ What is the treatment needed?
■ What materials, spares and skills are needed to sustain the desired service level?
■ What is the most appropriate structure to sustain the desired service level which
corresponds to the management capacity of the communities?
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■
4.
5.
6.
7.
What is the capacity of present community organization to manage, operate and
maintain an improved water supply system?
■ What is the involvement of women and men in community activities?
■ What are the costs (capital and recurrent) of the options considered?
■ What are the financial resources available and the willingness to pay?
■ What is the present approach to the application of O&M within the programme or
country area?
■ What are the causes and effects of poor O&M within the area?
■ Should technology match the available O&M system and capacity (including spare
parts distribution), or should the O&M system be adjusted to match the most suitable technology?
■ What type of support can the communities receive, in terms of technical, financial
and capacity-building assistance?
■ What is the overall impact of the option selected ?
Analysis of data by the agency, leading to the possible selection of the most suitable
technologies and service levels, including a review and appreciation of all specific
O&M criteria.
Presentation and discussions with the community of the most sustainable technologies, considering all O&M implications and commitment to long-term management
of O&M. Clarifications should be made at the same time on all necessary adjustments
of the existing O&M system, with a definition of the responsibilities of the actors
involved in the development of the project. Communities should be given enough
time to consider the options and the future implications of each one.
Formal agreement on technology selection between the community and all partners,
once the community has made its informed choice. This agreement can be formalized with a contract, and include a financial contribution (in cash or kind) from the
communities.
Finalization of planning for implementation.
4.5 The process of low-cost sanitation technology choice
It is assumed that the technology selection process is based on a participatory needs
assessment, which is carried out following an expressed demand for improved sanitation
facilities. Hygiene awareness and promotion campaigns can result in an increase in the
demand for improved facilities. The process of choosing sanitation technology should
include at least the following steps:
1. Participatory assessment of problems in the existing human excreta disposal system,
as well as in hygiene behaviour, environmental hygiene and human excreta-related
diseases. Participatory assessment of the cultural, social and religious influences on
the disposal of human excreta and choice of sanitation technology. Participatory
assessment of local conditions, convenience, capacities and resources (material
resources, human resources and finance).
2. Initial awareness-raising of the community on hygiene and sanitary matters—about
the benefits of safe human excreta disposal and appropriate human behaviours linked
to sanitation and personal hygiene.
3. Identification of local preferences and capacities for sanitation facilities and possible
variations. Matching these preferences with local capacities and environmental conditions including contamination risks, and determining the O&M requirements and
other implications of the technology options.
4. Discussions with the community about implementing different sanitation technology
options and their implications in terms of operation and maintenance.
5. Selection of one technology option by the community.
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135
Improvement of sanitation facilities should be accompanied by activities in Information-Education-Communication (IEC) to promote safe sanitation behaviour and proper
hygiene. These activities have a longer time horizon than the time required for improvement of physical structures. Schools and other institutions, churches, and social and
community groups have an important role to promote proper hygiene and sanitation
behaviour. Attention must be paid to selecting the most appropriate technology, design,
and site in order to prevent environmental pollution, particularly of water resources and
the living environment. Control measures must be carried out to minimize these risks.
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Unit 2: Institutional set-up
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To raise awareness about the importance of a proper institutional set-up for operation
and maintenance
■ To review the consequences of institutional changes, like those induced by decentralization and privatization
■ To review possible management options at the local level
■ To raise awareness on the importance of communication
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Review of analysis of participation exercise
3. Presentation and discussion on decentralization using a graphic
4. Document analysis on management options
5. Short presentation on various management models
6. Conclusion on the importance of communication
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead sheets
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Flip chart
➽ Handouts
✔ Exercise sheet
✔ Copies of transparencies
✔ Copies of selected parts of background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
The analysis of participation has shown that many actors are involved in different ways and
degrees in the operation, maintenance and management of rural water supply and sanitation services. This session reviews how the organization of all these actors provides an
effective maintenance system. Most developing countries today are undergoing structural
and institutional reforms, which have a far-reaching impact on the way mainenance will be
organized and on who will be responsible. The session analyses the framework in which the
actors evolve, which has links with the next session on community management.
Review of analysis of participation exercise
If the participation analysis exercise proposed in Module 2 (see page 107) has not yet been
carried out, it should be done now by referring to the directions given. The review of this
exercise consists in determining the degree of involvement and what could
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
137
happen at this stage, given the problems that have been identified. This review by the whole
group can be summarized in the following Table (the shading given below is an example).
Degree of involvement in O&M
Major actors
Slight
Medium
Major
National institutions
Provincial institutions
Local authorities
Community organizations
Users
Private sector and NGOs
External support agencies
Some conclusions can be drawn by the facilitator from this Table, e.g. that some
sectors are greatly involved, that the process is still very much “donor-driven”, that the
small role of the private sector and NGOs could be enhanced in the future, that the users
appear not to be sufficiently involved, etc.
Presentation and discussion on decentralization
The various trends affecting the sector especially on sustainability, decentralization,
private sector involvement, and new approaches are presented and discussed. The
facilitator can first recall the main points of sustainability, which have been stated in
Module 1, Unit 3 (page 35).
Document analysis on management options
The exercise sheets include descriptions of various forms of management options for
piped water supply projects. The management of handpumps systems will be reviewed in
the next session on community management. The participants will be divided into three
groups, corresponding to, for example, the management options proposed in the exercise sheets: 1) Concession to a community association; 2) Direct municipal management;
3) Cooperative association of public administration. Each group will review its management option, and highlight the strengths and weaknesses. The groups will briefly present
the results of their work in a plenary session.
Short presentation on various management models for a piped rural
water supply system
The facilitator will review the Table which summarizes these management models (see
background information, below).
Final conclusion on the importance of communication between all stakeholders
The facilitator starts a short game. He says to the group: “I will count to three and ask you
to clap your hands.... One ... two ...” (while speaking, the facilitator imitates the clapping
of the hands without really clapping). The result is that everyone claps. The facilitator
says: “I asked you to clap at three, and everyone claps at two! ... Where is the communication? Is this type of situation frequent in our workplace?” Allow time for discussion. The
facilitator then uses some of the information contained in the background information
to make a concluding presentation on the importance of communication, and on how to
set a communication strategy.
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3. Overhead and exercise sheets: Sheet 1
After having reviewed the situation analysis done previously,
mark the squares with a cross accordingly
Degree of involvement in O&M
Major actors
National institutions
Provincial institutions
Local authorities
Community organizations
Users
Private sector and NGOs
External support agencies
Slight
Medium
Major
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139
Overhead sheet 2
Substitution of responsibilities between government and
community in a context of decentralization, with necessary
accompanying measures
Degree of responsibility
of communities
❹ Autonomous system
Accompanying measures:
a. Building the capacity of communities
b. Reinforcing the role of the local authority
c. Promoting NGO/private sector participation
d. Changing the role of government
❸ Community management
❷
Community
participation
Centralized
system
❶
Degree of responsibility of government
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Overhead sheet 3
Who constitutes the private sector?
Actors in the private sector
O&M support role
International and national
manufacturers and suppliers
■ design and manufacture pumps and
other equipment for operation and
maintenance at the village level
■ supply spare parts and consumables
International and national
consultants
■ design schemes for community
management
■ develop community/agency-managed
O&M systems
■ provide O&M training
International and national
contractors
■ rehabilitate and extend schemes for
community O&M
■ on-the-job training of O&M staff during
construction
Local contractors
■ service and maintenance contracts
■ major repair work
Small-scale industries
■ local manufacture of spare parts and
tools
Nongovernmental organizations
(NGOs)
■ training, raising community awareness
■ technical assistance
Self-employed artisans in the
formal and informal sectors
■ local skills for preventive and
corrective maintenance and repair
work: mechanics, plumbers, builders,
masons, blacksmiths, electricians, etc.
■ operation of facilities
Local shops
■ provision of spare parts
Administrators and accountants
■ billing, rate collection, auditing of
accounts
Banks
■ banking facilities for O&M funds
■ credit facilities for irregular high-cost
items and for the expansion or
modification of facilities
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Overhead sheet 4
Approaches to development
Institutions
Supply-driven (top-down)
Communities
Institutions
Demand-driven (bottom-up)
Communities
Demand-responsiveness
(co-responsibility)
Institutions
Communities
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Overhead sheet 5
A communication planning sequence
includes:
● Identification and formulation of key issues to be
communicated
● Identification of target audiences
● Research on current knowledge, attitude and
practice of each target group around the required
future change in behaviour
● Development of messages based on current
knowledge and behaviour
● Pre-test messages
● Identification of appropriate communication
channels
● Preparation of communication materials
● Pre-test of materials
● Training of communicators
● Development of indicators to assess the impact
● Implementation of communication programme
● Assessment of impact and adjustment of
programme design
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DOCUMENT ANALYSIS 1
Concession to community associations
Briefly highlight the strong and weak points of this management option
for rural piped water supply systems
Communities can already count on existing associations, which sometimes have been organized in an informal way. It is important in this case that associations are organized in a formal way, and obtain legal status.
They will be established as non-profit-making associations with the aim of providing a public service, which
could give access not only to community resources but also resources coming from the municipality, the
province or the central government. The mayor can be a member of the association but has to promote
community participation and facilitate access to municipal, provincial and national funding. The community
association is organized in the following way:
General Assembly of Users
Election
Management Committee
Administrator and Treasurer
Caretaker
Operator
The General Assembly adopts decisions and elects the members of the Management Committee of the
Association. The Management Committee is composed of a President, a Vice-President, a Treasurer or
Administrator, a Secretary, representatives from the users, a representative from the local administration (if
decided by the General Assembly, and if the local conditions allow it). The General Assembly has the responsibility to supervise and control all managerial, technical and financial aspects of the service. The caretaker
and operator are responsible for the operation, maintenance and conservation of the whole system; they
participate in tariff collection as well. The Association has to be created by a decision of the General Assembly which passes an Act constituting the Committee. The General Assembly must study and approve the
Rules and Regulations for the functioning of the organization. The Constituting Act and the Rules, together
with a written application, are registered with the Chamber of Commerce. The creation of such an Association
will be authorized through an official document of the Municipal Council.
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DOCUMENT ANALYSIS 2
Direct municipal management
Briefly highlight the strong and weak points of this management option
for rural piped water supply systems
In this management option, the municipality is directly responsible for the administration of the water supply
service, through a department or unit which has been created for that purpose. However, several conditions
are applicable:
■ direct municipal management will be possible only if the municipality has made a public call for firms to
operate, manage and maintain the system, and if no one has proposed its services;
■ direct municipal management will be possible even if a private or public firm is available, only after a study
has shown that the operating cost of direct municipal management will be lower than that of the private
firm, and the quality of the service to the users will be higher.
It is stipulated that the accounts for the running of the service must be separated from the general accounts
of the municipality, and must distinguish between incomes through tariffs and income through subsidies.
Direct municipal management is organized in the following way:
Municipal Council
Municipal Committee of Public Services
Water Supply and Sanitation Department or Unit
Administration
Operation
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145
DOCUMENT ANALYSIS 3
Cooperative association of public administration
Briefly highlight the strong and weak points of this management option
for rural piped water supply systems
The cooperative association is an organization in private law, which aims at solving a social need through the
production and provision of a service. It is composed of associates including: users of the service, representatives of local authorities, representatives of other associations or public/private firms.
How is a cooperative association created? After an authorization obtained from the Municipal Council, a
General Assembly composed of all the associates elects the members of the Governing Board, approves the
charter and regulations, establishes policies and programmes, and gives the general orientation. The Governing Board is the permanent body for the management and administration of the cooperative association. It
will nominate or remove the manager, determine the profile for the staff, propose the budget for control
(which will have to be approved by the General Assembly), and convene the General Assembly. It is composed
of a President, Vice-President, a Secretary, and a Controller who are elected for a period of one year. The
cooperative association is organized in the following way:
General Assembly
of Associates
Election
Governing Board
Appointment
Manager
Commercial and
financial area
Operative
area
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DOCUMENT ANALYSIS 4
Private management
Municipality
Private enterprise
Operator
Rural communities
The municipality, after constant dialogue with the rural communities, contracts the services of a private firm
to manage, operate and maintain the water supply system, with the understanding that the communities will
be consulted over all matters that have a financial implication for them. The actual operation is done by an
operator who is employed by the private firm. The community, in turn, ensures basic preventive maintenance
and the payment of a fee. The firm will have to recover the costs through a tariff system, agreed with the
community and the municipality.
The contract with the private firm is renewable, and only concerns management, operation and maintenance.
All other activities, such as decisions for extension, rehabilitation and replacements, are the responsibility of
the municipality, in consultation with the community.
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147
4. Background information
4.1 Institutions are evolving
The concept of sustainability implies making some institutional changes as it highlights
the importance of community and user involvement, working in coordination with the
local authorities, in the demand, design, management, operation and maintenance of
the system. Sustainability also encourages the use of local resources, e.g. artisans and
shops, as well as NGO assistance to help develop the local economy.
Several countries are now implementing decentralization policies which have a direct
or indirect impact on the water and sanitation sector. The institutional implications,
however, vary from one country to another. The main aim for implementing a decentralization process is greater efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of public services.
It is based on the assumption that local institutions can better respond to the needs of
the population, and therefore adapt strategies and policies to the local context. Centrallevel institutions must change their role from provider of services to that of coordinator,
facilitator and support. This can be done by: 1) transfer of responsibilities from national
to provincial/communal level; 2) “deconcentration” of activities from national to local
levels; 3) transfer of various activities to other actors such as NGOs and the private sector.
The graphic on page 148 describes this decentralization process and its consequences.
In ❶ , the government is responsible for everything and the communities have no
legal authority in such a centralized system. This system has proved to be very inefficient,
especially with regard to O&M of rural water supply and sanitation systems.
In ❷ , the communities have a certain degree of responsibility ranging from participation in labour to payment of services. The government still keeps an important role in
the management of the system. This situation, which is now commonly accepted and
implemented in many projects around the world, corresponds to community participation but not community management.
In ❸ , communities manage their system, but still rely on technical assistance and
support. This situation corresponds to community management.
In ❹, communities are autonomous; very few communities in the world have been
able to sustain their activities in a completely autonomous way.
The main consequence of this process from government to community level is that it
increases the financial, operational, technical, and managerial burden at the local level,
which communities do not have the capacity to carry. This process must therefore rely on
accompanying measures such as:
■ Building the capacity of communities in technical, financial and managerial terms,
with awareness of gender questions.
■ Reinforcing the role of local authorities in coordination with communities, and
giving the technical and financial means to do so.
■ Promoting the participation of local nongovernmental organizations and small
private firms (formal and informal) in the provision of services (technical assistance, training, repairs, spare parts provision).
■ Changing the role of government institutions from provider of services to coordinator and facilitator.
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Degree of responsibility
of communities
❹ Autonomous system
Accompanying measures:
a. Building the capacity of communities
b. Reinforcing the role of the local authority
c. Promoting NGO/private sector participation
d. Changing the role of government
❸ Community management
Community
❷ participation
Centralized
system
❶
Degree of responsibility of government
4.2 Changes in the approach
Water supply and sanitation improvements may also be characterized by being either a
supply-driven or a demand-driven approach. In the present case, we shall be promoting
a demand-responsive approach (see page 141).
The supply-driven approach (top-down) is based on pre-selection of the intervention
area, with village and technology selection criteria based on policies of replication of
successful experiences in other countries or projects. This approach can have serious
implications for the sustainability of projects, particularly in terms of community acceptance, functioning, use and O&M costs—the community not being involved in any phase
of the project cycle.
In the case of a demand-driven project (bottom-up), the problems and needs are
identified with and by the communities. This may be preceded by some awarenessraising by extension workers. The advantages are that the motivation of the community
to participate in the planning, implementation and O&M phases will be high, and that
community-based management will be better accepted and implemented.
A demand-responsive approach (sharing responsibilities) puts the accent on two
sides—the need to elaborate projects around a demand emerging from the communities, but also on the capacity of the public and private, formal and informal organizations
to respond to this demand. As we have seen in the participation analysis, many actors are
involved in the operation, maintenance and management of water supply and sanitation
systems.
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149
4.3 Summary of various management options
MANAGEMENT OPTIONS
MAIN CHARACTERISTICS
Direct municipal management
Direct administration
Administration by the municipal service or department, with no
autonomous budget. Controlled by the mayor.
Autonomous administration
Administration by the municipal service or department, with
autonomous budget and separate services.
Semi-direct municipal management
Inter-municipal administration
Administration agreements between several municipalities, with
a coordination unit controlled by the municipalities, for managing
the system.
Direct or autonomous administration with
some activities delegated to other firms
Administration by the municipal service, with activities
delegated under a contractual service agreement to other firms
for a specific task, and a limited period of time.
Delegated management
Management contract to a firm or individual While the municipality remains responsible for the service in
investment and tariff setting, it delegates their management to a
firm or an individual, under a remuneration contract.
Special management contract to a firm
or an individual
Same as management contract described above, but with a
remuneration based on a fixed agreement with the municipality
and a percentage of the collected tariffs.
Leasing/renting contractual arrangements
with a firm
The municipality establishes a contract with a firm, which will
not be responsible for the investments, but only for the operation
and maintenance of the system, whose remuneration comes
through collected tariffs.
Public administration (cooperative
association)
Distinct legal status, and financial autonomy. Controlled by the
Assembly of Associates (where the municipality is a member
among others), with the authorization of the Municipal Council.
Concession to community associations
Associations created by a General Assembly of users, with the
authorization of the Municipal Council. It manages and operates
the system.
Concession to a private firm or society
Under a contractual agreement between the firm and the
Municipal Council, the firm will fully manage, operate and maintain
the system, with complete financial autonomy. The firm will
invest with its own resources, at its own risks, but the municipality
must approve them.
Private management
BOOT contractual agreement
(Build-Own-Operate-Transfer). Also
possible: BOT (Build-Operate-Transfer);
BOO (Build-Own-Operate); Inverse BOOT.
Under a contractual agreement, a private firm is totally
responsible for the construction, operation and management of
a system, but will transfer it to the municipality at the end of
the contract, which is usually long term. For the inverse BOOT,
the public authority builds, but the system becomes private at
the end of the contract.
Private management with public/private
capital
Private company whose shares are public and private; some
control is kept at the shareholders’ assembly.
Private management
Private company owns the system and is totally responsible.
As described above, the management options consist in a blend of ownership and
responsibilities between the public sector and the private or social sector (social sector =
associations). This can be graphically represented in the following way:
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Towards more ownership or responsibility
of the public sector
❶
❷
❸
❹
❺
❻
❼
➑
➒
0
❶●
❶❶
❶❷
❶❸
❶❹
Direct/autonomous administration
Inter-municipality administration
Direct/autonomous administration with service contracts
Administration with (special) management contracts
Leasing/renting contract
Cooperative associations
Concession to a community association
Concession to a private firm
BOT (Build-Operate-Transfer) contracts
BOOT (Build-Own-Operate-Transfer) contracts
BOO (Build-Own-Operate) contracts
Inverse BOOT contracts
Private company with public/private capital
Private company
Towards more ownership and responsibility
of the private or social sector
4.4 Issues affecting the choice of management models for the operation and maintenance of
rural water supply and sanitation systems1
The choice of an O&M management model is influenced by several key issues that are
listed below and are discussed in detail: capacity of traditional community organizations;
key community skills; health education and community participation; gender-balanced
development; complexity of technology; availability of spare parts; standardization and
local manufacture of equipment; requirements shared with other sectors; capacity of the
private sector; cost recovery mechanisms; ability and willingness to pay; national and
regional economies; logistics and transportation; government leadership; strength of
government agencies and staff; regional autonomy; policies and legislation; communication and information sharing.
Capacity of traditional community organizations
The community is a focal point in the management of rural WSS (water supply and
sanitation) systems because it has a vested interest in efficient operation and maintenance. By their very nature, communities are structured to provide leadership, conduct
social and religious activities, and attend to legal, property, and economic matters affecting their members. The control of traditional water supply sources and waste disposal
sites is part of this structure, since all communities have some type of WSS facilities,
however primitive these might be.
Some communities have a highly sophisticated set of rules and responsibilities for
managing their WSS facilities. For instance, communities located near rivers may not
have a rigorous management system, since water is readily available, but communities
with limited water supplies usually have strict rules governing individual rights and
responsibilities and impose penalties for violations. Similarly, densely populated communities usually have a tighter management system for sanitation facilities than those
more sparsely settled.
1
Extracts from: Management models for the operation and maintenance of rural water supply and sanitation systems, by Phil Roark. Arlington,
VA, WASH Project of the U.S. Agency for International Development, 1993 (WASH Technical Paper No. 71).
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While the physical environment dictates the need for certain levels of management,
so does the character of the society. There are significant differences between societies
and their view of management needs for WSS. Some societies have a strong communal
approach to meeting their needs; others prefer an individualistic approach. Some are
hierarchical while others are more diffuse in structure. These differences must be considered, and, whenever possible, the traditional management system should be empowered. However, certain technologies may require skills which the traditional management
system does not have, and new management models may need to be introduced.
Key community skills
Among the key community skills that must be considered in assessing local management
capacities are leadership, accounting, and mechanical aptitude. Leadership is required
to organize, motivate, and educate the community. Many decisions require a consensus
after the issues and alternatives have been clearly explained. For example, the siting of a
well or standpipe could be controversial, since one location will be more convenient to
some users only. The level of service and fee structures are questions that deserve wide
discussion. Many WSS projects rely upon community participation for the construction
of facilities. To marshal this work force requires leadership skills. Often communities can
draw on their experience in sectors unrelated to WSS, such as building a school.
Accounting and record-keeping skills are necessary for the proper collection and
disbursement of funds. Typically, families in a community pay a flat fee or one that is
based on the service received. In some cases, fund-raising such as the sale of crops from
a communal field is organized for the WSS facility. Community confidence must be
ensured by public disclosure of collections and spending and scrupulous accounting.
Further, decisions reached at meetings should be placed on record. In some developing
countries where literacy levels in rural areas are low, this is not always possible.
Some mechanical skills within the community are necessary. Depending on the technology involved, these can range from simple caretaker skills to repair skills for sophisticated machinery. Deep wells, for example, may be the only option for supplying potable
water to a community, but the pumping requirements may be beyond local repair capability. In such cases, the community will provide only caretaker and operational labour
and call upon outside assistance for repairs.
Training is one way of upgrading community skills. Of course, there are limits to
training adults with a low level of literacy, but for most areas of community need, instruction within these limits can achieve adequate results. Many projects provide WSS management committee members with training in the maintenance and repair of pumping
equipment.
Health education and community participation
In addition to technical and management training, the community’s understanding of
health, hygiene and community participation is important. This understanding may vary
considerably from region to region. For a WSS facility to be effective it must not only be
functional but also be used. Many properly designed WSS facilities have not been
utilized sufficiently or correctly due to ignorance of their health benefits. When poor
quality water is more easily available, good quality facilities are often allowed to fall into
disrepair. Sometimes clean water at the distribution point is polluted by the user through
improper transportation and storage.
Other areas of health awareness, particularly child survival activities, are also important. Widely disseminated information on the benefits of immunization, oral rehydration therapy, breastfeeding, and nutrition will reinforce understanding of the causes and
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effects of disease and lead to effective use of WSS facilities. Female literacy is a particularly important determinant of community health, since women are the key implementers of health practices. Since WSS projects usually are cited as a priority need among
potential beneficiaries, they often serve as a catalyst for the introduction of other health
interventions.
Gender-balanced development
Women are primarily responsible for obtaining and using water, but generally have not
been given much say in decision-making. The result has been facility designs and
management structures that hamper effective use. A gender balance of roles and responsibilities between men and women is therefore important in the design, construction,
management, and utilization of WSS systems.
The role of women as decision-makers varies among societies. While there is general
progress in increasing their participation, some societies maintain barriers that must be
respected in designing management systems.
Complexity of technology
Technologies for rural or periurban water systems range from capped springs that feed
gravity distribution systems, to deep wells equipped with electric pumps and a distribution system consisting of a storage tank and pipelines, to household connections. Sanitation systems in rural or periurban areas range from simple latrines to flush toilets with
cesspools. Many of these technologies have been in use for decades with only minor
changes. However, research has produced many new improvements adapted to the needs
of developing countries. For example, handpumps are now designed to be more robust
and easier to repair. Drilling rigs for shallow wells have been reduced in size and cost.
Pumping systems relying on wind and solar energy have been developed. Low-cost
latrines that are sanitary and well ventilated are now easily available.
Given this range of technological choice, the fundamental maxim is that the technology should be compatible with the beneficiaries’ ability to handle it. If repairs are too
complex for them, the next tier up must assume this responsibility. Some communities
may be able to repair part of a system, such as a pipeline, but not an electrical generator.
In this case the responsibility would have to be shared. Generally, it is preferable for the
beneficiaries to be primarily responsible for managing the system even if they require
outside mechanical assistance.
Availability of spare parts
The availability of spare parts has been a recurring problem for many WSS projects.
Some have installed hundreds of handpumps and presumed that market mechanisms
would impel local hardware dealers to provide the needed parts. In certain countries
government agencies retain this responsibility, in others they import spare parts and rely
on a commercial system for distribution. In any case, the laws of supply and demand do
not always work as expected. Too often the systems fail because spare parts are simply
inaccessible.
Standardization and local manufacture of equipment
The installation of pumps made by several foreign manufacturers has led to a chaotic
situation in many countries. Spare parts are often not available and repairers are not
familiar with certain pump designs. This situation is largely the result of bilateral aid
which restricts procurement to pumps manufactured in the donor country. Some devel-
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oping countries, in response, have insisted on specifying which pumps they will accept.
Many of these countries are now developing an indigenous capacity for the manufacture of plastics for pipes and well casing. Local manufacture also eliminates the need for
hard currency, which is always in short supply.
Requirements shared with other sectors
Procurement problems often can be eased by considering the requirements that the
WSS sector shares with other sectors. The irrigation sector, for example, uses considerable quantities of pumping equipment, pipes, and related materials. The housing sector
uses faucets, toilets, pipes, and building materials. The market for equipment in one
sector can influence decisions in another sector. Thus, a new irrigation project could
determine the type of pump the WSS sector would select for a project in the same
region.
Capacity of private sector
The private sector may have a role in the design, construction, maintenance, and repair
of WSS facilities. In urban areas there is seldom a question of its capacity; in rural areas
its presence may be limited or nonexistent. Some projects have trained repairers to maintain several facilities in a region. Others have presumed that a sufficiently large market
will in itself attract repairers to the target area. This generally is true of WSS facilities
near urban centres.
If the profits to be made are reasonable, private sector participation is usually
assured. Some projects have established prices for services and parts to protect the communities from being cheated. But prices must be fixed with due regard to adequate
financial returns in the context of the local economy. Tasks such as well drilling and the
construction of storage reservoirs are best contracted to the private sector. Many projects
arrange franchised regional repairers for the equipment installed.
Cost recovery mechanisms
Government policies requiring cost recovery in WSS projects have two objectives: to make
the beneficiaries pay for the benefits they enjoy; and to ensure that the beneficiaries gain
a sense of ownership and thereby a concern for preserving the facilities. The costs of
many rural WSS projects are beyond the means of the communities they serve, and the
government or a donor subsidizes all or part of these costs. The philosophy behind this is
that state revenues are to be distributed for the national good, and that rural health and
living standards are entitled to special attention if this goal is pursued. However, if a
project is to be sustainable, the beneficiaries must be able to fully cover all operation and
maintenance and replacement costs.
Among the cost recovery mechanisms employed in WSS projects, perhaps the most
common is a flat monthly fee levied on each family or household. In arid zones, where
water is at a premium and conservation is essential, water typically is sold by the unit
volume. When water is pumped by a fuel-driven engine, volume sales are the norm. In
areas where cash is not in general use, communal sales of agricultural products are
earmarked for the WSS system. Some communities insist on payment from every consumer, while others may provide free water to the very poor. In some notable instances,
communities receive funds from richer members who have moved to the city or to
foreign countries.
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Ability and willingness to pay
The ability to pay is a function of disposable income and depends on the absolute wealth
of the wage earners in a household. WSS interventions must be scaled to a level compatible with the ability to pay.
Willingness to pay is a different matter, influencing all expenditures including that
for WSS service. Where there is no alternative water choice, the willingness to pay may be
quite high, resulting in vastly inflated prices. Thus, water vendors in peri-urban areas
often charge several times the price that is paid in the adjacent urban zone. In contrast,
improved water supplies may not be used if there are streams nearby and the cost of
water from the improved source is considered high. Water quality is often ignored if
water can be obtained free from an unimproved source. In societies where women control money, they are often more willing to pay for water than men are, realizing the
benefit of a clean and convenient source. For sanitation facilities, convenience and
privacy are paramount. Dwellers in dense housing neighbourhoods appear more willing
than their rural counterparts to pay for latrines or toilets.
Because of difficulties with payment, many projects require funds to be collected in
advance for O&M, and sometimes for construction, as evidence of the community’s willingness to participate. In other cases, potential participants are surveyed to determine
their willingness to pay. These surveys require the use of appropriate sampling techniques to ensure accurate answers to delicate questions related to personal financial
preferences.
National and regional economies
Many developing countries have high rates of inflation, cost of living, and unemployment, all of which have a significant effect on O&M management. High inflation
requires careful attention to budget planning. Many meticulous plans have crumbled
because of the loss of buying power by local currencies. Rapidly rising prices of basic
commodities also plague certain countries. Fuel prices are often critical for WSS projects
that use engines for well drilling or pumping.
Unemployment can create a large labour pool for labour-intensive tasks such as the
digging of a pipeline. This lessens the need for expensive machinery and places responsibility in the hands of the beneficiaries. Some communities carry out such tasks without
remuneration as their contribution to the project. These tasks should be arranged to
coincide with seasonal levels of unemployment, so that they do not interfere with the
regular agricultural cycles for planting and harvesting, when everyone is busy.
Some countries have regional pockets with distinctive characteristics that set them
apart from the national economy. These may be areas of high poverty which lack natural
resources, or they may border a country that has a more developed economy and thus be
in a more favourable position to support development projects.
Logistics and transportation
Isolated areas are difficult to reach because of long distances, and bad roads will add to
project costs and increase the uncertainties in planning. These matters will require
special attention in the logistics of communication and transport of supplies.
Government leadership
The strength of government leadership in the WSS sector is an important factor in
selecting a management model. However, it should be noted that most countries are now
going through a process of decentralization, which gives a new perspective to the role of
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the government. This role is changing from a supplier of services to that of sector coordinator and facilitator. Some prudence is necessary, however, in evaluating public
pronouncements. It is not uncommon for politicians to develop platforms that call for
improvements in the WSS sector. Some governments take a paternalistic attitude to
providing for the people’s welfare.
Visible and active leadership is needed to bring issues relating to WSS to the forefront. Where government leadership is lacking, more emphasis must necessarily be placed
on management approaches adapted to fit local conditions.
Strength of government agencies and staff
Institutional effectiveness is a critical factor in the sector and is influenced particularly by
the organizational framework and the quality of the staff. The organizational framework
should encompass all the components of the sector from planning and design to operation and maintenance, with support for programmes of health education and community participation. There should be clear lines of authority and responsibility, and when
several government agencies are involved, coordinating mechanisms are essential. Often
the Ministry of Public Works and the Ministry of Health are each assigned special tasks:
the former is responsible for constructing the systems, while the latter is responsible for
health education and community surveys. Coordination is crucial but difficult unless
there is a formal organizational agreement and framework. Extension agents are the
vital link between the agency and the community. There must be enough of them to
cover vast rural areas, and they must have adequate transportation and be skilled in
community outreach techniques. Another important requirement for a successful agency
is a budget large enough to carry out the mandate, including budget lines for staff
salaries, administration, equipment, transportation, and training. Attractive salaries and
benefits are necessary for retaining good workers since the private sector often competes
for their skills.
Regional autonomy
Many countries have wide regional differences in climate, topography, land use, social
and religious customs, economy, and access to services and materials. Climates may range
from tropical to arid, requiring significant differences in the approach to WSS projects.
Mountainous regions may offer abundant spring development, while flat lands may
require deep drilling. Local cultures can differ considerably and can be separated by
their beliefs and geographical distances. Some regions may have a relative abundance of
natural resources. In large countries travel to outlying areas may be arduous. All these
differences are conducive to the creation or strengthening of regional administrations.
Decentralization brings power nearer to the beneficiaries. Central control of the WSS
sector in countries with significant regional autonomy can be detrimental to development.
Policies and legislation
Without sound policies and legislation, there is little chance for significant WSS development. Policies must express government goals and objectives, and issues must be clearly
defined. Policies governing the following issues are particularly important:
■
■
■
the responsibilities of the communities and their ownership of the WSS systems;
technology choices affecting equipment standardization and the procurement of
spare parts;
the role of the private sector;
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■
■
cost recovery mechanisms and fee structures;
the role of government agencies and the scope of their support.
The application and enforcement of government policies and legislation must be
judged by the results. Comparisons between stated goals and actual outputs offer useful
insights.
Communication and information sharing
Communication and information sharing spring from a commitment to the process.
Objectives can be met only if adequate information is available at all levels from the
communities to the central government. All players within the sector should be fully
aware of policies, legislation, decrees, administrative decisions, and any other pertinent
matters. While the lack of technological hardware sometimes impedes communication
with distant points, more often it is a lack of will that is the cause.
Mass communication techniques such as radio messages in local languages have been
successfully used to inform dispersed populations in rural areas. Frequent visits by extension agents to the communities are also an important means of communication, as are
audiovisual aids such as posters, bulletins, and videos.
4.5 The importance of communication1
One area often overlooked in planning a water and sanitation programme is the need
for a clearly articulated and systematic communication strategy. The inclusion of a planned
communication strategy not only recognizes the necessity of communicating with
people, it articulates the needs of each stakeholder and helps find a way to bridge the
gap between planners, government agencies, the private sector and communities.
Communication can also both complement and, in some cases, substitute for the
regulatory work. It can complement because the design and successful implementation
of a rural water policy requires a level of dialogue between those who design or implement the policy and those who are addressed by it. It substitutes for other instruments
when it motivates people to change their behaviour voluntarily.
Communication is not the same as “telling”; to “communicate” implies a two-way
process. A communication strategy must include the opportunity for feedback from the
audience to the sender and back again. When people are allowed to participate in the
process of defining and implementing the rules for their own water strategy, the potential for sustainability is accelerated. A corollary to this is the need to “listen”, and therefore communication requires “listening”. If the messages coming back across the feedback
loop are not listened to (and acted upon where appropriate), communication is not
taking place.
In order to be effective, a communication strategy must be deliberately and systematically planned. While most programme planners assume that some level of communication will take place, whenever it does, it does so on an ad-hoc basis without necessarily
reflecting the communication needs of different groups of people, nor does it facilitate
a two-way dialogue between planners and people.
A communication planning sequence can include the following activities:
■
■
1
Identification and formulation of key issues to be communicated
Identification of target audiences
Extracts from: Study of the institutional arrangements for the provision of rural water supply and sanitation services in Mozambique.
Toronto (Canada), Cowater International Inc. (with the National Directorate of Water of Mozambique in Maputo), 1993.
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
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■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Research on current knowledge, attitude and practice of each target group which
will help to promote the required future change in behaviour
Development of messages based on current knowledge and behaviour
Pre-test messages
Identification of appropriate communication channels
Preparation of communication materials
Pre-test of materials
Training of communicators
Development of indicators to assess impact
Implementation of communication programme
Assessment of impact and adjustment of programme design.
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Unit 3: Community management
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ Participants understand the concepts of community participation and community management
■ Participants are familiar with the pros and cons of degrees of community involvement
in management
■ Participants are aware of the resistance to change and how to deal with this when
working with communities
■ Participants have identified ways to approach the community and facilitate community management
➽ Methodology
1. Introduction
2. Discussion on: “What is a community?” and “What is management?”
3. Role-play on resistance to change and ways to deal with it
4. Participatory lecture on community management
5. Concluding exercise on the prerequisites for community management
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Flip chart and markers
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of transparencies
✔ Exercise sheet
✔ Extracts from background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introduction
One major element of the concept of sustainability is community management. This
session highlights this element, which will be followed by a session on gender issues and
another on how to approach and work with communities.
Discussion on “What is a community?” and “What is community management?”
It is important first to assess the participants’ familiarity with community management
approaches by having a discussion. The concept of community management contains
the word “community”. Too often the community is taken for granted. Support and
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development agencies just assume that the people they support form some kind of a
‘common-unity’, that is a group of people sharing common values and interests. Too
often it is assumed that people living in a specific geographic unit or administrative
service area (e.g. a district, a subdistrict or ward, a village, a village quarter, or a group of
households sharing a water point) form a homogeneous group. Is this true?
Participants should reflect on this by asking themselves questions like: “Are you a
member of a community? Which one? Are you a member of other communities? Which
ones?”
Similarly a rural community does not necessarily consist of a homogeneous group of
people. Participants can identify typical subgroups within a community (e.g. rich/poor,
peasants/cattle owners, women/men, groups using water for different purposes, polluters/nonpolluters, people living in the centre/in the periphery, and highly/poorly
educated people).
Support agents should be aware of this and take into account these differences within
a ‘community’ when promoting community-based management.
In the term community management is also the word “management”. It is important
to make some clear distinction on what is meant by management in “community management”. The facilitator therefore asks the participants the question, “What does management mean in community management?”, and highlights the difference between
community participation and community management. The overhead sheets and background information provide more information on this matter.
Role-play on resistance to change and ways to deal with it
This exercise has several objectives: a) the receptivity of a community to a water project
can be very different; b) as communities are not all the same, it would be wrong to apply
only one type of approach to all communities; c) there are appropriate responses to each
type of community.
The role-play should be prepared beforehand. It is in fact both a role-play and a
presentation, and basically involves two persons: 1) an “engineer”, who represents the
project assistance, and 2) a “peasant” (preferably a woman), who represents the community. The latter can wear traditional clothing or the traditional headgear of a peasant.
The facilitator prepares in advance some cards, which correspond to the various steps
of the role-play/presentation, similar to that shown in the overhead sheet (Resistance to
change continuum, see page 167). On a board should be drawn only the “climbing”
steps. The seven steps will be filled in gradually.
Step 1: The community does not see the need for any improvement;
there are no problems!
No!
Awareness-raising
■
Cards needed:
■
Role-play: The engineer arrives in the community very happy to have something to
propose to them. He briefly presents to the “peasant” (who looks quite surprised!) his
water supply improvement project. But soon, the peasant manifests her opposition,
and says there is no problem with the water they drink, that they have been drinking
this water for generations, and that they don’t need this project. She throws the
engineer out!
Question to the participants: “Is this a common situation?”; “Can you give an
example?”
■
and
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■
Presentation: The “No!” card is put on the board at the level of the corresponding
step of the drawing. The facilitator explains that the best way to approach the
community in this situation is to organize “awareness-raising” activities, puts up the
“Awareness-raising” card and briefly tells them what this means.
Step 2: The community sees the problem but it feels that it is not their responsibility
Maybe!
Mobilization
■
Cards needed:
■
Role-play: The engineer arrives in the community and explains briefly what the project
is about. This time, the peasant says that the project looks interesting but it is not
their responsibility; they pay enough taxes to the government and it is up to the
government and the project staff to take this responsibility. Again the peasant throws
the engineer out!
Question to the participants: “Is this a common situation?”; “Can you give an
example?”
Presentation: The “Maybe!” card is put on the board at the level of the corresponding
step of the drawing. The facilitator explains that the best way to approach the community in this case is to organize mobilization activities, puts up the “Mobilization”
card and briefly tells them what this means.
■
■
and
Step 3: The community sees that there is a problem but has doubts about the
proposed project
Doubts!
Information
■
Cards needed:
■
Role-play: The engineer again arrives in the community. The peasant recognizes him
and says that they now see that there is a problem in their community concerning safe
water supply, and that they accept that they will have to take some part of the responsibility. But they have strong doubts about the proposed solution, and they don’t
understand why this is proposed.
Question to the participants: “Is this a common situation?”; “Can you give an
example?”
Presentation: The “Doubts!” card is put on the board at the level of the corresponding step of the drawing. The facilitator explains that the best way to approach the
community in such cases is to organize participatory information activities, puts up
the “Information” card and briefly describes what this means.
■
■
and
Step 4: The community sees that there is a problem but is afraid of the changes that it
might bring
Afraid
Demonstration
■
Cards needed:
■
Role-play: The engineer arrives in the community, and the peasant seems somewhat
reluctant to accept the project, because they are afraid of all the implications that it
will have, especially the changes in the community’s present habits. The peasant thanks
the engineer, and says that sometime in the future they will accept it.
Question to the participants: “Is this a common situation?”; “Can you give an
example?”
■
and
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■
Presentation: The “Afraid” card is put on the board at the level of the corresponding
step of the drawing. The facilitator explains that the best way to approach the
community in such a case is to organize demonstration activities, puts up the “Demonstration” card and briefly explains what this means.
Step 5: The community sees the problem and is willing to take responsibility, and
feels somehow that the option is appropriate to their situation, but they don’t
know enough about it yet
What?
Training
■
Cards needed:
■
Role-play: This time, when the engineer enters the community the peasant is much
more welcoming and tells him that they like the project but feel that they need to
know more. The engineer then sits down with the peasant in order to organize the
timing of the training events.
Question to the participants: “Is this a common situation?”; “Can you give an
example?”
Presentation: The “What?” card is put on the board at the level of the corresponding
step of the drawing. The facilitator explains that the best way to approach the community in this case is to organize training activities, puts up the “Training” card and
explains briefly what this means.
■
■
and
Step 6: The community is ready for a change, accepts the responsibility, and requests
that the project be implemented
Yes !
Implementation
■
Cards needed:
■
Role-play: The community warmly welcomes the engineer with simulation of a party,
and is ready to move ahead with the project. Some mention should be made about
the contribution the community has agreed to make, in terms of cash or labour, as
well as in terms of responsibilities.
Question to the participants: “Is this a common situation?”; “Can you give an
example?”
Presentation: The “Yes!” card is put on the board at the level of the corresponding
step of the drawing. The facilitator explains that the best way to approach the community in this case is to organize the implementation of the project, puts up the
“Implementation” card and briefly explains what this means.
■
■
and
Step 7: The community has been involved in the implementation of the project and is
willing to demonstrate to other communities the benefits of such a project
Yes, and ...
Duplication
■
Cards needed:
■
Role-play: The engineer and the peasant are seen discussing how successful the project
has been. The peasant says that if other communities around them have the same
problem, she would be willing to collaborate with the engineer to demonstrate to
them the positive benefits of the project.
Question to the participants: “Is this a common situation?”; “Can you give an
example?”
■
and
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■
Presentation: The “Yes, and...” card is put on the board at the level of the corresponding step of the drawing. The facilitator explains that the best way to approach the
community in this case is to organize the duplication of the project, puts up the
“Duplication” card and briefly explains what this means.
Participatory lecture on community management
The facilitator then proceeds with an interactive presentation, using the following overhead sheets (see pages 168–173):
■
■
■
■
■
■
Why involve communities in the management, operation and maintenance of
rural water supply and sanitation?
Goals of community management
Characteristics of community management
Forms of community management
Typical tasks of a water committee
Composition and legal status of a water committee.
Concluding exercise on the prerequisites for community management
The facilitator asks the group, “What are the main elements which should be looked at in
order to reach sustainable community management?” The facilitator writes down their
answers on the board, using as a reference the list provided in the overhead sheet (page
174).
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3. Overhead sheets: Sheet 1
What is a community?
● Is a community a group of people sharing
common values and interests?
● A community can be heterogeneous in various
aspects
● A community does not necessarily live in one
contiguous geographic area
● People can be a member of a number of
communities
● A ‘community’ can also consist of groups of
people with divergent values and interests:
rich/poor
peasants/cattle-raisers
women/men
people using water for different purposes
polluters/nonpolluters
people living in the centre/in the periphery
highly educated/low educated
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Overhead sheet 2
What is management?
● Planning
Development of a strategy, objectives, and results
to be reached—with what resources and in what
time?
● Organization
Distribution of responsibilities and tasks
● Decision-making
Taking decisions on regular activities, as
mandated
● Coordination
Harmonization of contacts between various
actors, and communication
● Control
Supervision and enforcement
● Monitoring
Regular check and problem-solving
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Overhead sheet 3
What is community
management?
Social management
(all aspects linked to the organization of the
community)
Technical management
(all aspects linked to O&M technical activities)
Financial management
(accounting, tariff setting and all aspects of O&M
cost recovery)
Community’s contribution
kind towards maintenance
Community’s involvement
Only some community members
Role of “outsiders”
Decide on contribution level
Aim/Benefit
Lower cost
Cost recovery
Assumption
Contribution indicates service is
valued and shows commitment
Limitation
Commitment only from some
Not all involved, e.g. women, the
users; system rejected if major
breakdowns occur
Community’s contribution
■ Free construction labour
■ Free local raw materials
Community’s involvement
Only carrying out work
Role of “outsiders”
Idea, planning and design
Aim/Benefit
Lower cost
Assumption
Pride will lead to maintenance
Limitation
Not a community priority
Contribution not voluntary
Use and maintenance may
vanish
■ Token contribution in cash or in
Participation as
‘cost-sharing’
Participation as a form of
‘cheap labour’
Limitation
Not all villagers may be involved in
the decision. Contract not fully
understood.
Selection of committee and caretaker too hasty; willingness to pay
can be poor after some time
Assumption
Legitimizes the project; local
management; technology transfer
through contract
Aim/Benefit
Minimal local management infrastructure (local leadership, local
committee, local maintenance
volunteer)
Role of “outsiders”
Develop ideas and contract
Community’s involvement
Not all community members;
contract can be commented on
Community’s contribution
■ Volunteers in committee
■ Volunteer as caretaker
■ Commitment by leaders
■ Contributions
Participation done as a
‘contractual arrangement’
Limitation
Requires highly trained and motivated staff;
Difficult, time-consuming, expensive
Assumption
Long-term benefits and increased use and
sustainability justify high investment (staff,
time, costs)
Aim/Benefit
Genuine commitment and support from whole
community through participatory community
education and involvement in decision-making
from the start
Role of “outsiders”
Facilitation, advice
Community’s involvement
All community members, including women
Community’s contribution
■ Community fully in charge with possible
subsidies for capital investments; part of
running costs/support
Responsibility in
‘decision-making’
What is the difference between community participation and community management?
(adapted from Community Water Supply and Sanitation Conference material, May 1998, Washington, DC, World Bank–UNDP)
Overhead sheet 4
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No problem.
Community satisfied
as things are.
No reason for change.
1. “No!”
Awareness-raising
Maybe there is a
problem, but it’s not
our responsibility.
Yes, there is a
problem, but
doubts about
proposed
solution.
The problem is
clear, we need to
know more
about it.
We are willing to
start activities.
6. “Yes!”
We are willing to
demonstrate the
solution to others.
7. “Yes, and …”
Duplication
Implementation
5. “What?”
Training
Yes, there is a
problem, but
afraid of changing
for fear of loss.
4. “Afraid”
Demonstration
3. “Doubts”
Information
2. “Maybe”
Mobilization
Adapted from SARAR: Resistance to change continuum
Ways to approach a community
Overhead sheet 5
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Overhead sheet 6
Why involve communities in the
management, operation and
maintenance of RWSS?
● Building on existing local knowledge and management
capacities
● All social groups feel concerned and can participate
● Addressing the true needs of community members
● Solutions acceptable to community members
● Solutions adapted to community capacities
● Increased community commitment to improve the
situation
● Better understanding of the causes and effects of
problems
● Empowering the community and reducing dependency
● Increased sense of ownership and responsibility
● Increased self-consciousness and confidence in own
capacities
● Direct interest to have a system well maintained
● Possible improvement of willingness to pay
● Reduced overall and government costs
● Improved reliability and sustainability of systems
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Overhead sheet 7
Goals of community
management
● Improved reliability and sustainability of the
system
● More appropriate choice of technology and
service levels
● Reducing investment and operation costs for both
the support agencies (government) and the
communities
● Increased confidence and problem-solving
capacities for further development activities
● Promoting gender-sensitive solutions
● Contributing to democratization and equity in the
development process
● Increased health and socioeconomic well-being
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Overhead sheet 8
Characteristics of community
management
Community is responsible for:
● Maintenance and repair
● Local management and organization
● Financing
Community decides on:
● Technology choice
● Service level
● Form of local organization
● Local rules and regulations on use
● Financing mechanisms
● Sanctions
Community controls:
● Ownership of the system
● Outcome of decisions
● Quality of work done and functioning of the
system
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Overhead sheet 9
Forms of community
management
The forms of community management vary according to the size of the
community, the technology used, the local context, and national legislation.
Basically, community management operates through a Committee whose
members are elected by a General Assembly of users. The following forms can
be found:
● Tap or Neighbourhood Committee
Responsible for operating and maintaining a specific water point.
● Water Committee
Responsible for all activities (managerial, operational, technical and financial)
of a particular scheme, which covers a larger area than a neighborhood and
possibly the whole community.
● Village Association
Responsible for all development activities concerning the village, and includes
overseeing water and sanitation.
● “Coordinating” Water Committee
Responsible for managerial and financial matters and coordination of several
smaller committees (tap/standpost or neighbourhood committees), which
retain responsibility for operation, maintenance and collection of fees.
● Water Committee contracting a private body
Responsible for general management and control, but contracts a private
body (an individual, a mechanic, a group of artisans, or a firm) to operate and
maintain the system.
● Delegated responsibility by local authority
Ownership and decision-making are held by the local authority, while the water
committee operates and manages the system.
● Inter-community Federation of Committees
When several communities share the same pipe source or water source, each
community has a water committee to operate and maintain its own water
point and collect fees, part of which goes to an Association or Federation of
Committees for maintenance of the whole system (pipes, source).
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Overhead sheet 10
Typical tasks of a Water Committee
1. Represents the community in contacts with
support agencies
2. Coordinates with other community institutions and
decision-making bodies
3. Ensures efficient and effective overall
management of systems:
● takes up assigned roles and tasks
● ensures equity
● organizes contributions
● organizes effective O&M
● ensures accurate financial management
● promotes hygienic and effective use of facilities
● holds regular committee meetings
● ensures good communication at all levels
● provides information and feedback
● collects information.
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Overhead sheet 11
Composition and legal status of
a Water Committee
The composition of a Water Committee will vary according to its
management and operational mandate.
Generally it is composed of a President, Vice-President, Treasurer
and several representatives of the users, with a balance between
posts occupied by men and by women. If the community is directly
responsible for the technical operation and maintenance of the system,
the Committee also includes the operator and/or caretaker.
In many countries, the Water Committee does not have proper legal
status. This makes it vulnerable in situations with material, financial,
contractual or legal problems. The following types of legal status are
found:
● The Municipality officially registers the Water Committee
If it has been elected by a General Assembly of users, a
“constituting” Act must be produced by the Assembly
● The Water Committee is registered with the Chamber of
Commerce as a non-profit-making Association
● The Water Committee is registered with the Chamber of
Commerce as an Association with an economic interest
It can then operate as a concession or under contractual
arrangements with local authorities
● The Water Committee operates under the legal mandate
of a Development Association
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Overhead sheet 12
Prerequisites for
community management
● Demand to improve the system
● Policy and legal framework for promoting
community management
● Effective external support, if required
● Information on system options, as well as on cost
and technical implications of each system, must
be available to the community
● Technology options must be selected with the
communities, and adapted to the community’s
capacities and needs
● The community understands the implications of
choice in terms of responsibilities and tasks
● The community is willing to pay
● The community has decision-making power
● The community has access to required capacitybuilding support
● There should be a policy framework to permit and
support community management
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4. Background information1
4.1 The concept of community management
Community management has different connotations in the literature. This was also the
case with community participation, the definition of which already in 1982 ranged from
the provision of free community labour inputs in government projects, to auto-nomous
self-reliant development. Despite or perhaps because of the unclear definition, community management of water supply and sanitation systems has increasingly been seen as a
fundamental option for sustainable development. Community management of services,
backed by measures to strengthen local institutions in implementing and sustaining
water and sanitation programmes, was one of the guiding principles adopted in the New
Delhi Consultation in 1990 and reconfirmed in Agenda 21.
Why is it believed that community management of water supply and sanitation systems will be any more successful in achieving sustainable coverage than the top-down
approaches from the past? Experience in many developing countries shows that even
very good water agencies cannot successfully operate and maintain a network of widely
dispersed water systems without the full involvement and commitment of the users.
Despite the best endeavours of central agencies, the overstretching of staff, transport
and budgets has led to breakdowns in the system, dissatisfied consumers and demoralized agency personnel. Many governments are becoming convinced that centralized
systems cannot deliver the required services for the sector. This resulted in a strong push
towards decentralization which started in the late 1980s.
Hopes are now high with respect to community management, because it is believed
that this approach seeks to make the best use of the available resources in the community
with some support from government agencies. It puts the people in charge of their own
water systems in a flexible partnership with the supporting agencies. Communities take
on more tasks and responsibilities, and relieve the agencies of all routine management
and maintenance duties. This frees the agency’s resources, which can be used to reach
more people. Successful community management is claimed to build community confidence and stimulate wider development efforts. It is also stressed that there is still a lot to
learn.
Much of this learning is at the level of the agencies and institutions, which often hold
the purse strings and so can dictate the course of development. Increasingly, governments and institutions are trying to adopt a more integrated and demand-responsive
approach. This is stimulated by the growing pressure to focus on sustainable functioning
and effective use of water supply and sanitation systems. Another reason why government agencies are searching for alternatives and are amenable to participatory approaches
is that, over the past two decades, blueprints of development strategies have been shown
to be ineffective in meeting the basic needs of large numbers of marginalized, vulnerable people. Thus public sector agencies are showing a growing interest in participatory
approaches that involve the community in their attempt to do more with fewer financial
resources. They are developing, for example, links with NGOs that used similar types of
approaches.
In this context, it is surprising that agencies do not have internal mechanisms to learn
from their experience with communities, to learn how to work with them, and to share
this among their staff. What is needed is an approach to learning that allows the development of new methodologies and promotes change in the prevailing attitudes, behaviours, norms, skills and procedures within the agencies.
Not only do the agency staff have to learn to work with the communities and
1
Most of this background information has been extracted from: “Putting Community Management in Place”—Four years of experience
with improving water management in rural communities—Community Managers for Tomorrow. Document N.1, IRC, 1998.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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overcome the top-down approach from the past, but the communities also must come to
grips with working with the agency staff in a horizontal relationship. In the future, the
push for change will be more radical, with increasing decentralization and with communities who will bear a larger share of the cost. Then the paradigm shift from communities
participating in agency projects to agencies participating in community projects will
become even more important.
According to Franz Gahwiller of SKAT (Swiss Centre for Development Cooperation
in Technology and Management), “... we usually do not allow for the required time to
initiate a process of change. Such a process may take years and years, but we want the
communities to manage their systems as soon as possible. Moreover, the societal environment for such processes of change needs to be democratic.”
4.2 Some findings from the field
In 1995 a participatory action research (PAR) project on community management for
rural water supply was initiated by IRC together with partner organizations in six countries (Cameroon, Colombia, Guatemala, Kenya, Nepal and Pakistan). Local research teams
worked closely with community members in 24 communities to better understand community management and to explore possible improvements. The essence of this project
is to help communities to gain a better understanding of the problems they face and to
let them become a key factor in problem-solving. “The knowledge we gain from this
‘research’ is much more valuable than gifts. It is something we keep for life” (villager
from Nkoundja, Cameroon). Community members thus become catalysts and in beginning to understand and discuss their problems, they create the space to allow a range of
actors to participate and express their views.
A first assessment of the situation in the six countries indicates that:
■
■
■
■
■
■
In each country, community management of completed rural water supply systems
is the accepted national policy, but implementation is not universal and each agency
has its own procedures.
None of the governments so far treats communities as future managers in the sense
that they can make their own choices from a range of options, each with their own
pros and cons. Nor do they train communities for all community management
aspects. Training is focused on technical tasks and book-keeping, and is mostly
given to men.
Experience with existing community managed water supply systems varies. In
Cameroon, 438 projects that were built and managed by the community showed a
breakdown rate of 9%, whereas many others built without community involvement
are no longer operational. Other reports indicate that a number of community
managed systems do not function well, partly for technical and ecological reasons,
and partly because of poor administration and lack of management training and
back-up support.
A considerable number of community members are not served because of poor
water distribution and poor network management. Several of these persons contributed to the construction of the system in cash or kind, but do not obtain the
benefits.
Although existing systems have technical, managerial and socioeconomic problems, the communities only mention the technical problems. The other problems
are revealed only after further probing and discussion.
Record-keeping of finances and of agreements made in meetings is very limited
and erodes the confidence of the community members. There is a similar weakness in communication and information-sharing which are mainly in the hands of
the local leadership.
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■
Many ESAs (external support agencies) stipulate preconditions for future management, usually the formation of a water committee with some women represented.
However, little is done in developing management tools or management training.
Another participatory evaluation of 40 community managed water systems in
Ecuador revealed that the systems do provide water but are in need of both technical
improvements and better management.
On the positive side, the above-mentioned PAR project already shows that working in
a horizontal way with the communities and helping them to clarify their problems is a
very powerful tool for change. Communities in Kenya, for example, were initially timid
but are now enthusiastic about the management of the water system, and are undertaking tasks in a transparent way. An overall picture is emerging that communities are capable of managing their water supply systems, but they need back-up support. The agencies
also clearly need support. Strategies and tools for enhancing management capacity in
communities are developed and tested in the project, which now offers a flexible support approach, called Participatory Action Development for community management.
This approach aims at responding to the concrete needs of communities related to the
management tasks and skills in their public services, and at finding solutions to problems
and conflicts in the management of rural water supply by communities.
4.3 “Revisiting” community management
Instead of trying to refine the existing definitions of community management or add
another version, there seems to be an easier way to increase our understanding of what it
encompasses. Community management deals with two dimensions: communities and
management, and the relation between them.
Communities are groups of people with common but also conflicting interests and
ideas and different socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. The identity of the people
in the communities is shaped by their history and their socioeconomic and environmental conditions. Some of them, often the economically better off, may be better informed
and know more about the world, but on the other hand, may have certain interests in
keeping the status quo and therefore may not be willing to solve certain problems. Women
may have different interests from men and their views may not have been heard in the
past, or their position may make it difficult to achieve changes on their own. Men, women
and children have different needs, different access to resources, and different areas in
which they can take decisions. Yet, all of them have equal rights to contribute to and
benefit from development activities, thus making it necessary to strike a gender balance
in programme activities, problem identification, conflict resolution, and joint management of common interests.
The water supply system may be one such common interest, but at the same time can
be a major source of conflict. This brings us to the dimension of management. Management is a concept which is very much being developed and is changing to entail sharing
of responsibilities in new ways. It is becoming more focused on learning, creating an
enabling environment, and building trust, and places strong emphasis on communication and holistic approaches. A collective learning process starts with dialogue, or an
open exchange of ideas in the group. This permits the participants to discover their
potential and perspectives. This dialogue differs from the more common discussion,
which has its roots with ‘percussion’ and ‘concussion’, literally a heaving of ideas back
and forth in a winner-takes-all competition. Team learning develops the skills of groups
of people to look beyond individual perspectives. It requires a positive learning environment. This is not easy, particularly in a politicized environment such as the water and
sanitation sector. Not only are good facilitation and a variety of techniques required, but
also leadership training for group members and a review of the historical developments
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with the community. Equally important is the need to review, with the sector staff, the
social missions of their institutions and their own aspirations. This requires building
confidence and trust, helping them to become self-confident and gain self-esteem. A
guide to this process was already provided in ancient China (c. 700 BC):
“Go to the people, live among them, learn from them, love them, start with what they
know, build on what they have. But of the best leaders when their task is accomplished,
their work is done, the people will remark: We have done it ourselves!”
The community is not the only actor, but can benefit from partnerships with water
sector institutions and the private sector. There is no blueprint on what the inputs of
different actors can be in the different project stages, but what may be expected is that
the role of the government or NGOs who were initially the project leaders will reduce
over time, and the role of the community water enterprise (water committee, users’ association, private enterprise, etc.) will increase. The different actors or their representatives thus have to come to an agreement on what the specific contributions and
responsibilities will be over a period of time. This they can only do on the basis of
informed decision-making which particularly addresses the expected service level, and
the long-term management of the system which is still the weakest issue today. The discussion may include possible future extensions of the system, not in great detail, but the
basic concept should be clear.
4.4 Some concluding remarks about community management
Although a paradigm shift seems to be emerging, the principal challenges to put
community management into mainstream practice are still huge. Currently in most
countries, community management of rural water supply systems is the accepted national
policy. However, there is still a considerable gap between policy and practice. In fact,
communities are not treated as future managers in the sense that they can make their
own choices from a range of options. Nor do they get the opportunity to learn the
required management skills.
This and the lack of back-up support for problems going beyond the community level
are important reasons for the sub-standard performance of many systems. This will continue to be the case unless the managerial aspects are better taken in hand and practical
management tools are developed together with communities. Management skills also
include handling of conflicts because communities consist of people who do not necessarily share the same interests and values. Often conflicting interests exist both within
the community and between the community and outsiders.
Gradually we see agencies starting to participate in the development endeavour of
the communities instead of the community participating in the agency’s projects. This
paradigm shift, however, will only materialize if new learning approaches and participatory methods are adopted in challenging institutional settings where community knowledge and institutional knowledge are equally valued and people start to respect each
other’s views.
The partnership approach, for agencies, means that new coherent strategies and
methods are needed to further build management capacity in the communities, and
through dialogues with them. This also implies that agencies need to make the necessary
adjustments and strengthen their own capacity to provide effective support to the
communities.
Also institutional change is needed which allows for harnessing the partnership
between communities, governments, NGOs and the private sector. The relationship should
be transparent, based on mutual understanding and appreciation of the different
‘social’ missions of the institutions.
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For a community to share management responsibilities to a greater degree, stakeholders should be allowed to learn about the system in all its aspects. Support strategies
should create sufficient learning opportunities and start a process of dialogue for all
involved. The challenge is how to make possible this continuous process, knowing that
‘each place, each culture, each experience requires its own approach’.
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Unit 4: Gender awareness
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To clarify the concept of gender and its importance in water supply and sanitation
projects
■ To raise awareness on how to develop and apply a gender approach for operation
and maintenance
➽ Methodology
1. Introduction
2. Exercise on the concept of gender
3. Focused discussion on the relevance of a gender approach
4. Interactive presentation on developing an O&M project with a gender approach
5. Group exercise on development of a gender approach
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Cards (thick paper)
✔ Flip chart
➽ Handouts
✔ Exercise sheets
✔ Copies of transparencies and background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introduction
The purpose of this session is to bring into the open the differences between women and
men, and to find solutions to problems of inequality based on mutual understanding. It
involves identifying gender differences and seeing how they led to inequalities of power,
which created obstacles for women’s full participation in the management of water
supply and sanitation programmes.
Some participants may be a little resistant in accepting gender equality because it
goes against their own attitudes towards men or women. One suggestion for overcoming
this resistance is to highlight examples in our daily lives where this issue has evolved
within the last decade or two.
Exercise on the concept of gender
The facilitator distributes one red card (representing men) and one blue card (representing women) to each participant, and asks a series of questions relating to O&M
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activities (see overhead sheet, page 182). For each activity, the group should indicate
with the cards whether they think men or women are more likely to be involved in this
activity.
At the end of the exercise, the facilitator asks the group to reflect on the issues and to
comment on any differences between men and women they observed (e.g. difference in
access to and control of resources, decision-making, working, etc.). The facilitator will
then help the group to make a definition of what gender is (see overhead sheet, page
183).
Focused discussion on the relevance of a gender approach
The facilitator asks the group, “Why is a gender approach relevant?” Their answers will
be written on the board. Disagreements may arise during the discussion, and the facilitator
should try to let the participants express their views, while keeping control of the time.
See overhead sheet (page 184) for some suggestions on this matter.
Interactive presentation on developing an O&M project with a gender approach
The facilitator can use the information contained in the overhead sheets or in the background information (see below) for an interactive presentation, but may find it opportune to invite a gender specialist to present his or her experiences in developing a project
with a gender perspective.
Group exercise on development of a gender approach
The participants should be divided into three small groups to deal with: a) a sanitation
project; b) a handpump project; c) a small piped system (or other project). Each subgroup is asked to develop the main points which are critical for the project, with the aim
of having sustainable operation and maintenance within the gender perspective. The
results are shared and discussed in a plenary session. Experience has shown that the
participants like to keep a record of the work they have been doing, so it is important to
organize secretarial support to help with this.
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3. Overhead sheets: Sheet 1
Exercise: Gender specificity
For each question, the participants respond by raising a red card
(men) or a blue card (women). If important differences arise within the
group, the facilitator should discuss the matter and ask for comments.
● Who makes the rules and regulations concerning the use of the
water point?
● Who ensures that these rules are observed by all users?
● Who keeps the water point and the surrounding area, including
the drain, in a good and clean condition?
● Who carries out immediate repairs to any small damage or leaks
to prevent major failures and more costly repairs?
● Who is responsible for regular maintenance (lubrication, cleaning
of mechanical parts)?
● Who reports any major failures immediately to those who are
responsible for big repairs?
● Who collects and keeps the money safely, while recording all
income and expenditures?
● Who makes the necessary payments for maintenance and
upkeep of the water point?
● Who reports to the community on how the money has been
spent?
● Who takes decisions within the Water Committee?
● Who contributes to the construction of the water supply system?
● Who contributes to the construction of a latrine?
● Who maintains the latrines?
● Who transports and stores the water?
● Who educates the children on proper hygiene behaviour?
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Overhead sheet 2
What is gender?
● Sex relates to the biological difference between a
man and a woman
● Gender relates to the social difference between a
man and a woman
● Gender does not relate only to women, but to
both women and men
● The gender approach optimizes the roles and
responsibilities of both men and women
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Overhead sheet 3
What is the relevance of
a gender approach?
● Users form an heterogeneous group
● Women have a keen and direct interest in water
supply, sanitation and hygiene
● Women stay in the community
● Men and women, by sharing the responsibilities,
decision-making and problem-solving, contribute
to a higher efficiency of the system
● Women transfer behaviour patterns to their
children
● The gender approach generates wider and more
specific participation of the community in the
project cycle
● The gender approach contributes to the
development of women
● The gender approach contributes to sustainability.
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Overhead sheet 4
Planning with a gender perspective
1. Participatory diagnosis of:
● the existing water supply and sanitation services within the
community
● health status by gender
● work division in households
● accessibility, use and control of water
● problems and constraints
● technical expertise among men and women
● the cultural elements and beliefs linked to water and
sanitation
● social participation in decision-making.
2. Consolidation of community organizations
● constitution of mixed committees
● active promotion of women in the committee
● discussion with the committee on problems relating to
participation and decision-making in a gender perspective
● revision of the election process of community members in
the committee.
3. Appropriate selection of technology
● technology adapted to the needs of men and women
(washing, etc.)
● technology using the knowledge and skills of both men and
women
● technology that can be maintained by men and women.
4. Operation and maintenance
● training for both men and women
● active and organized role in preventive maintenance.
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4. Background information1
4.1 Definitions
What is gender and what is a gender balance? Contrary to what is still stated in the literature, gender does not relate only to women, but to both women and men. As the Institute of Development Studies of the University of Sussex puts it, “The gender-based
approach is distinct in that it focuses on women and men, rather than considering women
in isolation.” In particular, a gender approach pays attention to:
■
■
■
■
differences between women’s and men’s interests, even within the same household, and how they are manifested;
the conventions and traditions determining men’s and women’s position in the
family, community and society at large, whereby women are usually dominated by
men;
differences among women and among men, based on age, wealth, ethnic background and other factors;
the way gender roles and relations change, often quite rapidly, as a result of
economic forces, migration for work, and other social trends.
4.2 Historical background
The fact that a gender approach is still often taken to mean only changes affecting women,
and not men, goes back to four decades ago. The first expression of concern for women
and their involvement in development emerged in the 1960s. Women were recognized
as a disadvantaged group, for whom special women’s components had to be developed.
In general projects, such as water supply, women were seen mainly as the beneficiaries of
the proposed improvements.
In the late 1970s and early 1980s, women began to be recognized as actors and managers in their own right, and it was demonstrated that involving women in planning,
construction and management of, e.g. water supply and sanitation services, brought
benefits for general development, for the projects, for the households, and for the women
themselves.
In the second half of the 1980s and early 1990s it became clear that the effective
involvement of women requires them to unite and develop strength and self-reliance.
This enables them to give direction to their lives and circumstances and encourages men
to look upon women’s participation not as competition, but as a natural right—the right
for women to deal with and make decisions on material and non-material resources which
are crucial to their lives. While women are the ones who do the physical work of transporting, digging, cleaning and caretaking, they have no say in the control of the resources on which their livelihood depends.
Carolyn Moser (1989) described four stages in the evolution of development
programmes: the welfare approach, the equity or anti-poverty approach, the efficiency
approach, and the empowerment approach. The welfare approach focuses exclusively on
women’s reproductive roles. It identifies women exclusively as mothers, wives and housewives. It sees the problem and its solution in the women themselves: if the women change
their domestic behaviour, better hygiene, health, nutrition, etc. will follow.
In contrast, the anti-poverty and efficiency approaches point out that besides being
mothers, wives and housewives, women are also economic producers and actors in the
public realm. During colonial and neo-colonial times these roles were not recognized
1
Most of this background information has been extracted from: Gender in water resources management, water supply and sanitation—
Roles and realities revisited, by Christine van Wijk-Sijbesma. The Hague, IRC, 1998 (Technical Paper Series No. 33-E).
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
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and the position of women was low. This resulted in a loss of status, as well as a loss of
income, and reduced the efficiency of projects.
The empowerment approach seeks to identify power, not in terms of domination, which
carries the assumption that a gain for women implies a loss for men, but rather in terms
of the rights of women, and of men, to make their choices in life and to influence the
direction of change. The approach challenges women to seek a new self-consciousness
and new positions in their countries’ legal and civil codes, economies, institutions and
management systems.
4.3 Elements for a gender analysis
For the formulation, assessment and review of policies, projects and programmes and
documents, such as the present literature review, the following six questions may form
the basis for the analysis of gender in water resources development and management:
1. In what way are men and women using the resource and for what purpose(s)?
2. How are the contributions to the development and management of water resources
(e.g. in labour, time, payments, and in kind) divided between men and women?
3. Who makes the decisions and who controls their implementation at the various
levels?
4. Who commands the project or programme resources, such as jobs and training?
5. Who gets the benefits and has control over these benefits, such as status, water,
products produced with this water, and income resulting from these products, and
who makes the decisions on how this income is used?
6. How are these attributes distributed among women and among men of different
wealth, ages, and religious and ethnic divisions? In other words, do some women
and men benefit more than others?
A gender approach analyses current gender divisions and strives for an equitable
balance between men and women of different ages and marital and socioeconomic
status, in terms of the following indicators:
■
■
■
■
■
■
access to information
amount of physical work
division of contributions in time and cash
degree of decision-making
access to resources and benefits: water, training, jobs, income
control over these resources and the benefits from them.
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4.4 Ways to overcome constraints to women’s participation
Activity
Mechanism
Project initiation
Programmes establish contacts with male leaders to get their
understanding and support for the participation of women.
Information and dialogue
Programmes use information channels and materials that also reach
women.
Meetings
Programmes encourage women to participate and to speak at project
meetings by:
■ fixing a time and place convenient for women and men
■ informing women about the meeting and inviting them to attend
■ making appropriate seating arrangements (not women at the back)
■ facilitating women to speak (use of vernacular language, discussion
breaks, choosing a spokeswoman, etc.)
■ having a separate meeting with women, where necessary.
Planning
Linking water and sanitation projects with economic and educational
development programmes.
Decision-making
Programmes enable women to participate in the following:
■ appointment of caretakers and mechanics
■ appointment of committee members
■ design and location of facilities
■ local management arrangements
■ local financing system.
Representation
Women choose their own representatives based on trust, easy contact,
leadership capacity, and feasibility (time and family permitting).
Management
Programmes build on women’s traditional tasks, skills and knowledge for
the following new roles in management (without in any way excluding
men):
■ management of water, waste and soil use
■ maintenance and repair of water points
■ hygiene education with other women
■ construction of latrines and monitoring maintenance and use
■ management of funds.
Training
Training women for technical and managerial tasks.
Making programme staff and management aware of the reasons for
equal participation and offering training to both women and men.
4.5 Gender and operation and maintenance
As a result of decentralization to the lowest appropriate level, many of the operation,
maintenance and repair tasks are now delegated to the communities. Owing to the strong
influence of gender perceptions and relations, these tasks have been regarded as purely
technical and a male prerogative.
Opinions that women cannot perform maintenance and repair tasks seem to be based
more on stereotyped gender concepts than on any real inability. Confronting such
gender stereotypes, Wijk (1985) quotes nine publications which demonstrate that women
may well make better maintenance and repair workers than men. The reasons advanced
are the direct concern and personal interest of women in their water supply; their regular visits to distribution points; the compatibility of preventive maintenance and user
education with women’s gender-specific tasks; the easier communication between female
maintenance staff and female users; women’s greater sensitivity to social pressure from
other women to do a good job; the importance of health aspects; the lower career orientation and labour mobility of women; and training of women in modern technology in
recognition of their age-old skills in management of their domestic water systems.
Recognizing the value of a gender approach, most programmes now involve women
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
189
in local maintenance. Here a distinction must be made between voluntary maintenance
jobs (‘caretaking’) and paid jobs (mechanics or similar functions). The following
patterns have been observed: a) both women and men are caretakers and both do the
same work; b) a man and a woman work as a caretaking team; c) only women are caretakers, while the men have the paid jobs of mechanic, etc.; and d) both women and men
are given paid jobs as mechanics, etc.
The more common situation is that women become voluntary caretakers of the
waterpoints in their neighbourhoods. As such they have mainly environmental and
preventive tasks: keeping the sites clean and dry, avoiding water pollution and wastage,
reducing misuse and vandalism, especially from children, diagnosing and reporting
problems. The work is mainly physical. Training, if given, tends to focus on health and
hygiene, rather than on technical know-how for early diagnosis and preventive maintenance.
In the last decade, women have had better opportunities to be trained for maintenance jobs that go beyond cleaning and reporting, and to be paid. In particular, women
handpump mechanics have become more prevalent. The effects of maintenance by women
on the one hand, and by men on the other, on the condition and performance of the
water system and on the workers themselves have not yet been extensively investigated.
4.6 Gender and management
In the past it was rare to see women working with men in organizing and managing their
domestic water supply services. This is now rapidly changing. Female members of local
management organizations are the result of appointments by local leaders or interventions by programme agencies. Alternatively, they have been chosen by the men and women
in the communities themselves. It is reported that women are more effective than men.
Female participation in management has produced many effects on the women and
men in the community. Recognition of women’s management tasks and training for new
tasks and skills have increased their status and self-confidence. Women in Visayayas in
the Philippines reported that their proposals on the time of meetings and on designs for
water supply and latrines are increasingly treated with respect. They now believe that
they can really contribute something for the good of the community and be ‘partners in
progress’ and not ‘for decorative purposes only’. Some believe they are no longer subordinate to the men. Male and female leaders welcome the role of women in development
based on women’s total capacities, though sometimes this is limited to traditional female
roles.
Some agencies promote the management of water supplies exclusively by women and
do not address male responsibilities and tasks. Sometimes, project agencies pay so much
attention to women’s as compared to men’s involvement that the service comes to be
seen as a women’s project, for which only the women are responsible. In such cases, the
projects cause women to carry the burden of a community water supply from which male
household members also profit, regardless of the women’s higher workload and fewer
resources. The decision to do it alone may, however, stem from necessity or choice.
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Unit 5: Cost recovery
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To review the key principles which influence sustainable cost recovery
■ To familiarize participants with financial arrangements, willingness to pay and financial management issues
➽ Methodology
1. Introduction
2. Lecture on the seven key principles of cost recovery
3. Exercise on financial arrangements
4. Working in pairs and discussion on willingness to pay
5. Group exercise on sound financial management
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Flip chart and markers
✔ Coloured cards (thick paper)
➽ Handouts
✔ Exercise sheets
✔ Copies of transparencies and background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introduction
This session highlights the main principles that lead to sustainable cost recovery, which
must be followed for the sustainable operation and maintenance of water supply and
sanitation services. The participants are asked whether cost recovery has been a problem
in their projects and, if so, to give examples.
The seven key principles influencing sustainable cost recovery
The facilitator, using the background information (see page 197) and overhead sheet
(page 192), should describe the seven key principles of sustainable cost recovery in a
short presentation.
Exercise on financial arrangements
Please refer to the overhead sheets (pages 193, 194). Each participant is given three
cards (thick paper) of different colours: yellow to represent the central government,
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
191
green to represent the municipality, and blue to represent the community. Other
colours can be added, if necessary. The facilitator puts up the overhead sheets and asks
the participants to assign the operational and financial responsibility for each task by
showing the appropriate card. If important differences or disagreements arise, the
facilitator should discuss and clarify the positions. The facilitator should, at the end of
the exercise, highlight the need to put into practice (e.g. with a contract) this division of
responsibilities.
Working in pairs on willingness to pay
The participants group themselves in pairs, and each pair discusses (for 10 minutes) the
factors that influence the users’ willingness to pay. The facilitator then invites individual
comments to be given freely, and makes clear any points that are not well understood by
the group. All opinions are written down by the facilitator who completes the list with
information provided in the overhead sheet (page 195) and in background information.
Group exercise on sound financial management
The facilitator divides the participants into two groups for an exercise on 1) water supply
(handpumps) and 2) water supply (piped system). Each group is given the exercise sheet
on sound financial management (page 196) and asked to fill in the Table. The results are
presented in plenary and discussed. The facilitator can use the information contained in
background information (see page 211).
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3. Overhead and exercise sheets: Sheet 1
Seven key principles to
sustainable cost recovery
1. Identifying the cost implications of the project’s
characteristics and the environment
2. Maximizing the willingness to pay
3. Clarifying financial responsibilities
4. Optimizing operation and maintenance costs
5. Setting an appropriate and equitable tariff
structure
6. Developing an effective financial management
system
7. Organizing access to alternative financial sources.
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
193
Exercise 1
Each participant is given three cards of different colours: yellow to represent the
central government; green to represent the municipality; and blue to represent
the community. (Other colours can be added, if necessary). The facilitator projects
an overhead sheet, asking participants to assign the operational and financial
responsibility for each task by voting with the cards. If there are important differences, the facilitator should start a discussion to clarify the positions.
O&M of borehole, diesel pump, storage and standpost system:
who is responsible?
(adapted from WASH Technical Report No.93)
O&M tasks
Operate the engine daily, safely and efficiently
Perform regular checks and adjustments (fuel, oil, filters,
belts, etc.)
Regularly replace the engine oil, filters and pump oil, if applicable
Perform regular checks and adjustments on the alternator,
starter, radiator, valves and injectors
Periodically carry out a complete overhaul of the engine, pumps
and associated equipment
Check all pipelines, tanks, and valves for leaks and breaks,
and repair them
Monitor standpost use to encourage proper use
Check all standposts for leaks, wear and tear, and repair if
needed
Flush all pipes periodically
Clean the standpost concrete aprons and drainage area,
and repair if needed
Test the water for microbiological contamination; if present,
locate and correct the source; disinfect
Measure the water output periodically at the well head and
standpost. Assess leakage and initiate leak detection and repairs
Carry out rehabilitation of the engine/pump
Record all operation and maintenance activities in the log book
Check the stocks of fuel and oil, ensuring proper storage
and security. Maintain a special fuel log
Check the stocks of parts, tools, and supplies
Establish historical records of all engines, pumps and other
equipment
Develop schedules for preventive maintenance and monitoring
Conduct effective vehicle maintenance
Operational
responsibility
Financial
responsibility
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Exercise 2
O&M administrative and support activities for most water supply
systems: who is responsible?
(adapted from WASH Technical Report No. 93)
Administrative and support tasks
Conduct technical and socioeconomic participatory studies
Analyse O&M tasks for use in planning and budgeting
Prepare annual budgets and long-term financial estimates
Select and appoint operators/contractors for O&M
Develop and evaluate technical and management training for
water system operators
Provide ongoing technical training for operators
Delegate task responsibilities, supervise and pay salaries
Keep archives, inventories and log books
Develop and evaluate financial and management training for
community managers
Provide ongoing financial and management training for
community managers
Collect water fees and manage revenues
Make payments for purchases, loans and other obligations
Respond to users’ complaints
Organize and conduct general meetings for discussions,
elections, etc.
Develop information and materials on hygiene education
Organize community contributions for upgrading or extending
the system
Report urgent problems to the government agency
Provide technical and management support to community
managers
Collect, analyse and monitor the results, and conduct follow-up
support or training, if necessary
Operational
responsibility
Financial
responsibility
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195
Overhead sheet 2
Factors influencing willingness to pay
● Demand and participation from communities
● Service level
● Service standard
● Perceived benefits
● Relationship to production
● Level of income
● Price of water
● Relative costs
● Opportunity cost of time
● Characteristics of existing sources
● Reputation of service agency
● Community cohesion
● Policy environment
● Sociocultural factors
● Perception of ownership and responsibility
● Transparency of financial management
● Institutional support.
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Exercise 3
Sound financial management
Financial management issues
What costs to budget for?
What sources of income to use?
How to collect the money?
When to collect the money?
Who collects the money?
Where to keep the money?
How to register movements
of expenditures and incomes?
How to pay the mechanic or caretaker?
Who administers the funds?
What are the funds used for?
Who orders payments?
What type of financial control?
How to monitor?
What to do with bad payers?
This question should also be asked
when public administrations do not pay.
Possible options
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4. Background information
“Lack of money” is often claimed to be a principal constraint to providing water and
sanitation services. In many cases, the problem is not only the lack of money but also
mismanagement of resources and a reluctance to pay for the service.
Some explanation is needed of the terms “efficiency”, “effectiveness” and “equity”.
Financial management should be efficient in the same way that the ratio between inputs
(revenues) and outputs (expenditures) should be satisfactory. Effectiveness measures the
contribution of a project towards its objectives and results, and therefore costeffectiveness measures the costs involved in order to reach a particular objective or
result. Equity measures how the costs and benefits are distributed among beneficiaries,
and how they are sustained over a prolonged period of time.
The present trend to decentralize operational, managerial and financial responsibilities at local level has dramatically increased the need to design and plan for water supply
services which the communities can sustain financially. The effectiveness and credibility
of both government sector strategies and development cooperation policies can be at
stake if this issue is not addressed urgently.
“Water is an economic and social good, and this service has to be paid for, since it has
costs”. Although this statement is now admitted by many countries, in a number of rural
areas water is still considered to be nature’s gift or a free service provided by the government. It is therefore necessary to convince rural populations that a water supply service
has costs. In addition, certain financial issues have to be addressed early in the project
design, such as: Should all costs be covered? Who is financially responsible? How to
organize financial arrangements?
In the light of major current trends and past trials, an efficient, effective, equitable
and sustainable plan for cost recovery of a community water supply service is based on
seven key factors which are mutually dependent:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Identifying the cost implications of the project
Maximizing the willingness to pay
Clarifying the financial responsibilities
Optimizing operating and maintenance costs
Setting an appropriate and equitable tariff structure
Developing an effective financial management system
Organizing access to alternative financial sources.
4.1 Identifying the implications of the project and the environment on cost recovery
The way the project has been set up, and its institutional and legal characteristics are
elements that can have a direct implication on cost recovery, particularly with regard to
the following:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Technology selection
Community aspects
Management options
Policies at local, regional and national levels
Support to the community and/or the municipality
Economic environment.
Technology selection
Appropriate technology selection is a key factor in sustainable cost recovery. The ratio
between capital and recurrent costs can be the determining factor, in the way that a
technology with higher capital costs could be chosen because of lower O&M costs. There-
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fore, when communities select a technology for their water and sanitation service with
external support, they must have clear information about the costs and charges.
Communities should be aware of the financial implications of choosing a particular
technology.
Community aspects
The demand by, and the participation of the community are key elements that influence
the community’s willingness to assume financial responsibility for the system. However,
the issue of paying charges should also be examined. Other matters for consideration
include the availability of materials and spare parts within the community; whether skilful artisans work in or close to the community and the price of their interventions; how
the community is organized and how responsibilities are distributed between men and
women.
Management options
The management system chosen for O&M can directly influence the way cost recovery
will be organized. For instance, the water supply system can be managed by a village
water committee, an inter-village association, a private person or firm operating under a
contractual arrangement, the municipality operating directly or indirectly with its own
staff or through community committees, or by a private organization. Each of these will
have different interests and capacities, and will determine the rules for managing the
finances accordingly.
Policies at local, regional and national levels
In some countries, the national sector’s policy is to increase the share of private capital,
which requires total recovery of the costs within the framework of the law. Tariffs set at
national level can include subsidies for poorer people. In other countries, the government policy is for the community and the municipality to arrange the tariff structures
and the level of cost recovery. The municipality, being the level nearest to the community, has the possibility of creating its own regulations and tariffs for public services like
water supply and sanitation.
Support to the community or the municipality
In many cases, the communities will need training in book-keeping and financial management, and may have to discuss with the local authorities when major problems arise.
They may need support from professionals coming from the private sector.
Economic environment
Some countries are now going through an important economic crisis with inflation,
exchange rate fluctuations and other problems, which are likely to have an impact on
any kind of cost recovery mechanism.
4.2 Maximizing the willingness to pay (WTP)
Factors influencing WTP
Willingness to pay, as an expression of the community’s demand, is a strong prerequisite
for the financial sustainability of a water supply system. WTP, which is a useful yardstick
for assessing project feasibility, depends on a number of factors which are presented in
the Table below.
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199
COMMUNITY FACTORS
Demand and participation of communities
A project which is initiated on a community’s request and demand, and in which the community has been involved from the beginning, is less likely to have problems with WTP.
Level of income
Income and WTP are related. However, it can happen that abilities to pay and WTP are not correlated. Indeed, water is such an
essential good, that poor communities are sometimes paying a higher price.
Community cohesion
In rural areas in particular, cost recovery may be managed through voluntary contributions to a common fund. Cohesion within the
community is essential, but cannot be taken for granted. Lack of trust or conflicts between members may reduce cooperation,
irrespective of felt needs, and may also affect collection systems and tariffs.
Sociocultural factors
Sociocultural practices and traditions may influence WTP, particularly in certain locations. For example, where water is considered a
sacred ‘gift from God’, there may be resistance to payment.
Perception of ownership and responsibility
Ownership or a high degree of community involvement in water supply services may facilitate WTP, because to be in control instils
pride, encourages responsibility, and may result in increased WTP for the service. Also to be taken into account are a history of
government involvement in water service provision and ineffective consultations in the past.
SERVICE FACTORS
Service level and standard
Communities are looking for a service that will respond to their desire for comfort and convenience. There is also evidence to
suggest that low-income groups are prepared to pay significant amounts for basic service levels.
Price
The price level is likely to affect consumers’ willingness to pay for an improved service, as against continuing with the existing supplies. A
balance is required between establishing a price that both covers the costs and relates to what people are prepared to pay.
Relative costs
Consumers may compare the cost of a service to other services, e.g. schooling or power supplies as benchmarks for measuring
the relative costs of water supply. If the relative costs are too high for water supply, WTP may be reduced.
Reputation of service agency
The credibility of a service agency will affect WTP. The service agency (public, private, or community institution) must be able to
deliver the expected service.
Transparency of financial management
Transparency may be closely linked to the reputation of the service agency or local management organization and is often a matter
of trust. Where user contributions are clearly accounted for, consumers will be motivated to continue these payments and WTP will
not be affected.
FACTORS LINKED TO THE BENEFITS FROM IMPROVED SERVICE
Perceived benefits
WTP is dependent on the benefits to be gained; the extent to which these are perceived by consumers is important. Agencies and
communities may not share the same perception of benefits; variations also exist within communities, often linked to who stands to
gain more. An awareness of these subtle differences in consumer preferences is central to developing a sustainable programme.
Relationship to production
Where water use can be linked to productive activities or income-generating activities, e.g. garden irrigation or livestock watering, WTP is
likely to be elevated. Again, the improved supply must be able to deliver this advantage to a greater extent than it did before.
Opportunity cost of time
This is the value attached to time, compared to its next best use, e.g. productive activities. The value attached to this time may
influence WTP and the extent to which the improved source of supply may save time. The value attached to time may be perceived
differently within communities, and within households (i.e. between men and women). The time spent daily and the physical effort in
collecting water can influence the WTP.
Characteristics of existing sources
Where users consider their existing sources as acceptable, they are unlikely to be willing to pay for an improved service. Variables
including perceived quality, reliability of supply, and distance from home will influence the WTP for an improved supply.
INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS
Policy environment
Policies of providing water in rural areas free of charge, or well below cost, may influence WTP since consumers may equate water
services with public assistance. Although these policies are being revised, new policies may not be clearly communicated and
applied consistently.
Adapted from P. Evans, Paying the piper. The Hague, IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, 1992 (IRC Occasional Paper No. 18).
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As can be seen in the above Table, WTP may have a strong affinity with a range of
cultural, social and institutional factors that complicate the efforts to measure it.
Decision-making by consumers may not follow rational economic norms and consumers
may reveal their own, location-specific preferences in source selection.
Measuring the willingness to pay
Indirect measures
The above-mentioned factors can be assessed by means of socioeconomic surveys or
monitored throughout a project. They will provide some trends in the willingness to pay,
but are not always totally correlated.
Direct measures
One way to measure the willingness to pay at the start of a project is to assess the direct
financial contribution of communities for the construction and investment of a water
supply service or sanitation facility. This contribution could diminish over time. However, measuring WTP by the amount of money that people are paying for the construction and investment of a water supply system is not suitable because the community may
be willing but unable to pay. Another direct way of measuring WTP is to calculate the
percentage of payments received, to the total payments due. The lower the percentage,
the lower the WTP. In this case, the results do not give any information about the reasons
why people decide to contribute or not (high or low WTP). Direct measures have this
problem.
Hypothetical behaviour studies
An alternative approach to estimation of benefits is to ask users what would be their
choice of service available at a specified price. This is called the contingent valuation (CV)
method, since user responses are contingent, or dependent, on predetermined conditions. Traditional water-demand models are used to estimate the benefits via a demand
function for the supply from market data, and to derive from it an individual’s maximum
willingness to pay. Price and demand elasticity ratios can be determined. Lack of available data and non-rational economic behaviours in rural areas are severe constraints to
this approach.
The bidding game method is a negotiation between the interviewer and respondent,
moving within a range of potential prices for a water supply improvement until bidding
settles at a final value. The summation of WTP bids for all the households served by a
project is an estimate of the total benefits of a project and can be compared with the
costs of the project to decide whether the investment is justified. Probability models
derived from the bidding game describe the probability that a particular family will use a
new water source. This method causes some problems because responses could be influenced in some way by the interviewer. The answers about WTP are always around the first
price mentioned or starting point of the survey. The referendum method is more suitable
because people act as they do in a market place (with a given price, they decide whether
to buy or not).
Actual behaviour study
Actual behaviour studies assess the present payment behaviour of consumers, such as
cash payment to vendors (which could indicate a good level of WTP), direct cost savings,
indirect cost savings (calories, time, money). Time spent for collecting water and the
effort and hardship to collect the water are often used as a measure of WTP. One problem is that the actual behaviour assessment requires a long period of study because it is
difficult to know what people will do, and it requires considerable expertise.
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201
Optimizing the relationship with users/consumers
Optimizing WTP requires a strong link with users and consumers. The link between
users and the water enterprise (or water committee) relies on a proper information flow
on both sides. Consumers have the right to know about the quality of service (pressure,
quantity, tariffs structures, adjusting tariffs, financial aspects, contracts, etc.); and the
enterprise (or water committee) has the obligation to resolve the user’s complaints and
keep them informed. The following questions are related to optimizing the relationship
between users and the water enterprise:
■
■
■
■
Does the enterprise have a mechanism to deal with consumer’s complaints?
Does the enterprise give complete information to users about the water service?
How does the enterprise get to know the users’ opinions about the level of service?
Does the enterprise have indicators to measure the quality of the service provided
to users? How are these indicators used?
4.3 Clarifying financial responsibilities
Who is responsible?
There is a tendency today to ask communities to contribute to the initial investment
costs, as a way of strengthening their financial responsibility and future willingness to
pay. This contribution can represent 5–20% of the total investment costs, which are composed of financial contributions as well as labour and available local materials. Costsharing can be arranged between the community and the local/national government
agency in order to cover the full cost. This arrangement will have to be formalized in a
contract in which all parties have obligations. Financial responsibilities are very often
linked with operational responsibilities, as shown in the Table below:1
O&M OF HANDPUMPS: WHO IS RESPONSIBLE?
(adapted from WASH Report No. 93)
O&M tasks
Operational
responsibility
Financial
responsibility
Monitor handpump use and encourage proper use
Community
Community
Check all nuts and bolts, and tighten if necessary
Community
Community
Check and adjust pump handle and stuffing box
Community
Community
Grease or oil all hinge pins, bearings, or sliding parts
Community
Community
Clean the pump, well head, concrete apron, and drainage area
Community
Community
Check well head, concrete apron, drainage area, repair cracks
Community
Community
Measure output per stroke and compare with expected output
Community
Community
Disassemble the pump, check drop pipe, cylinder, leathers, and foot
valve. Check corrosion and wear. Repair or replace if necessary.
Community and
local mechanic
Community
Conduct other well, handpump or apron repairs if necessary
Community and
local mechanic
Community
Repaint handpump periodically, as necessary
Community
Community
Conduct water test for microbiological contamination
Government
Government
In case of contamination, locate and correct source of contamination,
and disinfect
Mechanic or
government agency
Community and
government
Conduct water-level check and well-yield test. Adjust cylinder setting if necessary
Government agency
Government
1
Adapted from: S. Fry. Helping communities manage their finance—a manual for extension personnel working in rural or peri-urban communities. Arlington, VA, WASH Project of the U.S. Agency for International Development, 1993 (WASH Technical Report No. 93).
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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Record all operation and maintenance activities in notebook
Community
Manage a stock of spare parts, tools and supplies on site
Community, local mechanic, private
sector and government
Replace entire handpump when fully worn
Community
Local mechanic,
private sector or
government agency
Community and
government
Operational
responsibility
Financial
responsibility
Ensure protection of spring
Community
Community
Check spring box for leaks and cracks, and repair if necessary
Community
Community
Community and
private contractor
Community
Community
Community
Community and
private contractor
Community
Flush all pipelines periodically
Community
Community
Clean standpost concrete apron(s) and drainage area(s)
Community
Community
Check standpost concrete and drainage area, and repair if needed
Community
Community
Community and
private contractor
Community
or government
Government
Government
In case of contamination, locate and correct the problem and disinfect lines
Private contractor
or government
Community and
government
Measure water output periodically, at spring and standpost, and assess leakage
Community and
private contractor/
government
Community and
government
In case of high leakage, initiate leak detection and repair
Community and
private contractor/
government
Community and
government
Record all operations and maintenance activities in log book
Community
Community
Manage a stock of parts, tools, and supplies
Community, local mechanic, private
sector and government
O&M OF GRAVITY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM: WHO IS RESPONSIBLE?
(adapted from WASH Report No. 93)
O&M tasks
Check all pipelines and valves for leaks or breaks, and repair
Monitor standpost use to encourage proper use
Check all standposts for leaks, wear and tear, and make repairs
Conduct repairs on spring box, lines, and standpost if necessary
Conduct water test for microbiological contamination
Rehabilitate spring box/pipelines/standposts
Local mechanic, private
sector, government
Community and
government
O&M OF BOREHOLE, DIESEL PUMP, STORAGE AND STANDPOST SYSTEM: WHO IS RESPONSIBLE?
(adapted from WASH Report No. 93)
O&M tasks
Operational
responsibility
Financial
responsibility
Operate engine daily, safely and efficiently
Community
Community
Perform regular checks and adjustments (fuel, oil, filters, belts)
Community
Community
Regularly replace engine oil, filters and pump oil if applicable
Community
Community
Perform regular checks and adjustments on alternator, starter, radiator,
valves and injectors
Community,
private contractor,
government agency
Community or
government
Periodically conduct complete overhaul of engine, pumps and
associated equipment
Community, private
contractor, agency
Community or
government
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
203
Check all pipelines, tanks, valves for leaks/breaks, and repair
Community
Community
Monitor standpost use to encourage proper use
Community
Community
Check all standposts for leaks, wear and tear, and repair if needed
Community
Community
Flush all pipes periodically
Community
Community
Clean standpost concrete aprons and drainage area, and repair
Community
Community
Conduct water test for microbiological contamination; locate and
correct source of contamination; disinfect
Government
Government
Measure water output periodically, at well head and standpost. Assess
leakage and initiate leak detection, and repair if needed
Community,
contractor
Community and
government
Contractor and
government
Community and
government
Record all operation and maintenance activities in log book
Community
Community
Manage a stock of fuel and oil, ensuring proper storage and security
Maintain special fuel log
Community
Community
Manage stock of parts, tools, and supplies
Community, local mechanic, private
sector and government
Conduct well engine/pump rehabilitation
Establish historical records of all engines, pumps, etc.
Develop schedules for preventive maintenance and monitoring
Conduct effective vehicle maintenance
Government
Government
Community and
government
Community and
government
Government
Government
O&M ADMINISTRATIVE & SUPPORT ACTIVITIES FOR MOST WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS: WHO IS RESPONSIBLE?
(adapted from WASH Report No. 93)
Administrative and support tasks
Operational
responsibility
Financial
responsibility
Conduct technical and socioeconomic participatory studies
Government and
community
Government
Analyse O&M tasks for use in planning and budgeting
Government and
community
Government
Prepare annual budgets and long-term financial estimates
Community and
government
Community and
the government
Select and appoint operators/contractors for O&M
Community and
technical adviser
Community
Develop and evaluate technical and management training for water
system operators
Government and
community
Government
Provide ongoing technical training for operators
Government and
community
Government and
the community
Delegate task responsibilities, supervise and pay salaries
Community
Community
Keep archives, inventories and log books
Community
Community
Develop and evaluate financial and management training for
community managers
Government and
community
Government and
community
Provide ongoing financial and management training for
community managers
Government and
Community
Government and
community
Collect water fees and manage revenues
Community
Community
Make payments for purchases, loans and other obligations
Community
Community
Respond to users’ complaints
Community
Community
Organize and conduct general meetings for discussions, elections, etc.
Community
Community
Government and
community
Government
Community
Community
Develop information and materials on hygiene education
Organize community contributions for upgrading or extending the system
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204
Report urgent problems to government agency
Community
Community
Provide technical and management support to community managers
Private sector or
government
Private sector or
government
Collect, analyse, monitor results, and conduct follow-up support or
training if necessary
Community and
government
Community and
government
4.4 Optimizing operation and maintenance costs
Costs need to be identified, estimated and analysed, and communities should be informed
about them in order to be fully aware of the implications in choosing a particular technology.
What are the costs?
Investment costs (Capital)
■
■
■
■
■
■
Pre-feasibility study, project design, social work
Equipment, materials, parts and tools
Construction costs
Human resource development, training
Institutional capacity building
Sometimes capital costs include the metering and connection costs and the return of the investment
Recurrent costs (operation and maintenance)*
■ Materials (consumable chemicals, energy, tools, spare parts and equipment)
■ Works personnel (operation, maintenance, routine preventive maintenance, routine repairs, unanticipated
repairs, construction for minor rehabilitation)
■ Management personnel (planning, supervision, financial management, administration, monitoring)
■ Follow-up (training support, technical assistance, institutional strengthening, monitoring and evaluation)
■ Financial costs (interest, amortization, depreciation, exchange rate variations, inflation)
■ Environmental costs (water source protection and conservation, wastewater treatment)
■ Other costs (transport, services paid to a private contractor) (unaccounted-for water, both due to leakage in
system and bad administration, and vandalism; they become a cost to the community if not prevented)
Future investment costs
■ Construction for major rehabilitation, replacement, extension
* Recurrent expenditures comprise fixed costs such as annualized financing costs or water source protection fees, and
variable recurrent costs according to output and other factors such as physical conditions.
How to estimate O&M costs
There are usually no difficulties in estimating investment costs. However, the case is different for recurrent costs. Using the experience from other similar projects, although
useful, can be misleading because the recurrent costs vary widely from one project to
another, in terms of what has been included in their calculation. Basic recurrent costs
can be measured in the following way:
Basic recurrent costs estimation
1. List all O&M activities needed, and their frequency.
2. According to each activity, list all human resources, materials, spare parts, energy,
tools and equipment required.
3. Estimate the quantity or volume needed for each requirement.
4. Define the activity cost.
5. Sum up all costs of all activities.
This basic recurrent costs estimation does not include such elements as depreciation,
replacement costs, initial capital reimbursement, training costs, environmental protection costs, etc. Depending on the strategy and policy of the project, these additional costs
may have to be added.
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
205
Minimizing costs
An important aspect of costs analysis is how to optimize or reduce O&M costs. Costs can
be significantly reduced in the following ways:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
choosing a technology with inexpensive spare parts and/or inexpensive operating
costs
reducing the transport costs to go and buy spare parts and chemicals (making
spare parts more accessible and available)
reducing dependence on chemical use (alternative water treatment technology
for instance, such as multi-stage filtration system)
reducing dependence on fuel or electric consumption (solar energy, gravity)
firmly installing a maintenance culture within the community and professional
staff
organizing preventive maintenance activities where users are also involved
installing systematic leakage control
applying economies of scale for larger systems (reduces costs for the consumer)
applying a control for unaccounted-for water (because of both leakage and bad
management)
installing proper administrative and financial control mechanisms.
Identifying the benefits of water supply projects
Benefits associated with a project intervention refer to a wide range of outcomes like:
1. Health: reduction in water-washed diseases, reduction in water-borne diseases, fewer
days of work and school lost due to illness, less money spent on medical care.
2. Social: may stimulate the community to take up other, unrelated projects in environmental health, time gains, position of women.
3. Economic and financial: cash saving (new system replaces water vending and delivers
water at the lowest cost), improvements in agriculture, external sources attracted into
the village.
4. Institutional: institutions will be created or strengthened by reorganization of agency
structures.
4.5 Setting an appropriate and equitable tariff structure
Strategies for costs recovery
Optimum allocation of resources
Tariffs are used primarily to recover costs and achieve financial sustainability, but also for
efficient allocation of scarce sector resources, equitable income and benefits distribution, and fiscal viability.
Equity
Designing a tariff requires that one keeps in mind equity, affordability and willingness to
pay. Equity in the sense that all members of the community, rich/poor, men/women,
have equal access to the benefits of the improved water supply service. O&M costs can
only be recovered from users if they are both able and willing to pay for a water supply. It
is generally admitted that people should not have to pay more than 3–5% of their
income for water and sanitation services (affordability criteria). A higher percentage of
income expended on water will mean other important needs may not be fully met. Great
care is therefore required when setting users’ tariffs and contributions.
Regulation of demand
Water tariffs can be designed to regulate the demand for water, based on the assumption
Sensitivity analysis
Deals with estimating the expected outcome of the project according to different scenarios.
Marginal cost analysis
Deals with the cost of additional outputs or inputs in a project or programme. Marginal refers to
additional to what is already done. A typical question is: Will the additional inputs result in sufficient
additional outputs?
Least cost analysis
Uses estimation methods to measure the costs of an alternative or different possible outcome.
Planning
Planning
Planning
Planning—Evaluation
Implementation—Monitoring—Evaluation
Cost-effectiveness analysis
Expressed as the ratio of the costs (quantified) versus the effects (not necessarily quantified in monetary
terms). The definition of effectiveness and effects can be difficult and is often subjective.
Cost utility analysis
Expressed as the ratio of costs versus outcomes (not necessarily in monetary terms), while the outcomes
are ranked. This is similar to the perceived cost-benefit analysis (ratio) where the group of users, often
divided into men and women, rich/poor, or different ethnic groups, identify the level of benefits and costs
for themselves from a system or project. From their own perspective, they answer the question: Are the
benefits greater than the costs?
Planning—Evaluation
Cost-benefit analysis
Expressed as a ratio of costs versus the outcomes in terms of benefits, quantified in monetary terms.
This can be difficult to calculate, especially when trying to quantify benefits such as health improvements.
Planning—Monitoring—Evaluation
Monitoring
Cost recording
Registration of expenditures in books. If costs are grouped by category, it is possible to do
more accurate analysis.
Cost comparisons
Comparing the costs, e.g. of facilities, life-span of materials, construction, different project alternatives.
Applications in the project cycle
Cost analysis tools
OVERVIEW OF VARIOUS COST ANALYSIS TOOLS AND OF THEIR RELEVANCE TO COMMUNITY-BASED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Moderately complex
Complex
Complex
Complex
Complex
Very complex
Simple
Simple
Complexity
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MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
207
that consumers have rational behaviour, and that the higher the price, the lower the
consumption (called price elasticity). However, this “rational” behaviour is possible when
there are substitutes, or alternative goods for water. What is the alternative to water?
Certainly not Coca-Cola or beer. Price elasticity is very low in low-income areas, meaning
that people will need to acquire water whatever the price. However, in higher income
areas, price elasticity can be higher, and consumption patterns can be influenced by
price differentiation.
Agreements on costs to be recovered
While setting up a tariff structure, one should specify what costs need to be covered,
since some costs might be covered by other financial mechanisms (see below), or determine which other organizations and institutions are responsible. Should wastewater treatment and sanitation be included in the tariff? Should the tariff only cover short-term
O&M costs? Should the tariff cover the estimated unaccounted-for water? The answer to
these questions will depend on the policies and strategies of the government and the
arrangements between the community and the municipality for costs recovery.
Who manages the tariffs?
It is also important to specify to whom the tariff will be paid, as it can be paid to a water
committee, an operator, or to the local authority. Or is water vending the most appropriate option to be considered? Water re-vending might double or triple the original price,
as happens in some low-income urban areas where there are no other alternatives to safe
drinking-water supply than water sold by re-vendors. Setting up a tariff should be done
with and by the community, as it will allow the community to bear the full responsibility
of applying the decisions made and as it will be better accepted since the community
knows why this tariff was fixed as it is. However, project and support staff should assist the
community in the calculation of financial feasibility of a tariff design and user charges. It
is inevitable that overtime tariff levels and structure have to be revised as a result of
demand patterns, changing costs structure, inflation, and the need for increased funds
for major expansion. Delays in adjustments can have serious consequences for financial
sustainability. It is therefore appropriate to review the tariff levels and structure at least
once a year for piped schemes and once every two years for others. However, water rates
are often a local political issue, and political considerations may overrule financial
balances.
Gender considerations
Gender differences and inequalities affect water resource management:
■
■
■
■
■
access and control over resources (men and women have unequal access and control over water and other resources including land, time and credit);
household responsibilities (women shoulder more work than men in the home,
including managing domestic water supplies);
productive use of water;
priorities for development and management of water resources;
bargaining power and decision-making (including participation in community-based
organizations and governing structures).
User classification
User class designations will depend on the complexity of the service provided and on any
special administrative or legal requirements. Each utility decides on the number and
designation of user classes, but almost every utility will have the following categories: a)
residential; b) commercial; c) industrial; d) institutional; e) government; f) wholesale.
PART 2. COURSE CONTENTS
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Should water be metered or not?
For water metering
Against water metering
Regular income
Equity
Reduction of water waste
Only one parameter: cost per m3
Technical control of the system
Accounting made easier
High installation costs
Meters need maintenance and repairs
Vandalism
Long delays in payment
Heavy administrative procedures for billing
Needs personnel for meter reading
Options for charges
There are different options for regular charges: non-metered flat rates; non-metered
graded rates, block rates, metered rates, and mixed system rates.1
Non-metered flat rates
In a flat rate system, each user household pays a fixed amount of money, regardless of
the volume of water used. In its simplest form, the total amount of money needed for the
upkeep of the improved water supply system is divided equally over the number of households using the system. Payment may be per month, per season, or per year, depending
on what is most convenient for the users of the service. Flat rates are easy to organize with
private taps or group connections. In these cases it is clear who is the user and who is not.
Families, who live at a distance or who have their own water source may object having to
pay the same amount as those who live close to the tap. Adjustments should be made
accordingly. Major disadvantages of non-metered flat rates are: a) they are not equitable
in the sense that low-income households pay the same amount as the better-off, whatever
the consumption; and b) they do not discourage waste of water. They are, however, easy
to administer.
Non-metered graded rates
Users and households are classified into several categories, based on estimated differences in water use and income. The advantage of non-metered graded rates is that they
take into account the consumption level and payment capacity of users, and therefore
could reach a more equitable tariff structure. It is also a way to account for rough estimations of consumption volume, without investing in a metering system. The introduction
of graded rates is easiest when clear and valid indicators of water use and income level
can be found (land, herds, size of house). An alternative system to graded rates is to raise
a levy on cash crops on top of already existing rates, which will be used for the maintenance of the water supply system. However, disputes may arise over the basis for grading,
as some people may feel they have not been favoured.
Block rates
Apart from a basic rate which is fixed with reference to affordability by the poor, other
consumers are charged according to the volume consumed, e.g. 0–10 m3; 10–20 m3, etc.
It is sometimes argued that the block rates should be declining because of possible economies of scale. It is doubtful, however, that there are such significant economies of scale
per consumer basis. Considering the growth in services needed in developing countries,
the most appropriate policy is an increasing block structure, with progressively increasing tariffs.
1
Adapted from: C. van Wijk. What price water? The Hague, IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, 1989 (IRC Occasional
Paper Series No. 10).
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
209
Metered rates
While graded rates based on social and financial indicators have the advantage that they
avoid the introduction of complex metered connections, water meters enable the charges
to be made according to the actual volume consumed. If properly enforced, metering
induces users to avoid wasting water, which may help reduce long-term costs or
unaccounted-for water losses. Individual household meters are not only expensive to
install, they also need to be read regularly, which adds to the work of the administration.
Staff will have to read the meters, send out bills and accept payments. Metering therefore
requires sufficient administrative and management capacities. The added cost of installing and operating meters, as well as billing and collection may outweigh the benefits of
the system, notably in rural areas. In practice, often a proxy is used, such as pipe diameter, number of connections, or the container size (where purchased from vendors). A
major constraint to user participation in piped systems with metered connections is the
high connection fee which water agencies charge to individual households wishing to
install a private tap. One way to alleviate this problem is to spread the connection fee
over a period of time, which can then be included with the monthly water bill.
Mixed system
Another option to cover the recurrent costs of a community water scheme is to combine
paid private connections with free public standposts. When there are enough private
connections, it becomes possible for their payments to cover the cost of public taps for
the lowest income groups. However, households which can afford to take a house connection may not always do so, when there are enough free standposts. There should be
increasing public awareness about this system, with information to promote private tap
connections.
Establishing a tariff
Defining the scope of a tariff
Definitions 1
Operation, maintenance and administration costs = functioning costs (f. c.)
Approximation of replacement and extension costs = 25% of functioning costs
Funds for the recovery of investment costs = RIC
Minimum tariff = Functioning costs per month
Number of households
When such a tariff is chosen, it is important to consider with the community how to cover the other
costs. Various options are possible (see page 212: alternative financing).
Real cost tariff = Functioning costs + repl. & ext. costs =
Number of households
Total cost tariff = (1.25 x f.c.) + recovery of invest. costs =
Number of households
(1.25 x f.c.)/month
No. of households
(1.25 x f.c.) + RIC
No. of households
Efficient tariff = (1.25 x f.c.) + RIC + depreciation (including provision for risks and inflation)
Number of households
1
Adapted from course material: Gestion para la sostenbilidad en programas de agua potable y saneamiento [Management for sustainability
of water supply and sanitation programmes]. CINARA and IRC, unpublished material, 1994–97.
Example of tariff setting for a piped scheme in a rural area
10,000
[50,000/15 + 110,000/25 + 60,000/15 + 50,000/15 +
12,000/10 + 160,000/15]/12
∑ (IV/LC)/12
[HP x 0.746] x hours per day x 30 days x price per KW
Amortization per month
Energy costs per month
6,647/600
6,043 + 570
11.07
6,647
604
6,043
942
2,610
233
28
11,011
1,780
900
Result in pesos (rounded)
In this case, the tariff will be 11.7 pesos (or 12 pesos) per month per capita. It should be noted that these costs are only based on an average month. It can be that for certain months, the costs will
be higher than for other months. All unspent funds should be saved for the future. The same methodology can be applied for handpumps, although much more simple. A decision has to be made
beforehand on how to recover investment and replacement costs, as well as unforeseen costs. In this case, the decision was made to include amortization and a contingency fund.
Total costs per month/No. families
Tariff/family/month
6,043 x 10 %
10% of the monthly O&M costs
Sum O&M costs + contingency costs
(900 + 1,780 + 28 + 233 + 2,160 + 942)
Sum of all above costs (amortization + energy +
lubricants + treatment + personnel + maintenance)
Total O&M costs/month
Contingency fund
[50,000x2% + 110,000 x 1% + 60,000 x 1% + 50,000 x 1% +
10,000 x 1% + 160,000 x 5%]/12
∑ (IV x maintenance %)/12
Total costs per month
(30 + 22 + 35.00) x 30
Salary/day x 30 days
Personnel costs/month
Maintenance costs
2 x 14
[10 x 3,600 x 12 x 30]/[0.5 x 1,000,000] x 9
2 litres/month x price/litre
[Debit x 3,600s. x hours per day x 30 days]/
[0.5 mg/lit. x 1,000,000] x costs per kg
Lubricants costs/month
Treatment costs/month
41 x 0.746 x 12 x 30
(5,000 x 0.14601) + (6,011 x 0.17455)
Calculation
Facts:
Engine: 41 HP, functioning 12 hours per day, debit 10 l.p.s.
Lubricants: 2 litres/month, price $ 14.00 per litre
Sodium hypochlorite: 0.5 mg/litre, price $ 9.00 per kg
Price of energy
From 1 to 5000 KW
$ 0.14601/KW
From 5001 to 15,000 KW
$ 0.17455/KW
From 15,001 to 35,000 KW
$ 0.19267/KW
Additional KW
$ 0.21394
Daily salary of operator:
$ 30.00
Daily salary of assistant:
$ 22.00
Daily salary of accountant:
$ 35.00
1 HP = 0.746 KW
Formula
10,000
450,000
1%
160,000
Total
5%
50,000
60,000
110,000
50,000
Already in place
Initial investment
cost in pesos (IV)
Cost item
Tariff setting
15
Special parts
1%
10
15
Chlorinator
1%
1%
15
15
Supply pipes (PVC)
Distribution network
Electro-mechanical equipment
1%
25
Reservoir
1%
2%
20
15
Drilled well
Yearly O&M costs, as %
of the initial investment cost
Life cycle
(LC)
Distribution pipes (PVC)
Equipment
The system serves 600 families with an average of 5 persons per family.
Pumped piped system with a simple chlorinator. Treatment costs could be reduced by using a multi-stage filtration technique. It is proposed to recover all costs, and to constitute a fund that will
help to cover major repairs or replacements. The system includes:
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210
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
211
Through volumetric and efficiency pricing
A more precise way of signalling the true cost of supply to consumers is pricing based on
volumetric use. Marginal cost (MC) or efficiency pricing measures the cost of each additional (marginal) unit of water to a household. It is most clearly seen in volumetric prices
measured by household meters. A rational consumer response would be to demand additional water only as long as their demand or willingness to pay exceeded the marginal
cost of supply. When the average cost schedule begins to rise over a period of time, each
incremental or marginal unit of water supply becomes increasingly more costly to produce. Over the longer term, the marginal cost price will yield more revenue than the
average cost price, and indeed is at a maximum where it intersects the demand curve.
4.6 Developing an effective financial management system
Basic aspects of a financial management system
Many communities and, in certain remote areas, also municipalities lack skills in financial management which would allow them to organize, implement and control a cost
recovery system in an efficient way. The Tables below summarize the basic aspects of a
financial management system which has to be implemented by a Water Committee, and
the possible options:
Budgeting
Financial management issues
Possible options
What cost to budget for?
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Remuneration
Tools and spare parts
Small repairs only
All repairs
Extension, rehabilitation
Fuel, power supply, etc.
Depreciation
Etc.
What sources of income to use?
■
■
■
■
■
Regular user payments (monthly, sale per unit)
Village funds
Voluntary contributions
Credit schemes
Government subsidy
How to pay the mechanic or caretaker?
■
■
■
■
Per job
Per month ( fix + % of sales)
Per year after harvest
In cash/kind
Organization of financial flows
Financial management issues
Possible options
How to collect the money?
■
■
■
■
Billing
Collection at water point
Fund-raising when breakdown
Taking money from a fund
When to collect the money?
■
■
■
■
Per service provided
Monthly
After harvest
Beginning of financial year
Who collects the money?
■
■
■
■
■
Caretaker
Operator
User group
Village Water Committee
Community leaders
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212
Where to keep the money?
■
■
■
■
In
In
In
In
a safe
the village account
a bank account
a development fund
Financial administration
Financial management issues
Possible options
How to register movements of expenditures ■
and incomes?
■
■
■
Log book
Daily journal
Book-keeping
Bank statements
Who administers the funds?
■ Committee Treasurer (man or woman)
■ A village accountant
■ Bank accountant
What are funds used for?
■ Payment of expenditures related to O&M of water point
■ Generating bank interest
■ Use for other development projects
Who orders payments?
■
■
■
■
■
Operator
Treasurer
Water Committee
Village leaders
Assembly of users
Financial control and monitoring
Financial management issues
Possible options
What type of financial control?
Receipts from book-keeping
Regular meetings of Water Committee
Double signature for disbursement of funds
Feedback to users
Checking with meter reading
Checking with bank statements
Registered auditors
How to monitor?
Use of log book
Make a quarterly review and overview of the situation on
expenditures, incomes, and % of people who do not pay
What to do with bad payers?
This problem is particularly crucial for
“influential” members of society and
public institutions
Analysis of reasons for non-payment
Improvement of service
Improvement of relationship with the users
Campaign on benefits of good payers
Rescheduling of debt
Sanctions
4.7 Organizing access to alternative financial sources
It is important to plan and decide on financial mechanisms that would cover all costs, if
these cannot be covered by user’s fees, and especially when there are big repairs or
replacements to pay for. Access to alternative sources of financing is therefore
important. These sources include having access to credit facilities, establishing a fund,
subsidies, and cost-sharing arrangements with the authorities. The following Table gives
an overview of different financing mechanisms other than tariffs and rates.
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
213
Tapping on finances within communities
Voluntary funds
Found in communities with seasonal income and a tradition for fund-raising to help construction and big repairs.
People can contribute according to their ability to pay, but the contributions may not be linked to water use and
are difficult to control.
General community revenue
Found in communities with their own sources of income, which pays for construction and extensions. There
may be disputes on the priorities in utilizing these resources.
Revolving funds
Starting capital may come from a government donation or by the issue of shares to individual households. On
the basis of this capital, loans are given to individual households or groups. Upon repayment, new loans are
given to other members or groups.
Private or cooperative funds
Cooperative funds
Water supply is initiated and financed through a production cooperative or village revolving fund, which pays for
construction and expansion.
Water vending
Through water kiosks, concession sales, coin-operated taps, water carrying systems or community-based
distribution systems. Users buy water from these distribution points. The distributors pay a fee to the main
water supplier.
Private sector involvement
The private sector can invest some of its own capital in a water scheme. However, it will look for something in
return which can justify its investment, such as future contracts or ownership.
Subsidies from local/national government
Taxation (municipal resources)
Municipalities can collect the necessary funds through local taxes. Payment can be linked to income level, but
charges may not reflect the level of water consumption. This option presents limited scope for community
involvement in decision-making and financial system management.
Cross-subsidy
One way to make the service equitable and affordable for all is to subsidize the poor by imposing surcharges
on high-income consumers. Another example of a cross-subsidy is between sectors within the same community
or municipality.
Government subsidies
The central government and local authorities allocate part of their budget to operation and maintenance
activities. Subsidies can also be given to reduce the price of spare parts and chemicals, and to make technical
personnel available free to communities on request.
Credit—loan mechanisms
Loan through a bank
A bank allocates a loan to a Water Committee. However, most banks have a poor small credit policy for rural
communities. Communities cannot always produce the necessary guarantees. The Grameen Bank, in Bangladesh, is proposing a new bank approach to respond to the needs of the rural areas.
Micro-credit schemes
Communities organize, through local associations, micro-credit schemes where individuals and groups can
borrow money with a predetermined and agreed rate of interest. These schemes are adapted to community
needs and realities, but there is a limit to their lending capacity.
Social and development funds
Many developing countries have created special funds which give access to money for social and development
purposes, with an interest rate which can be much lower than that in the financial market. However, access to
these funds is open only to local authorities and municipalities, and not necessarily to communities. It is therefore important that communities and municipalities work in partnership. Access to these funds can be eased
through the payment of a regular fee, which will provide the possibility of obtaining a loan in case of necessity.
Grants
Donations (twin villages)
Donations can come through individuals (former inhabitants of a village who now live in a city or abroad). In
some cases, villages are twinned with other villages and cities in other countries, and grants have been
allocated through this mechanism in the past.
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Unit 6: Monitoring for effectiveness
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To distinguish between:
a) monitoring and evaluation
b) monitoring for efficiency and monitoring for effectiveness
■ To raise awareness on the principles of participatory monitoring
■ To review data collection methods
■ To review indicators and practice methodology for defining indicators
➽ Methodology
1. Introduction
2. Game on definitions
3. Interactive presentation on monitoring principles and monitoring system
4. Review of data collection methodology
5. Demonstration in plenary of methodology for defining indicators and a monitoring
system
6. Group exercises on indicators and monitoring system
7. Conclusion
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Flip chart and markers
✔ Coloured cards (thick paper)
✔ Graphic
➽ Handouts
✔ Exercise sheets
✔ Copies of transparencies and background information
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introduction
Monitoring is a key factor for sustainable operation and maintenance. However, it is
seldom practised in an efficient way, if at all. Monitoring is mostly practised during the
construction phase in order to control progress and expenditures, and rarely after this
phase. This session deals with monitoring operation and maintenance after the construction phase. It could be useful at this stage to ask the participants for their experience in monitoring, and about the problems they faced during monitoring.
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Game on definitions
The facilitator recalls the importance of having a clear understanding of the differences
between monitoring, evaluation, audit, and appraisal. It is proposed to use the graphic
of the project cycle (see page 217). The facilitator prepares, in advance, a graphic of the
project cycle on the board without writing down all the various elements linked to monitoring, audit, evaluation and appraisal. He will also prepare the following cards:
Appraisal
Impact evaluation
Audit
Mid-term evaluation
Monitoring inputs/outputs
Final evaluation
Monitoring O&M
The facilitator explains that the object of the game is to place the cards in the appropriate place in the project cycle, and to try to define for each card: 1) What is it? 2) What
is it for? 3) How is it done? 4) When is it done?
For this purpose the facilitator prepares a Table with 8 columns and 5 rows on a large
sheet, as shown below:
Appraisal
Audit
Mid-term
evaluation
Final
evaluation
Impact
evaluation
Monitoring
input/output
Monitoring
O&M
What is it?
What is it for?
How is it done?
When is it done?
Finally, the facilitator distributes an A4 paper with the main key words which will help
the participants to fill in the Table (see exercise sheet on page 218).
The game. The facilitator starts with the first card “appraisal”, and asks someone in
the group to come and place it on the graphic, drawing an arrow if necessary (see overhead sheet on page 217). The group then helps the participant in responding to each
question, using the key words provided in the A4 paper. If the participants want to add
words, they should feel free to do so, as long as they explain to the group why. The other
cards are treated and defined in the same way.
Hints. The facilitator ends the game by explaining that this course is concerned with
monitoring for O&M, i.e. monitoring for effectiveness, as opposed to monitoring for
efficiency which is about monitoring inputs/outputs. Definitions included in the background information (page 228) could help the facilitator when preparing for this
session.
Interactive presentation on monitoring principles and monitoring system
It is proposed to start with the key principles of monitoring, as described in the overhead
sheet (page 219), and for each point clarify with an example either from the group or
from the facilitator.
It is then proposed to have an explanation of information flows as shown in the overhead sheets, showing clearly who profits from the monitoring system, who will take
action, and what is the time lapse between an incident and the actual solving of the
problem. The facilitator should end the discussion on information flows by asking the
participants which information allows for greater effectiveness.
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The overhead sheet on “seven steps for planning a monitoring system” (page 223)
provides an overview on how to develop a plan for a monitoring system (see page 224).
The group will then focus on two main aspects: a) sources of information for collecting
data, and especially b) determination of indicators.
Review of data collection methodology
The facilitator distributes copies of “Sources of information” (pages 221, 222) to all the
participants, then asks them to pair up and review the document. The aim of the exercise is to highlight the tools and methodology which the participants are familiar with or
which need some further clarification. An initial clarification can start with each pair of
participants discussing for 15 minutes. They are then asked which tools they know and
which ones need some clarification. The clarification can be done by any of the participants as well as by the facilitator. It is essential for the facilitator to have an understanding of the tools presented, even though he or she might not have practised them all.
Demonstration of the determination of indicators
The facilitator starts by considering the definition of an indicator (see page 225), and
then proceeds with the methodology, explaining the format:
Theme
Characteristics
Variables
Selection
See background information (page 229) and a demonstration of the use of this methodology (see pages 226, 227).
Group exercises on indicators and monitoring system
The participants are divided into small groups of four to five and are asked to select one
of the key objectives from the objective tree. They will then determine a series of indicators using the above format for selecting indicators and then proceed to setting up a
monitoring system (see pag 224). Each group can present the result of its work.
Conclusion
At the end of this session the facilitator will hand over a series of indicators, which have
been developed in several projects, as references.
Level of development of project
Planning phase
Appraisal
Project cycle
3. Overhead and exercise sheets: Sheet 1
Implementation phase
Audits
Mid-term
evaluation
Monitoring for efficiency
Time
Impact evaluation
Implementation phase
Final evaluation
Monitoring for efficiency
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Exercise sheet 1
Game on definitions
Select the most appropriate definition for each term to be defined (some
definitions can be used twice or redefined if needed), in order to fill in the
Table which is proposed in the notes for the facilitator (see page 215).
Issue
Possible definition
What is it?
●
●
●
●
●
●
What is it for?
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
How is it done?
●
●
●
●
●
●
When is it done?
● After project implementation (one year or more)
● During the whole implementation of the project, starting
at the planning phase
● During the life of the project (after implementation, but
it could start earlier)
● Sometime during project implementation
● Before the project starts (planning stage)
● Half-way during implementation
● Some time before finalizing implementation of the project
Assessment of a situation
Occasional assessment of the development of a project
Continuous review of activities
Occasional analysis and use of resources
Continuous and systematic review of functioning of system
Occasional assessment and analysis of the effects of
the project
● Occasional assessment of the achievement of objectives
To take decisions on improvement of project performance
To revise the objectives of the project
To control achievement of targets and results
To control the performance and efficiency of the project
To control the achievement of objectives
To control use of resources
To design future activities
To prepare a second phase of a project
Auto-evaluations, internal process
External process
Field studies and participatory investigation
Analysis of project reports
Inherent management tool
Participatory process involving communities and
other actors
● Check of book-keeping and accounts
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Overhead sheet 2
Key principles of monitoring 1
● Monitoring should be based and planned on a
solid knowledge of objectives and activities
● Information should be used (solve a problem,
answer a question, improve the project, adapt
activities)
● Monitoring information should be collected and
acted upon at the lowest level possible
● Monitoring should be focused and simple (limit
number of indicators, length and cost of data
collection)
● Monitoring should be based on a careful
definition of indicators (they should really be
adapted to the project)
● Monitoring should combine qualitative and
quantitative information
● Monitoring should ensure checks and balances,
(validity and reliability of information)
● Monitoring should become an in-built integrated
activity and not a separate activity
1
Adapted from unpublished course material: K. Shordt. Monitoring for effectiveness. The Hague, IRC, 1997/98.
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Overhead sheet 3
Information flow
Centralized
Information is collected, and
feedback is poor.
There can be very long delays
in taking appropriate action.
Collection is often done by a
special team, which can be
costly.
Central
government
Delayed action
Local government
Delayed action
Communities
Participatory and
integrated government
Information flows to the actors
who have a direct interest in it,
and who can take action.
Monitoring is part of regular
activities of each group. Costs
are reduced, and efficiency
increased.
Central
government
Local
government
Private
sector
Rapid action
Communities
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221
Exercise sheet 2
Sources of information
Sources
Advantages/disadvantages
Book-keeping records, accounts,
audit
Used to monitor purchase, payments,
contracts
Data in books need to be compared
with vouchers, purchase orders and
receipts
Advantages: fast and already in use
Disadvantages: limited information,
information needs to be processed and
aggregated, not always easily available
Log books
Used to keep record of travels
Usually more about total distance than
number and type of villages visited
Advantages: already in common use in
project activities
Disadvantages: limited information
Check-lists
Used to measure conformity to
standard
Needs to be formulated in concrete,
unambiguous words; needs pre-testing
Advantages: quick and easy to use
Disadvantages: rough, inflexible, list of
items not always appropriate
Community minutes
Used to keep records of community
meetings
Needs to be done thoroughly
Advantages: provides information on
attendance and periodicity of meetings
Disadvantages: information limited to
issues dealt with in the meeting
Monitoring sheets
Used to check issues which change
over a period of time
Needs to made user-friendly
Advantages: shows progress over time,
can be used for many purposes
Disadvantages: can be misused or
under-analysed
Periodic reports
Used by project staff to report on
progress of activities
Data collected according to project
format
Advantages: good source of information
while the project is on
Disadvantages: information analysed
and processed according to project
objectives
Direct observation
Used to appreciate general conditions
of setting or to appreciate behavioural
change
Needs to be structured and organized
Advantages: direct information and
good training tool
Disadvantages: results often
disregarded, not enough statistical weight
Semi-structured interviews
Used for short interviews
Needs preparation of informal
questions beforehand
Advantages: when done in depth,
good information
Disadvantages: needs trained
interviewer, qualitative information often
not used
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Sources
Advantages/disadvantages
Focused group discussions
Advantages: possibility to analyse
Used for discussions in segment groups, problems and solutions in depth
or discussions on a specific theme
Disadvantages: needs skills and training
Needs to be prepared beforehand
to succeed, not always conclusive
Questionnaires, survey
Used to collect specific information
Needs to be kept short; needs
pre-testing
Advantages: specific, precise, cheap
and fast way to collect data
Disadvantages: often poor quality, to be
used with caution
Workshops
Used to gather community members or
other stakeholders
Needs to be well structured and
organized; needs facilitation
Advantages: useful to specify or
modify information
Disadvantages: information might need
to be validated
Stratified sampling
Using above methods, by level of
service, type of facility, socioeconomic
level, user/non-user
Advantages: improves quality of data
Disadvantages: sometimes inconclusive,
results not always used
Ranking; pocket chart voting
Used for quantifying preferences
Can easily be adapted to local
circumstances
Advantages: gives valid data, good
educational tool
Disadvantages: needs experience on
how to use it, needs time
Venn diagram
Advantages: Good probe of
Used to learn about relationships among performance of various partners
various groups, institutions
Disadvantages: subjective
Mapping
Useful to correlate variables, and to
analyse problems within the community
Advantages: excellent for planning,
education and advocacy
Disadvantages: complex to analyse if
done on a large scale
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Overhead sheet 4
Seven steps for planning a
monitoring system1
1. Identify key issues, concerns, questions or
demands which will become the focus of
monitoring
2. Determine indicators
3. Determine strategies for collecting, analysing and
reporting data
4. Determine the use of the information and how
action will be taken
5. Determine information flow, checks and
verification of information
6. Test monitoring system
7. Provide training or orientation to groups involved
1
Adapted from unpublished course material: K. Shordt. Monitoring for effectiveness. The Hague, IRC, 1997/98.
Issues to be
monitored
Indicators
Source of
information
Who
collects?
Periodicity
Collection of data
Matrix for setting up a monitoring system
Overhead sheet 5
How does
information
flow?
Who
analyses?
Use of data
Who takes
action?
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225
Overhead sheet 6
Characteristics of an indicator
● Definition of a quality (what?)
● Definition of a measure (how much?)
● Definition of a target group (who?)
● Definition of a time horizon (when?)
● Definition of a place (where?)
Example: All water points will be located within a
radius of 200 metres of at least 8 settlements,
by December 2000, in the region of Kebri.
In addition, an indicator must be:
● Relevant
(the indicator measures what is needed, and it is
related to the objectives)
● Sensitive
(the indicator responds to variations and changes)
● Simple
(the community and other actors are able to
understand it; and the data will be easy to act upon;
limitation of number of indicators)
● Feasible
(easy to collect information; possible to act upon;
not costly)
For each characteristic,
determination of quantifiable
variables. In some cases it
can be qualitative variables
Variables
●
●
●
●
relevance
sensitivity
simplicity
feasibility
Selection of variables,
according to the following
set of criteria:
Selection
Once the indicators are selected, understood and accepted by the various stakeholders, they need to be quantified and
tested.
This corresponds to a
description of the issue
List of the major relevant
characteristics of the issue
to be monitored
Issue to be monitored
What do I want to know?
What is the result I am
expecting?
Characteristics
Issue
Determination of indicators (1)
Exercise sheet 3
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226
— No. and type of participants in the workshops
capacity
— Level of knowledge
— No. of training workshops/year
— Presence of community in meetings
— Rotation of leadership
No. of posts with responsibilities
— No. of women with responsibilities/
— No. of decisions taken in General Assembly
— Balance in bank account
— Periodicity of payments
— Costs per month/monthly tariff
— % of users not paying
— Expenditures/Income
— No. of participants/total population
— Frequency of meetings
— Billed water/Produced water
Technical and managerial
Participation of community
Costs recovered
Community organization active
— % of public taps functioning
— Delay between damage and repair
— No. of hours of functioning/day
management
Efficient service
Community
Variables
improved
Characteristics
Issue
Determination of indicators (2):
an example from a small piped system
Overhead sheet 7
● % of users not paying
(men/women)
● Composition of Committee
attendance (men/women)
● Frequency of meetings and
per day
● No. of hours of functioning
Selection
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4. Background information
4.1 Monitoring in perspective1
Until recently, monitoring and evaluation were focused on finance, implementation and
construction targets and were viewed as the routine collection of data in project operations. In general, evaluation assesses the development of a project for the purpose of
making decisions on funding and drawing useful lessons. In 1983, the World Health
Organization developed the Minimum Evaluation Procedure (MEP) which focused on
the functioning and utilization of water and sanitation facilities and on hygiene education. The MEP emphasizes cheap, simple and quick methods. It developed 17 measurable indicators and added a new dimension to monitoring and evaluation by focusing on
the project’s functioning and utilization of outputs. Gradually, issues such as relevance,
efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability were added.
Since then, there have been several significant developments in monitoring and evaluation, e.g. more groups and actors are concerned with monitoring activities; there is an
interest in monitoring behavioural change; the process of monitoring has changed from
a central “monolithic” type to participatory monitoring; monitoring should become
integrated in regular activities; and there is an emphasis on the timely use of the results
of monitoring.
4.2 Definitions
➽ Appraisal
What is it?
What is it for?
How is it done?
When is it done?
Assessment of a situation
Design or implementation of future activities
Field studies; participatory appraisals
Planning phase of a project
➽ Audit
What is it?
What is it for?
How is it done?
When is it done?
Occasional analysis of use of resources (inputs)
Control of use of resources and achievement of results
Check of expenditures and income, using accounts/books
End of fiscal year or end of project phase
➽ Monitoring
What is it?
What is it for?
How is it done?
When is it done?
1
Continuous and systematic review of activities, processes, use
of inputs, and realization of outputs
Control of achievement of targets and results fixed by a plan
(performance, efficiency) and decisions about activities
Control of achievement of objectives (effectiveness)
Integrated and inherent management tool, through determination of indicators, collection/analysis of data
Monitoring efficiency: through project activity reports
Monitoring effectiveness: participatory process
Monitoring efficiency: during project planning and project
implementation
Monitoring effectiveness: at end of project implementation and
during project life
Adapted from: IRC unpublished course material, Monitoring for effectiveness. The Hague, IRC, 1997/98.
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➽ Evaluation
What is it?
What is it for?
How is it done?
When is it done?
Occasional assessment of the development of a project
To take decisions on improvement of project performance, or
modifications of project activities and objectives, or continuation or end of project
Auto-evaluations, external evaluations, participatory evaluations
Mid-term evaluations, final evaluations, impact evaluations
(after project implementation)
4.3 Indicators
An indicator is a variable which can be measured (quantity) or appreciated (quality or
trend), and which can show changes in a given phenomenon and the achievement of a
result or an objective.
An indicator has several characteristics including:
■
■
■
■
■
Definition of a quality (what?)
Definition of a measure (how much?)
Definition of a target group (who?)
Definition of a time horizon (when?)
Definition of a place (where?)
Example: All water points will be located within a radius of 200 metres of at least 8
settlements, by December 2000, in the region of Kebri.
In addition, an indicator must be:
■
■
■
■
Relevant (it measures what is needed, and is related to the objectives)
Sensitive (it responds to variations and changes)
Simple (the community and other actors can understand it; the data will be easy to
act upon; there is a limit to the number of indicators)
Feasible (information can be collected easily, not costly).
These last four specific characteristics can serve as selection criteria for the determination of indicators.
There are several ways to determine indicators. In many cases, indicators are selected
from a document and applied to a project without knowing if they correspond exactly to
what is needed and if they are appropriate.
It is possible to determine indicators which correspond exactly to what the project or
the community wants to measure. The following steps are recommended:
Step 1: Clarification of the issue to be monitored
The issue to be monitored normally corresponds to one of the results or objectives
which the project is trying to reach. It has to respond to a question: What do I want to
know?
Step 2: Description of characteristics
An inventory is made of the major relevant characteristics which correspond to the
issue to be monitored. In some ways, it is the same as describing the issue.
Step 3: Identification of variables
For each characteristic, one will try to identify quantifiable variables (time, percentage, ratio, price). It can be that the variable is more of a qualitative nature.
Step 4: Selection of indicators
Variables are then analysed through a selection process, with the following criteria
(as seen above): relevance, sensitivity, simplicity, feasibility.
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The determination of indicators can be carried out with the community, or with other
stakeholders who have a direct interest in monitoring. The indicators are then formulated and tested. The test could reveal that the indicator is too difficult to measure, or
that it does not have much relevance.
At community level, very simple and basic indicators can be formulated, which concern the functioning and use of the system, as well as its management. The community
has a direct interest in monitoring, since it is the community that has to act and will
benefit from an efficient system.
4.4 Examples of indicators
Example from the MEP (Minimum Evaluation Procedure) of WHO
1. Measuring functioning of systems
Indicators for water supply:
■ Water quantity (litres/person/day)
■ Water quality (E.coli, concentration of fluorides and other chemicals)
■ Reliability (frequency and duration of breakdowns)
■ Convenience (distance)
Indicators for sanitation:
■ Proportion of households having an improved latrine
■ Hygienic state of latrines (% of clean latrines/number visited)
■ Reliability of installations (qualitative: % in good state/number visited)
Indicators for hygiene:
■ Understanding the language of the messages (% of people speaking the language)
■ Understanding the content of the messages (proportions of those with good,
medium, low understanding)
■ Access to the messages (number of people reached by TV or radio, etc.)
2. Measuring use of systems
Indicators for water supply:
■ Proportion of households using the system
■ Volume of water used, by destination
Indicators for sanitation:
■ Proportion of users using the improved latrines
Indicators for hygiene:
■ Behaviour in terms of water storage
■ Cleaning of hands after defecation
■ Knowledge of oral rehydration
Example from: D. Narayan. Participatory evaluation: tools for managing change.
Washington, DC, World Bank, 1993 (World Bank Technical Paper No. 207)
1. Sustainability
Reliability of the system:
■ Quality of water at source
■ Number of facilities in working order
■ Adequate maintenance (low frequency of breakdowns, quick repairs, low downtime of facilities)
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Human capacity development:
■ Management abilities (who decides? men/women)
■ Knowledge and skills (understanding by men/women for improvement of the
system; proportion of technical skills available)
■ Confidence (rating scales on self-perception, leadership, initiative and sense of
efficacy)
Local institutional capacity:
■ Autonomy (who defines the rules? who controls the finances?)
■ Supportive leadership (style of management, working methodology)
■ Systems for learning and problem-solving (systems in place to resolve conflict, and
corrective actions)
Cost-sharing and unit costs:
■ Community contribution
■ Agency contribution
■ Unit costs
Collaboration among organizations:
■ Planning (collaboration, participatory planning)
■ Activities (collaboration)
2. Effective use
Optimal use:
■ Number and characteristics of users
■ Quantity of water used (all purposes)
■ Time taken to use facilities
■ Management of water resources (protection)
Hygienic use:
■ Water quality at home
■ Water transport and storage practices
■ Home practices to improve water quality
■ Site and home cleanliness
■ Personal hygiene practices
Consistent use:
■ Pattern of daily use
■ Pattern of seasonal use
3. Replicability
Community’s ability to expand the services:
■ Additional water or latrine facilities built
■ Number of upgraded facilities
■ New development activities initiated
Transferability of agency strategies:
■ Proportion and role of specialized personnel
■ Established institutional framework
■ Budget size and sheltering
■ Documented administrative or implementation procedures
■ Other special conditions
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Example from: A. Cotton. Tools for the assessment of operation and maintenance status
of water supplies. WHO and O&M Working Group of the Water Supply and Sanitation
Collaborative Council (in preparation)
— Management system:
System in existence and being followed
— Functioning supply points:
Number in working order x 100
Total number
— Reliability
Functioning time x 100
Total elapsed time
— Spare parts accessibility:
Mean time for arrival of identified spares/materials
— Cost:
Average O&M cost per user
— Operating revenue:
Operating revenue x 100
Population served
— Cost recovery:
Receipts + subsidies x 100
Average O&M costs
— VLOM personnel:
No. of systems with functioning committees
Total number of systems
— Supply continuity:
Average number of hours of daily supply
24
— Flow rating:
Present discharge
Discharge at handing over of scheme
— Pressure rating:
Present pressure
Discharge at handing over of scheme
— Water quality:
% samples > target number of E. coli per 100 ml
— Training (VLOM):
No. of VLOM (village-level O&M) personnel
(men and women) trained per community
— Materials and spare parts:
No. of repairs not done due to lack of spare parts
No. of orders of materials not fulfilled
No. of items out of stock
No. of spare part requisitions per water supply/year
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Example from: Technology transfer in water supply and sanitation—A learning
experience from Colombia. The Hague, IRC/CINARA, 1997 (Technical Paper 32-E).
Indicators for the evaluation of water supply systems
Theme
Indicator
Desired level
No. of connected households
Total no. of households
100%
Max. flow in the system
Min. flow in the source
<50%
Production
Actual flow in the system
Design flow
<100%
2.2
Quantity of use
Supply quantity per user
Design capacity per user
<100%
3.
Continuity
3.1
Continuity in the source
4.
1.
Coverage
2.
Available quantity
2.1
Number of supply hours per day
24 hours
Reduction over time
No reduction
Quality
Turbidity
Residual chlorine in distribution net
<5 NTU
0.3–0.6 mg/l
5.
Use of other water sources
No. of persons using other sources
No. of persons interviewed
0%
5.1
Efficient water use
No. of houses with leaking taps
No. of houses visited
0%
6.
Management capacity
6.1
O&M capacity
6.2
Representation of women
7.
Cost
7.1
Tariffs
No. of indebted users
Total no. of users
<5%
Supervision of the operator
Yes
Trained operator with work tools
Yes
No. of trained women in the committee
No. of trained committee members
50%
Monthly revenue
Monthly expenditures
Monthly tariff
Monthly family income
>1
<3%
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Unit 7: Working and planning with communities
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To review the tools and processes for working with communities
■ To identify the most appropriate tools for different phases of the project cycle
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Focused discussion and interactive presentation
3. Review of tools
4. Exercise linking tools with the project cycle
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Flip chart and markers
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of transparencies and background information
✔ Exercise sheet
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introduction
Community participation and community management are increasingly being accepted
in developing countries, but there is very often a lack of expertise on how to apply and
implement them. This session reviews the basic approach and attitudes for promoting
and developing community management, based on lessons summarized by IRC after a
four-year investigation on the role of communities in six countries in the management of
their water supply systems. The session also gives an overview of the various tools for
working and planning with communities. To describe the tools in detail and to practise
using them would require another 1–2 weeks. Finally, the participants will select the tools
and processes which are most appropriate to different phases of the project cycle.
Focused discussion and interactive presentation
The facilitator asks the group about their experiences in working and planning with
communities, and then gives some good and not so successful examples. Overhead sheets,
together with background information on processes and approaches, are provided.
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235
Review of tools
An overview of the tools is given in the overhead sheets (pages 240–242), which can be
distributed to the group. The participants, in pairs, will review all the tools for about 15
minutes, identifying those which they know from the others. Each pair will then briefly
describe their experiences and indicate the tools they know nothing about.
The facilitator should be acquainted with all the tools described below. If possible, a
social worker could be invited to describe his or her work in applying these tools, and the
participants could comment on the tools which they have used. The facilitator could test
selected tools in the class. Common tools for such tests are Social mapping, Venn
diagram, Pocket chart (see overhead sheets and background information).
Exercise linking tools with the project cycle
The participants, working in pairs, will be asked to propose which tool is suitable for
what type of situation in the project cycle. In the meantime, the facilitator prepares on
the board a graphic describing the project cycle. After the pairs have finished their preparation (15 minutes), they will be asked to indicate where each tool is to be placed in the
project cycle and for what it can be used best (see background information).
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3. Overhead sheets: Sheet 1
Limiting factors for the
participation of the community
● Poor credibility
● Lack of self-confidence
● Resistance to change
● Fear of the financial consequences which a new
project would bring
● Pessimism as a result of having had to accept the
present situation for so long
● Lack of experience in dealing with institutions
● Poor knowledge of problem-solving and planning
methodologies
● Nervousness to speak in public
● Fear of intervening in the presence of an outsider
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Overhead sheet 2
Limiting factors for the
participation of local authorities
● Not knowing how to integrate the social aspects
with the technical aspects
● Lack of communication channels between the
municipality and the community
● Poor perception of community problems
● No priority for rural communities
● Lack of knowledge on participatory planning
● Insufficient staff trained for rural water supply and
sanitation
● Infrequent visits to the community
● Dominating attitude
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Overhead sheet 3
How to stimulate
community management
● Involvement of communities in the project cycle
Involve the users from the very start of the project cycle:
Users in the driving seat—Awareness—Diagnosis—Planning—
Prioritizing—Experimentation—Monitoring repeatedly (providing
training where needed)—Follow-up
● Approach
Responding to demand
Partnership between the authorities and the community
Changing from implementer to facilitator
Coordinated, multisectoral, integrated approach
Decentralization: going closer to the customer
Making use of local knowledge and management skills
Speaking the language and knowing the culture
Working with a participatory approach
● Attitudes
Build trust
Patience (give enough time)
Listen and observe
Promote dialogue among all actors
Be aware of gender issues
Provide feedback
Be able to work with participatory techniques
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Overhead sheet 4
Seven steps to
community planning1
1. Problem identification
2. Problem analysis
3. Planning for solutions
4. Selecting options
5. Planning for activities
6. Planning for monitoring and evaluation
7. Participatory evaluation
1
From: PHAST step-by-step guide: A participatory approach for the control of diarrhoeal disease. PHAST (Participatory
Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), SIDA, UNDP-World Bank, WHO, Geneva, 1998.
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240
Overhead sheet 5
Overview of tools for planning and
working with the community
Working and
planning tools
Brief description
Advantages/disadvantages
PRA
(Participatory
Rural Appraisal)
Process used in development
programmes to help rural communities to organize their knowledge,
identify and prioritize local development needs, and develop long-term
action plans; consists in preliminary
visits, participatory data collection
exercises, participatory analysis and
planning
Advantages: full participation of
communities right from the start;
plans reflect a field reality;
establishment of good working
relationships and communication
lines between authorities and the
community
Disadvantages: one has to be
familiar with participatory techniques; takes time
Mind mapping
Thought processes are brought
together in a spontaneous, associative way, resulting in a “map” of
landmarks which are classified and
organized into a branching arrangement
Advantages: open, expandable;
good for vision development,
very versatile
Disadvantages: global overview, emphasizes linear relationships
SWOT
(Successes
Weaknesses
Opportunities
Threats)
Simple, flexible, versatile working
tool for situation analysis in groups;
it records the positive and negative
experiences of participants, as well
as their assessment of obstacles
and potentials in a given situation
Advantages: easy, can be
understood in an intercultural
setting; no special materials
needed
Disadvantages: does not offer
concrete solutions, only possibilities
Brainstorming
Group puts forward as many suggestions as possible about a set
theme; the ideas are sorted, analysed, evaluated, and classified
under “Immediately feasible” or
“Needs further development”
Advantages: easy, quick;
stimulates intuitive and spontaneous thinking
Disadvantages: few suggestions are actually used; effort
needed is often underestimated
Scenario-writing Design of alternative views for the
future, labelled as “probable”,
“optimistic” and “pessimistic”
options; start with a situation
analysis, then prognosis analysis
and the programme phase
Advantages: suitable for
complex, long-term problems;
widens the planning horizons
Disadvantages: time-intensive;
needs good information base
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Working and
planning tools
Brief description
Advantages/disadvantages
OOPP
(Objective
Oriented Project
Planning)
Systematic planning method based
on teamwork and visualization, and
logical analysis; it includes an
analysis of participation, problems
analysis, objective analysis, choice
of alternatives, and a project planning matrix
Advantages: promotes mutual
understanding of problems;
clarifies cause-and-effect relationships; enables participation of
professionals together with
beneficiaries; only parts of it can
be used, such as problem
analysis
Disadvantages: Reality only
accessible through rational
thinking; requires a good
facilitator
Morphological
box
Systematic search for alternative
solutions. Possible solutions are
broken down into elements and the
most important characteristic of
each element is identified. All these
are arranged in a “morphological”
box. Combinations of various
elements are made by drawing lines
to link them
Advantages: suitable for clearly
defined problems where combinations and variations are
important
Disadvantages: less suitable for
problems which require a high
degree of analysis
Utility value
analysis
The situation is presented with
various alternatives. Criteria are
developed for the acceptance of the
project. Each criterion is weighted
(W), e.g. 1 to 10, with an alternative
for each criterion (A). The utility
value will be W x A.
A final comparative evaluation is
carried out for decision-making
Advantages: qualitative and
quantitative assessment of a
situation, versatile in its
application
Disadvantages: assessment
and weighting figures should be
documented; can be difficult for
communities to understand
Task chart
Used for organizing work procedures, including the staff’s functions
Advantages: organizational
chart, good basis for job
description
Disadvantages: only operational
plan, depends on previous
analysis
Bar chart
(Gantt chart)
Used for the chronological planning
of tasks, with individual working
steps listed on an activity axis
Advantages: graphic and simple
Disadvantages: relies on
previous analysis, interconnections difficult
Flow chart
Description of sequence of activities
and a structured process in the form
of an algorithm
Advantages: simple and easy,
suitable for routine planning
Disadvantages: relies on
previous analysis, suitable for a
single process
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242
Working and
planning tools
Brief description
Advantages/disadvantages
Action
research
The above tools can be used,
including a review of experiences in
the field in a participatory way and
over a period of time
Advantages: close to reality,
integrates social change dimension, learning by experience
Disadvantages: time-consuming, needs acceptance of participatory results
Mapping of
community
Drawing of a simple map of the
community, developed by both
women’s and men’s groups, showing
boundaries, water sources, housing
infrastructure, roads, etc.
Advantages: provides a vision
of the community by the community, and updates information
Disadvantages: more an
information collection tool than a
planning tool
Village history
This results from discussions with
the communities and shows, on a
time line, the local, national and
international events which are
important for the community
Advantages: provides information about the community’s past
experience and problems
Disadvantages: needs several
sources of information for validity
Transect walk
This results from a walk with community members and describes the
natural environment and areas of
use, with particular problems or
possible opportunities
Advantages: direct information
on surroundings observed and
shared with community members
Disadvantages: requires
subsequent further analysis
Trend lines
Provides a brief summary of trends
on specific issues (health, water
availability, etc.), as a result of small
group discussions
Advantages: graphic, visual
Disadvantages: provides only
very general, global information
Problem
ranking
Shows key problems identified by
the community, with the order of
priority for having them solved
Advantages: participatory
analysis of values and priorities
Disadvantages: does not
analyse the causes
Venn diagram
Represents groups or institutions in
the form of circles (the bigger the
circle, the bigger the role). The
positions of the circles relative to
one another show the type of
relationship between the groups and
the institutions
Advantages: good visualization
and understanding of how groups
relate to one another
Disadvantages: subjective and
provides only limited information
Pocket chart
(voting)
Voting on drawings representing
specific situations or alternatives
Advantages: democratic,
expresses desires
Disadvantages: requires
materials and experience
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4. Background information
4.1 In general
Working and planning with communities
One of the first tasks for a manager or a managerial group with community responsibilities is to understand and assess the present situation. This can be done in different ways,
e.g. by reading reports and studies on particular projects, holding a series of professional
staff meetings to get the staff’s perceptions, and making field visits to see the situation.
Experience has shown that a good plan is based on a participatory assessment or
evaluation of the situation, which reflects the realities in the field and can be a way of
involving communities, right from the start, in their future responsibilities. People do
not always have the same perceptions and views, because they may belong to different
cultures or have different priorities in their working or living environments. Participatory
planning is based on a common understanding of the problem, and is simple, democratic
and motivating. It allows professionals at different levels, from different departments or sectors, as well as community members and users to reach a common consensus on a situation.
Several working tools can be used for this participatory approach. The overhead sheets
provide an overview of some of these tools, and additional information can be found in
the supporting documents. However, a methodology is proposed below, based on four
years’ experience with communities in six countries on their role in the management of
water supply services.
4.2 The Participatory Action Development (PAD) approach1
Participatory Action Development (PAD) is a methodology for improving community
management of rural water supplies, in which all the actors involved contribute both to
the creative thinking that goes into the undertaking, and to the action that is the subject
of the development work. PAD aims to learn from the past and to find solutions to concrete problems and conflicts in the management of rural water supplies by communities.
At the same time, PAD can help organizations to discover how they can best support
communities in their efforts to improve the management of rural water supplies.
The methodology also aims to respond to the urgent need of communities to
improve their skills for managing public services, thus operationalizing what is known as
the ‘demand responsive approach’. The key characteristics of this approach, developed
during the Community Water Supply and Sanitation Conference in May 1998
(organized by the World Bank/UNDP–World Bank Water and Sanitation Program), are
presented in the box below.
Key characteristics of the demand-responsive approach
(a) Community members can make informed choices about: whether to participate in the project; technological
and service level options based on their willingness to pay and on the principle that more expensive systems
cost more; when and how their services are delivered; how funds are managed and accounted for; and how
their services are operated and maintained.
(b) The government plays a facilitating role, sets clear national policies and strategies, encourages broad
stakeholder consultations, and facilitates capacity-building and learning.
(c) An enabling environment is created for the participation of a wide range of providers of goods, services and
technical assistance to communities, including the private sector and NGOs.
(d) An adequate flow of information is provided to the community, and procedures are adopted that will facilitate
collective decisions within the community and between the community and other actors (social intermediation).
Source: Community Water Supply and Sanitation Conference, World Bank/UNDP–World Bank Water and Sanitation Program, Washington DC,
USA, May 1998.
1
Extracts from: M. Lammerink et al. Facilitating community discovery: getting to know about community management. The Hague, IRC,
1998 (Community Managers for Tomorrow Series, No. 4).
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PAD enables communities, together with the staff of the support organization, to
participate throughout the development process, starting from the initial design of an
intervention, through data gathering and analysis, to the presentation of the final results
and discussion of the implications of their actions. Communities are actively engaged in
the quest for information and ideas to guide their future actions.
It is not always possible or necessary to work closely with an entire community. A small
group can be formed to work as direct partners with the staff in the support organization, and to provide feedback to the whole community when required. Members of the
small group are both community members and local development workers, so that
dialogue between the professionals in the support organization and the people at the
grassroots level is a key feature of the process. PAD is a learning process for community
members and the staff in the support organization, enabling both sides to learn from
their experiences in a socially desirable action.
PAD offers an effective and powerful strategy for carrying out the type of interdisciplinary work that is needed to assist communities to take the lead in their own development. It is a real demand-responsive approach, resulting in improved community
management of rural water supplies. It also allows for a better understanding of the
strengths and weaknesses of community management, because through the methods
and tools used, it takes a holistic view of management practices and problems. PAD can
be rapidly adjusted to local conditions in different countries. In particular, by providing
feedback to the community it can stay close to reality.
The PAD methodology places strong emphasis on methods for assessment of participatory and gender-sensitive appraisal and needs. It uses both qualitative and quantitative
methods for collecting data on system performance and service, such as distribution,
breakdown rates, costing, demographics, local organization, and the socioeconomic
characteristics of served and unserved households. In doing so, PAD builds on earlier
appraisal methodologies such as Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA) and Participatory Rural
Appraisal (PRA).
PAD involves three major phases:
■
■
■
Diagnosing: the staff prepare for the job, communities are selected, and problems
and problem-solving strategies are identified.
Experimenting: problem-solving strategies, methods and tools are tested and evaluated.
Sustaining the process: the findings are shared and disseminated, and the work that
needs to be done to sustain the development process is planned and coordinated.
4.3 Diagnosis1
Getting prepared for PAD
The support organization must first prepare itself for the application of PAD. To identify
what needs to be done to get prepared, the support organization must ask a number of
questions, such as: Does PAD fit within the mandate of our organization? Is our organization sufficiently flexible to cope with support requirements which may vary in terms of
the time required, the necessary resources and the intensity of support? Can we put
together a multidisciplinary and gender-balanced support team which will allow us to
address social as well as technical issues, and men as well as women? Do the staff have
previous experience with PAD? Are they capable of facilitating development processes
rather than merely implementing water and sanitation projects? Do the team members
trust each other sufficiently to be able to collaborate and learn from each other? What
1
Extracts from: M. Lammerink et al. Facilitating community discovery, op. cit.
MODULE 3. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE O&M
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do we know about community management experiences elsewhere in the country? The
composition and the experiences of staff within the organization will determine the
extent to which efforts are to be undertaken in order to ‘get prepared’ for PAD. In choosing to apply a PAD approach, the organization will move away from merely implementing water supply and sanitation projects, to facilitating development processes.
Training the support team
Planning and training workshops should be part of the preparatory phase. During such
workshops the project team of the support organization can exchange the preliminary
findings from the country assessment, agree on an analytical framework, develop a common support approach, develop a methodology and criteria for the selection of project
communities, and identify appropriate participatory and gender-specific methods and
tools for carrying out the performance and situation assessments with community
members. Learning to work with such participatory methods and tools for community
diagnosis, and to creatively use a basket of tools should also be part of these workshops.
Implementation plans, including indications of how gender aspects will be addressed,
can be prepared and the team can draft material to brief the support organization on the
approach and its implications.
The planning and training workshops can be facilitated by staff from organizations
with experience with the PAD approach who can offer training activities and facilities.
Such organizations exist in at least six countries in Asia, Latin America and Africa, and
they are growing in number.
Selecting the communities
Part of the task of the planning and training workshop is to develop a methodology and
a set of criteria for the selection of communities to work with. First, it must be decided
whether to select only the communities that requested support, or also include those
with whom the support organization finds it important to work. It is certainly preferable
to work with communities who have asked for support, but some more remote communities may be unaware that they too could apply. Support organizations may therefore have
to take the initiative in approaching the latter.
Some of the criteria for selecting communities with whom to apply the PAD approach
may be similar to those used for general community selection. These criteria include:
whether the people have expressed a need for improvement, the accessibility of the
community, the people’s willingness to invest time and effort in a project applying the
PAD approach, the level of equity and equality within the community, and the outcomes
of previous management efforts in that community. In accordance with their own development philosophy, support organizations may also include criteria such as geographical location, socioeconomic conditions, presence of underprivileged groups within the
community, and political stability.
4.4 The process of community diagnosis
The question of whether a community diagnosis is to be carried out in a participatory
way can be looked at from two perspectives: pragmatic and ethical. Pragmatic considerations include how much time is available for the diagnosis, the skills of the staff, how
many communities are to be included, as well as the type of information and how
detailed and reliable that information needs to be. Ethical considerations include whether
the community members want a diagnosis; if so, who will decide which areas should be
explored, who will make the observations, who will conduct interviews and with whom,
and who will determine how the information will be used?
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Community diagnosis seeks to gather information which will be used as the basis for
planning and implementing development activities, and to prepare the people for
action. The assessment will include issues such as the roles of men and women in local
management, the effects of gender on the efficiency and use of water supplies, environmental concerns such as water source protection and watershed management, and issues
of cost recovery and community-based financial management. The outcome of a
community diagnosis gives some insight into problems with a negative effect on the management of the water supply system, provides local knowledge and resources available to
improve the existing situation, and indicates strategies to resolve these problems.
Community diagnosis has a number of distinguishing elements:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
building and maintaining rapport;
establishing a local PAD team;
collecting general and factual information;
determining the range of topics of interest for further exploration;
screening indigenous knowledge and existing management practices for possible
application in water supply management;
collecting detailed information on identified topics: problems, potentials and available resources;
prioritizing problems, identifying the root causes of problems, and establishing
selection criteria;
identifying and selecting potential solutions and possible problem-solving strategies;
providing feedback to the community.
Although community diagnosis is often seen as a step in development, with a clear
beginning and an end, experience has shown that it is a continuous, repeated process
since newly revealed facts trigger new questions that require investigation. Once action
to improve a problem situation has begun, the community will probably run into
unexplored areas that require further investigation.
4.5 Tools—Fact sheets
Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA)—Mind mapping—Successes–Weaknesses–Opportunities–Threats (SWOT)—Creativity workshop—Scenario writing—Morphological box—
Utility value analysis—Task chart—Bar chart (Gantt chart)—Flow charts—Historical
line—Mapping—Venn Diagram—Community walk—Pocket chart—Priority ranking.
Fact sheets on these tools appear in the following pages (247–263).
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FACT SHEET
Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA)1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●
●●●
●●
—
—
●
●●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Similar/related approaches
Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA); Farmers First; Participative Learning Methods (PALM); Approach Development; Action
Research
Brief description
The PRA approach enables a rapid and inexpensive assessment of the most important features of the living conditions of
an urban or rural population. The assessment is done primarily by an interdisciplinary team (including at least one
sociologist) and takes place in the field. PRA is designed as an ongoing learning process for both local as well as external
participants. A conscious attempt is made to avoid misrepresentations with regard to staff selection, timing, season,
route, etc. Tailor-made tools, some of which are developed locally at the time, are used, such as: a) semi-structured
interviews, b) historical profile, c) ranking of values, d) seasonal charts, e) pocket chart, f) participatory problem
analysis, g) joint field visits, f) direct observations.
Advantages
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Related to both problems and potentials
Promotes competence and reinforces independence
Appropriate for rural setting
Compares and takes into account different opinions
Evaluates local know-how and technology together with the communities
Builds trust and understanding within the community
No special methodological knowledge required by local participants
Tools can be applied in a flexible fashion (encourages creativity).
Limitations
■
■
■
■
■
■
1
Leads to a considerable amount of collected information (not always used)
Raises expectations in the community
Findings need to be elaborated further for practical implementation
Situation-specific and thus difficult to compare from one place to another
Can require a lot of time
Requires knowledge of participatory techniques, openness.
Reference document: McCracken/Pretty/Conway. Introduction to RRA for agricultural development. IIED, 3 Endsleigh Street,
London WC1H 0DD, England (1988). In: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners.
Swiss Development Cooperation, Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Mind mapping1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
●
—
●
—
—
—
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
Mind mapping facilitates the overview on a central theme. Thought processes are brought together in a spontaneousassociative way and identified with key words or symbols. In this way a chosen theme is assessed from different
perspectives and a “map of landmarks” emerges. The landmarks are classified and organized into a branching arrangement, thus enabling classification into further branches.
■ Visit training course
■ Building progress
■ Exchange of
experiences
■ Common interest
among partners
■ Project workers
■ Needs of beneficiaries
■
■
■
■
■ Synergies
■ Environmental
compatibility
SEASON
Holidays
Festivals
Weather
Crops
RELATIONSHIP
TECHNICAL ASPECTS
OPTIMIZING BENEFITS
GOALS
■ Change in
government
POLITICS
■ Staff changes
■ Evaluation results
■ Project phase
PROJECT
TIME
ORGANISATION
PROJECT
VISIT
■
■
■
■
■
Travelling formalities
Visas, vaccinations
Money
Workshop preparations
Camera, PC, material
PREPARATION
ROLES
OBSTACLES
TEAM
■ Constructive criticism
■ Capacity; tendencies
ME
■
■
■
■
Listen
Willingness to understand
Reflect own perception
Openness
■ Strained cooperation
between government
and NGO
■ New local project
leader with different
perspectives
■ Competition with
other donors
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Alternatives
Follow-up
Methodology
Key documents
Telephone calls
Visits
Meetings
Advantages
■ Open, expandable
■ Provides an overview at a glance
■ Very versatile.
Limitations
■ Rough analysis and overview
■ Emphasizes linear relationships.
1
Reference document: Buzan T. Kopftraining, Anleitung zum Kreativen Denken. Munich (1990). In: Cooperation planning—A working
aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation, Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Successes—Weaknesses—Opportunities—Threats (SWOT)1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
—
●
●
—
●●●
●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
SWOT is a simple, flexible and versatile working tool for situational analysis in groups. It has the advantage that it can
easily be understood in an intercultural setting. It records the positive and negative experiences (successes and weaknesses) of the present situation, as well as anticipates the future opportunities and obstacles (threats) that are most
likely to arise in a given situation.
Review of present situation
Anticipation of future situation
Successes
Positive experiences
Opportunities
Assessment of potentials
Weaknesses
Negative experiences
Threats
Anticipation of obstacles
Advantages
■
■
■
■
Simple (partners can quickly apply the method themselves)
The joint review provides clarity on different opinions
Enables the participation of socially weaker parties on an equal basis
No special material is needed.
Limitations
■ SWOT does not offer any solutions; it merely serves to provide clarification and to structure opinions
■ The moderator (facilitator) should have basic knowledge of visualization methods.
1
Adapted from: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation,
Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Creativity workshop1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●
●●●
●●●
—
●●●
●
●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
This workshop method provides an organizational framework for the participatory examination of problem situations and
joint problem-solving. The participants are divided into large groups and the workshop takes place in five steps over one
or two working days. The five steps consist of the following:
1. Preparatory phase: Tuning in; setting a pleasant atmosphere; participants get to know each other, exchange motives; needs and goals are formulated, procedures and working techniques determined (visualization with sheets of
paper or cards).
2. Criticism phase: Problems are presented, criticism expressed; exaggeration is allowed; selection of themes from
the critical contributions, re-formulation of critical themes into goals.
3. Utopian phase: Build a creative atmosphere; criticism is not allowed; present dreams, utopian visions and ideal
solutions without thinking of the limitations set by reality (brainstorming); selection of the most interesting visions.
4. Realization phase: The results are examined and studied more closely; priorities are set; select a proposal; first
steps for an implementation plan are decided upon.
5. Permanent workshop (in smaller core groups): The proposal chosen in the realization phase is expanded and
refined; project designs emerge; only designs which are feasible with regard to subject and reality (opposition,
constraints, resource requirements, etc.) are considered; project goal is set.
Advantages
■ Procedures are democratically determined by the participants
■ Exaggeration is not limited, but encouraged so as to trigger creative associations
■ The concept combines a playful approach with analysis.
Limitations
■ Workshop leaders must be experienced and well versed in a repertoire of possible working techniques so that specific results can be achieved; each phase requires clear and specific rules; in order to avoid both euphoria and
resignation, it must be made clear at the beginning which criteria will be used to evaluate and prioritize the criticism
and utopian suggestions; this method is not suitable for socially differentiated groups.
1
Adapted from: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation,
Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Scenario writing1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●
●●●
—
—
—
—
—
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
Scenario techniques are used in the design of alternative views for the future. They are particularly suitable for dealing
with long-term problems whose solutions depend on many variables (e.g. energy issues, development of transportation,
promotion of training, etc.).
In the case of difficult questions, the drawing up of scenarios undergoes numerous steps. Firstly, the task is defined in
simplified terms and the scope of investigation is set. Then the environment and its influencing factors are assessed with
regard to possible future developments: the anticipated history is written in advance.
As a rule, “probable”, “optimistic” and “pessimistic” alternatives are drawn up, which form the possible scenarios in the
search for specific solutions. The sequence of steps is not strictly predetermined. Different planning and working techniques may be used according to their suitability.
Suggested steps:
➽ Situation analysis: delineation of problems, relationship with the environment, initial situation
➽ Prognosis phase: alternative trends, possible future events, situational crossroads, selection criteria
➽ Programme phase: development of scenarios, alternative strategies, programmes.
Advantages
■ Suitable for complex, long-term problems
■ Widens the planning horizon
■ Promotes development-oriented thinking.
Limitations
■ Time-intensive
■ Demanding with regard to information requirements and interdisciplinary proficiency
■ Open to manipulation.
1
Adapted from: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation,
Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Morphological box1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
—
—
●●●
—
—
—
—
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
The morphological box enables the systematic search for alternative solutions for a clearly defined problem. Possible
solutions are broken up into elements and the most important characteristics of each element are identified (possibly by
brainstorming). These elements and their characteristics are then arranged in a morphological box. This facilitates
assessing and combining solutions and their characteristics until the most suitable variation(s) is found.
Example: Plot irrigation
Elements
Characteristics
1
2
3
Source
River
Ground water
Rain water tank
Pump
Diesel
Hand
Electric
Distribution
Canal
Pipes
Pipes and canal
Per unit volume
Per unit time
Flat rate
Individual
Committee
Municipality
Payment of water
Organization
Alternative 1
Advantages
■ Suitable for clearly defined problems where an overview of solution combinations and variations is important.
Limitations
■ Less suitable for complex problems requiring a high degree of analysis
■ Assessment of alternatives may need much effort and time.
1
Adapted from: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation,
Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Utility value analysis1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
—
—
●●●
—
—
—
—
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
Utility value analysis enables the evaluation, assessment and selection of different options for introducing change. This
involves decision-making which depends on factors which are both quantitative and objective, as well as qualitative and
subjective. By using utility value analysis, the situation is presented in a transparent way and the evaluation criteria of all
the participants are clearly disclosed. Utility value analysis involves the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Setting limits to the task (objectives, situation analysis, identification of shortcomings)
Presentation of alternative solutions
Development of assessment criteria
Weighing of each criteria (P)
Assessment of alternatives, (E; criteria E varies from 1 to 10)
Calculation of the utility value (E x P)
Comparative evaluation (horizontal, individual criteria; vertical, overall impression) and decision-making.
Example: Choosing the site for the project office of a development project
Assessment criteria
Accessibility for villagers
Travelling effort for staff
Premises
Partner contacts
Policy agreements
Attractiveness
Total
Weighing
Solution 1
(outside project zone)
P
E
ExP
30
15
10
20
10
15
3
3
5
6
5
6
90
45
50
120
50
90
100
Solution 2
(in project area)
E
ExP
10
7
2
3
1
3
300
105
20
60
10
45
445
540
Advantages
■
■
■
■
Complex problem formulations are made accessible to all participants
Human and intuitive components of assessments are emphasized at the same level as objectives
The risk of wrong decisions by individuals is reduced
Criteria and their weighing can be used as a monitoring basis.
Limitations
■ Assessment and weighing figures should be documented so that they are comprehensible to outsiders. If important
decision-makers are not present, the results have less value.
1
Reference document: Voelkner J. Planungsmethoden in Verwaltung und Wirtschaft. Regensburg-Berlin-Bonn (1992), in: Cooperation
planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation, Evaluation Service, CH3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Task chart1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
—
—
—
—
●●●
—
—
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
Task charts are used to organize work procedures. The functions of the staff at every step are indicated diagrammatically in the chart. In its simplest form, the compiling of an annual report can be depicted as follows:
Tasks
Activities
Project
leader
Planning
Consultant
Section
Head
Technical
assistant
Review
experiences
Plan./
Dec.
Plan./
Dec.
Plan./
Impl.
Dec.
Dec./
Impl.
Plan./
Impl.
Coord.
Organization
Arrange Report
Editing
Approval
Plan. = planning
Contr. = control
Administrator
Community
Impl.
—
Impl.
Dec./
Impl.
Impl.
Info.
—
Plan./
Impl.
Impl.
Impl.
Impl./
Contr.
—
—
Coord.
—
—
Dec. = decision-making
Info. = information
—
Impl. = implementation
Coord. = coordination
Bold letters indicate the main responsibility; ordinary letters indicate lesser responsibility or co-responsibility.
Advantages
■ The organizational sequence becomes transparent
■ Encourages allocation of responsibility
■ Provides a good basis for job descriptions.
Limitations
■ Graphical over-simplification
1
From: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation, Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Bar chart (Gantt chart)1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
—
—
—
●
●●●
●
—
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
Gantt bar charts are used for the chronological planning of tasks. Individual working steps are listed on the activity axis
of the chart. The duration of the activities is indicated on the time axis by bars.
Example: Programme evaluation
Activities
Duration
(days)
Preparation
8
Field investigation
20
Analysis of results
5
Preparation of Workshop
3
Workshop
4
Follow-up
Ongoing
Implementation time span (months)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Advantages
■ Graphic and simple
■ Wide selection of PC programmes.
Limitations
■ Updating can be difficult
■ Interconnections between activities may not be easily recognizable.
1
From: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation, Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Flow charts1
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
—
—
—
●
●●●
—
—
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
The sequence of the activities of a process is structured in a transparent way in a flow chart. The steps of each activity
are represented by symbols such as “Start”, “Develop”, “Check”, “Decision”, etc.
Example:
Request to
rehabilitate water
supply system
Request from community
Consideration by the project
Decision
No
Yes
Need for
modification
Revision
Detail planning
with the community
Budget
Advantages
■ Simple, easily learnt
■ Suitable for planning and control of routine tasks.
Limitations
■ Suitable only for specific processes
■ Unsuitable for time-related planning.
1
From: Cooperation planning—A working aid for beginners and for more experienced planners. Swiss Development Cooperation, Evaluation Service, CH-3003 Berne, Switzerland (1993).
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FACT SHEET
Historical line
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
●
—
—
—
—
●●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
This tool consists in collecting the most important historical events and facts of the community in a chronological way.
It is especially used to highlight the history of the community, the life of community organizations, the history of water
supply, and the chronology of a project.
It is carried out through a series of questions on a specific theme and a pre-established check-list which is discussed with
the community. One could use a large sheet of paper, or a board which is divided vertically into two parts: the left part
to record time, and the right for recording the events or facts.
Example
Spring 1994
Summer 1995
September 1995
First visit of provincial staff
Visit of community at provincial headquarters
Second visit of staff and start of investigations
January 1996
May 1996
December 1996
February 1997
Start of construction of well and installation of
pump, as well as training of community
Handing-over ceremony
First breakdown
Repair by specialized team
December 1998
Second breakdown
Advantages
■ Helps to get a common understanding of a series of events and their relationship in time
■ Very good for starting a problem analysis together with the community
■ Simple and easy to use.
Limitations
■ Provides mainly a chronological vision of events. Communities do not always have a precise sense of time. Questions
have to be well prepared before starting the exercise. Allow all members to express themselves.
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FACT SHEET
Mapping
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
●
—
—
—
—
●●●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
The purpose of mapping is to gather information about a community by having its members create their own village map.
It is also used to record information about existing problems and to perceive the value given by community members to
certain situations. Community members could draw the map on a sheet of paper, a board or even the soil, and highlight
the following points: main location of settlements and distribution of population including main topography; identification
of health centre, schools, shops, market, church (or other place of worship); location of water points, zones of infection,
or problems with the water source and distribution; location of latrines or garbage disposal; specification of points which
have continuous or seasonal variations in the type of water, or in functioning; location of the population with the lowest
willingness to pay; identification of the economic activities of men and women.
Improved water point in order
Improved water point in poor order
Traditional source
Advantages
■ Provides a common understanding about a village setting and its problems
■ Is very participatory and communities enjoy this work
■ Simple and easy to understand.
Limitations
■ Information might need to be validated in terms of geographical precision
■ Tool needs to be complemented by a problem analysis
■ Requires time.
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FACT SHEET
Venn Diagram
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
●
—
—
—
—
●●●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
The Venn Diagram is a graphic representation which provides a global vision of institutional and social relationships within
and outside a community. It uses circles to represent institutions or groups of people. The size of the circles represents
the importance of the role of these institutions or groups of people (small circle = little importance; medium circle =
medium importance; large circle = major importance). The distance between the circles indicates the relationship
between institutions and groups of people (intersection = collaboration, coordination; touching circles = contacts;
circles apart = distant relationships which increase with the distance between circles). An additional qualification can be
given by lines or arrows between the circles (➤➤➤ = conflict; •••••• = intermittent relationships, etc.).
Donor agency
••
•••
Municipality
•
•••
•••
••
•••
••
•••
•••
Water
Committee
Caretaker
Operator
➤➤
➤➤
➤
Technical
agency
Advantages
■ Provides a rapid and concrete vision of interrelationships and importance of various actors
■ Shows potential problems, and constitutes a basis for further analysis
■ Should be carried out with different groups at different times.
Limitations
■ Very subjective; the results will vary considerably if carried out by community members, or by the agency
■ Information resulting from the discussion must also be recorded.
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FACT SHEET
Community walk
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
●
—
—
—
—
●●●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
A community walk consists in observing community conditions in order to appreciate a situation or to see if goals have
been met, while walking through a community. A community walk can also consist in small visits to families, with informal
discussions about water supply, sanitation, and hygiene, while appreciating the general in-house situation. The community walk should be done in small groups, as large groups attract too much attention. Each group records what it sees,
and should be planned at the time of the day when water and sanitation activities are most relevant. Here is a list of major
relevant points to be observed:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
General environmental condition
Type and state of settlements
State and functioning of water source, distribution and supply
Cleanliness around water points
Hygiene practices for the transport and storage of water
State and functioning of private and public latrines
Evacuation of used water
Garbage disposal
Advantages
■ Direct observation and contact with reality for project staff.
Limitations
■ Needs time
■ Information collected should be well organized, otherwise there is a risk that the information will not be used
■ All information should be recorded in writing, because not everything can be remembered.
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FACT SHEET
Pocket chart
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
●
—
—
—
—
●●●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
The pocket chart is a very effective method to collect information about people’s perceptions, habits, desires and will. It
provides quantitatively valid information by a system of voting, and further allows holding discussions with community
members. The method can be divided into three phases—Phase one: preparation of the tools and explanation to the
community. Phase two: vote. Phase three: discussions.
Simple version
Drawings are prepared in advance, preferably by local artists, to which are attached envelopes. In the case of water
supply, each drawing represents a possible water supply option (or sanitation option or hygiene behaviour, etc. for other
cases). Women are given small pieces of pink (or red) paper (or round stones), while men are given pieces of blue paper.
The facilitator asks the group a first question: “Where do you collect water regularly now?” Community members go and
vote, by putting their piece of paper in the selected envelop. Voting should preferably be done separately, as one person
can influence another. Results are then shared with the group, and discussions are held, asking the community about
their comments and explanations on the results. A second question could be: “Where would you like to go to get your
water?” and follows the same procedure.
Advantages
■ Provides statistical information
■ Very participatory tool; problems can be discussed immediately.
Limitations
■ Acquaintance with the method
■ Community members may not be able to identify themselves with the drawings.
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Matrix version
A matrix is prepared on a large piece of paper, with drawings made locally. Community members are given four small
pieces of coloured paper (as above). The facilitator can ask: “Where does the water you drink come from? Where does
the water you wash your body with come from? Where does the water you wash your clothes with come from? Where
does the water you water your garden with come from?” The results must be shared and discussed. Another series of
questions can be linked to the water source, the community’s plans for its use in the future, and for what purpose.
Advantages
■ Same as above
Limitations
■ Same as above. Also, limitations in the understanding of certain communities about the use of the matrix. The matrix
might seem complicated with too many envelopes. If the situation arises, it is possible to ask community members to
vote row by row.
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FACT SHEET
Priority ranking
Application possibilities in the planning cycle
Vision
Possibilities
for change
Way,
approach
Concept,
strategy
Operational
plan
Plan
adjustments
Monitoring,
evaluation
●●●
●
—
●
—
—
●●●
— least appropriate; ● some appropriateness; ●● appropriate; ●●● very appropriate.
Brief description
In a number of circumstances, choices have to be made, or priorities have to be defined and set. This tool is a decisionmaking tool, which uses a matrix format.
A set of issues, which can be activities or problems, are clearly defined. Then, for example, participants are asked to
choose individually (or in small groups) three issues out of the total and to prioritize them according to criteria which
were previously approved. Choosing in groups can help to discuss the issues more in detail before prioritizing them. The
table below shows two possible ways to determine a priority: (a) through percentage, (b) through mean average.
Example: Determination of priorities on use of water for water improvement
project (n = 10 people or groups participating)
Possible use
of water
No. of people
or groups
who chose
this use (x)
% of people/
groups who
selected this
issue (x/n %)
Priority
given to
this use
(y)
Mean average
for priority
given
(y/n)
Drinking
10
100
1,2,1,2,1,1,1,2,1,1
1.3
Cooking
9
90
2,1,2,3,2,3,2,3,2,4
2.4
Washing body
5
50
4,5,2,3,4,3,3,3,4,5
3.6
Washing clothes
6
60
4,4,5,3,2,4,3,5,4,4
3.8
Cleaning the environment
2
20
5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,4,5
4.9
Gardening
7
70
2,3,2,3,2,3,2,3,2,3
2.5
Brewery
3
30
5,4,5,4,5,5,5,5,4,5,
4.7
Other (to be specified)
2
20
4,5,5,5,5,5,5,4,5,5
4.8
According to the percentage and the mean average, the first three priorities selected are: drinking, cooking and gardening. If there is any doubt, the matter should be discussed within the group.
Advantages
■ Helps to make a decision democratically
■ Concrete and can be quantified.
Limitations
■ Participants may not agree on criteria for selection and prioritization
■ Use of matrix could be complex in certain communities.
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Unit 8: Field visit
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To assess the operation and maintenance status of water supply and sanitation
facilities within a community
■ To analyse the field visit results
➽ Methodology
1. Field visit
2. Analysis in the classroom
➽ Materials
✔ Transport for the visit
✔ A small notebook for each participant
✔ Suitable clothing for field work
✔ Flip chart and markers for class work
➽ Handouts
✔ Information about the community
✔ Exercise sheet
2. Notes for the facilitator
Preparation
The purpose of the field visit is to give the participants an opportunity to look at the
operation and maintenance arrangements in a particular community. The actual programme will depend on the distance to be travelled for the visit, the size of the local
community and the extent of their cooperation with the organizers of the course. The
participants may have to be divided into small groups to work more efficiently and to
reduce inconveniences to the community.
The communities should be contacted well in advance to fix the date and timing of
the visit and to ensure that the local committee and some users will be ready to receive
the participants. The community should be fully briefed on the visit and its objectives
and given details of the programme that will be followed. Arrangements have to be made
for transport and refreshments during the visit.
If a community is large enough to accept the full group, then only one community
need be contacted for the visit. But if the group of participants is very large, it may be
necessary to allocate smaller groups to different communities. In this case, more effort
and time will be needed to make the preparations so that all the visits will be well organized. The participants in the small groups will have the chance of comparing the different communities visited in the same locality. This exercise may reveal different aspects of
O&M, which will be of value to the participants.
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The visits should be made in the morning. This will be followed by a general meeting
in the afternoon where all the groups will meet the district staff of the government agency
responsible for water and sanitation. The participants will be able to meet separately the
users, local operators and caretakers, community leaders and government staff. Within
each community visited, the participants in their groups will observe and interview each
of the above actors, if possible on their own, to avoid influencing each other’s responses.
Choosing a morning visit will increase the value of the field visit as a whole. This is
because many of the activities associated with rural water supply take place early in the
morning. For example, women traditionally collect water before or at sunrise. And
operators open the valves, start the pumps, dose the tanks with chlorine, etc. at the start
of the day in order to have sufficient water for early collection. The next peak of water
collection may be in the late afternoon/early evening, which will be too late for the field
visit. Arrangements have to be made to ensure an early arrival in the community or communities selected for the visit, so that participants should prepare themselves for an early
start!
Proposed programme for the field visit
1. Arrival to start the field visit
2. Discussion for 11/2 hours with the representatives of the Water Committee
3. Visit to a water supply treatment plant or pumps, and meeting with the caretaker
and operator (1 hour)
4. Division in smaller groups (by geographical area, for example)
5. Each group goes for a walk within the community, making general observations
(environmental sanitation), visiting users in their homes, asking them questions
about the water supply, visiting the latrines and observing their state of hygiene (1
hour).
Analysis of the field results
Once back in the classroom on the same day, or the next day, each small group will do a
SWOT analysis (see pages 249, 267), and then report back in a plenary session. The final
results can be sent to the community with a letter of thanks.
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3. Exercise sheets: Exercise sheet 1
Check-list for field visit
1. Environmental aspects
Protection and preservation of the water source and water point
Quantity and quality of the water
Wastewater management
Environmental sanitation
2. Community aspects
Structure and functioning of the community organization
Participation of women
Ownership feeling
Satisfaction of users
Management capacity of the committee
Technical capacity within the community
3. Technical aspects
Complexity of operation and maintenance of the system
Spare parts availability
Training received by the operator
Dependency on chemicals and fuel
Preventive maintenance
Tools
Water quality control
4. Institutional factors
Technical assistance
Monitoring and follow-up
Relationship with the municipality and other actors
5. Financial factors
Tariff, and what does the tariff cover?
How are other costs financed?
Non-payments, and sanctions
Willingness to pay
Financial management
Use of funds
6. Processes
How was the project introduced?
How did the community participate?
7. Observations
Domestic hygiene and hygienic state of latrines
Environmental sanitation in general
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267
Exercise sheet 2
Field visit analysis
Field visit results will be analysed by the SWOT
(Successes—Weaknesses—Opportunities—Threats) method.
1. Analysis of the present situation
What are the successes in terms
of operation and maintenance
(see check-list)?
What are the weaknesses in
terms of operation and
maintenance (see check-list)?
2. Analysis of the future situation
On the basis of the successes
and weaknesses of the present
situation, what are the
opportunities/potentialities to
improve the O&M situation?
On the basis of the present
situation, and the general context,
what are the possible threats or
obstacles which the community
will have to face?
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268
4. Background information
4.1 Recording observations
It is not possible to remember everything, especially when making observations in a short
period of time. The observations during a field visit should therefore be recorded in a
notebook. The recording of observations lessens the pressure to make an interpretation
before all the facts are known. Observations should be recorded first, interpretations can
be made later.
The person making the observation can influence the situation being observed. For
example, participants must often be aware that their presence in the village influences
the behaviour of the people. The fact that the field visit was organized in advance may
lead the community to make a special effort to clean the well surroundings. As visitors
attract attention, people may act to satisfy the visitor rather than in their natural manner.
Participants should remember this when making their observations and drawing conclusions.
4.2 Interviews
Two types of interviews can be used in information collection.
Free interviews
In a free interview, the topic is introduced but the discussion and subject details are left
to the respondent to decide. In this way the interviewer gets a good idea of what the
respondent thinks is important, not what the interviewer has decided is important. However, the interviewer has to be a good listener and questioner. Questions have to motivate
the respondent and must be followed by carefully worded further questions, which do
not reflect any bias the interviewer may have. This type of interview is for field workers
who have considerable experience in their work and in interviewing.
Focused interviews
For a focused interview, a list of items is prepared and the respondent is asked to provide
information on each one. A checklist will help to ensure that all items are covered and
that the interviewer is not diverted away from the essential information required.
In the course of a focused interview it may happen that the respondent may give
information or want to discuss an issue which is not on the list. It is important to give
respondents the opportunity to contribute their own thoughts; this can be done at the
end of the interview after going through the checklist first.
In the short time of an interview, it may not be possible to collect accurate quantitative data. Questions requiring answers on the numbers of this or that may be included in
a focused interview, but the participants should be realistic about the answers they will
get. They should not expect that community members and caretakers will be able to give
quantitative information immediately. As records may be private, the participants should
ask to see any log books and record sheets only if the people seem willing to show them.
Participants should be careful in choosing the persons they interview. They may ask a
user how often the system breaks down and the caretaker about any difficulties in maintenance activities. It is sometimes instructive to put the same questions to different
persons. For example, to the question, “How often has the system broken down?”, the
caretaker’s answer may give the impression of a job well done, while the user’s answer
may highlight the problems in the hope of getting an improvement.
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Aids to effective interviewing
The following suggestions will help the interviewer in the collection of information:
■
■
■
Prepare a checklist. As with focused interviews, prepare a checklist of items relating to the information required. The list does not have to be detailed but serves as
a guide. Use key words as a way to remember the main points and particularly
important pieces of information.
Introduce yourself. Participants may feel under pressure to gather as much information as they can in a short period of time. They should not rush in with a long
list of questions, but first introduce themselves and briefly explain the object of the
field visit. It is important to allay the community’s fears and indicate how the information will be used. If there is a feeling, for example, that the answers may result in
higher water bills, the community’s attitude will naturally be cautious.
Move from general to specific. It is recommended to start with more general
questions and then move to specific questions. General questions help to set the
context for the more specific questions. This will help to avoid misunderstandings
about the purpose of the interview.
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MODULE 4
Planning
Unit 1: Planning tools
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheets
273
273
273
275
Unit 2: Individual assignments
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheet
284
284
284
286
Unit 3: Presentations
1. Outline of session
2. Notes for the facilitator
3. Overhead sheet
4. Background information
4.1 Communication versus information
4.2 Preparing a conference
4.3 Physical expression
4.4 Structure of the presentation
4.5 Use of audiovisual material
4.6 Discussion
287
287
287
289
290
290
290
290
291
291
292
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Unit 1: Planning tools
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To review existing planning tools
■ To get acquainted with the planning phase of the OOPP (Objective Oriented Project
Planning)
■ To develop a planning matrix
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Focused discussion on existing planning tools
3. Presentation on the OOPP planning matrix
4. Group exercise on development of the planning matrix
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Large sheet of (craft) paper for drawing the planning matrix
✔ Cards (thick paper) for filling in the matrix
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of all transparencies
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
This fourth module deals with planning issues and introduces a planning methodology
derived from the OOPP (Objective Oriented Project Planning), as mentioned in
Module 2 (see page 110). Participants will be required to carry out individual or group
work based on their own situations and on what they have learnt so far in the course.
Focused discussion on existing planning tools
The facilitator asks the participants to describe the planning tools they use in their work
and writes the main points on the flip chart. This session could, if needed, utilize some of
the ideas learnt in the session on working and planning with communities (Module 3,
Unit 7, see page 234). Indeed some of the tools, which were extensively described, can be
used at this stage if necessary.
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Presentation on the OOPP planning matrix
The facilitator describes the various sequences of the second part of the OOPP methodology using the overhead sheets. The planning matrix is linked with the work done with
the objective tree.
Group exercise on development of the planning matrix
The facilitator recalls the results obtained earlier with the objective tree and the strategic
objectives selected, and prepares the following on the large sheet of paper on the wall;
this is an adapted version of the original OOPP or ZOPP (see overhead sheets, below).
The facilitator asks the participants to select the main objective, which comes from
the objective tree, as one of the higher main objectives. The group should then determine the overall objective of the programme or project, its contribution to sustainability,
improved health status, etc.
The results correspond to the priority objectives, which were identified in the strategy
selection earlier in the course, right after the construction of the objective tree. The
suppositions can also be derived from the tree, as objectives which are more difficult to
reach or as objectives which are critical; some other suppositions include political will,
access to financial resources, coordination between actors, etc. It is actually quite easy to
build a planning matrix, once a preliminary analysis has been done. The main components are derived directly from the objective tree.
The facilitator then divides the participants into small groups (the number of groups
will depend on the number of results identified), each group having the task of identifying the main activities (maximum of seven) which will lead to the result. They will also be
asked to determine the indicators and the means of verification for each indicator. The
groups present their results in a plenary session by pinning or sticking the corresponding cards on the matrix (on the wall). The facilitator should encourage the participants
to comment on and propose other activities if needed.
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3. Overhead sheets: Sheet 1
Planning phase
A. Elaboration of the planning matrix
B. Identification of important suppositions
C. Identification of activities which will lead to the
results
D. Formulation of indicators
E. Determination of resources
F. Checking of the matrix sequence
G. Elaboration of a time schedule
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Overhead sheet 2
0 Elaboration of the planning matrix
1. Selection of the main objective from the
objective tree
2. Selection of the overall objective (top part of
the objective tree)
3. Identification of the main results that will
contribute to the main objective (from the
strategic analysis). The results must be
independent.
4. Construction of the structure of the matrix
(see next page)
Result 1
Result 2
Resources needed: human, financial, equipment
Activities
Means of
verification
Indicators
Results
Main
objective
Overall
objective
Result 3
Result 4
Result 5
Result 6
Result 7
Suppositions
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Overhead sheet 3
1 Identification of important
suppositions
1. Identify conditions for the development of the
project
2. Identify conditions for the sustainability of the
main objective
3. Evaluate the probability of reaching the
results, without project intervention
4. Write down the conditions or suppositions in
the matrix
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Overhead sheet 4
2 Identification of activities which will
lead to the achievement of the results
1. Identify some of the objectives in the objective
tree which can be reformulated as activities
2. Identify other activities which will lead to the
result
3. Prioritize activities and place them below the
result to be achieved
4. If the project is ongoing:
— Check if the activities can be included in
the project
— If this is not possible, some other results
may need to be identified
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Overhead sheet 5
3 Determination of indicators
(See session on monitoring, pages 216, 229)
1. Formulate indicators for each result to be
reached (responding to the following
characteristics: What? How much? When?
Who? Where?)
2. Identify the means of verification, including
external information sources
3. Place the indicators under each result in the
matrix
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Overhead sheet 6
4 Determination of resources
1. Determine the human, financial and technical
resources which are necessary to develop the
activities
2. Determine the costs for each of the needed
resources
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Overhead sheet 7
5 Check the sequence of the matrix
1. Check if the results are sufficient to reach the
objective
2. Check if the activities are sufficient in order to
reach the results, and the formulation of the
indicators
3. Determine possible ways to overcome
conditions and suppositions, as well as
possible resistances to change, and the ways
to resolve them
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Overhead sheet 8
6 Elaboration of the time schedule
1. Elaboration of a general time plan for the
duration of the programme or project, with the
major activities (long term)
2. Elaboration of an action plan (short term) of
immediate activities for the next six months,
which are necessary to start the programme
and project
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Unit 2: Individual assignments
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To identify themes for individual assignments
■ To develop the problem and objective trees
■ To develop a planning matrix
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Choosing the themes for the individual assignments
3. Individual work with coaching
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Material for the participants (white sheets, and small coloured cards for making the
trees and planning matrix)
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of all transparencies
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
This session covers ground from several previous ones, and its purpose is to apply all that
has been learnt into projects which the participants will develop by themselves, with
some assistance from the facilitator. It is an essential feature of the course that it allows
each participant to develop, with guidance, a project proposal which focuses on the
problem of operation and maintenance.
Choosing the themes for the individual assignments
Already on the previous day, the facilitator should have asked the participants to propose
themes for their project assignments, because they may need time to think about it. The
following criteria will guide the selection:
■
■
■
■
The theme should be about any of the issues related to operation and maintenance, as presented in the course.
The theme is chosen from one’s own professional experience.
The theme should be phrased as a problem.
The problem should be formulated as precisely as possible, thus avoiding general
statements.
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■
■
The problem should, directly or indirectly, be part of the participant’s project.
The findings of the individual assignment should be able to influence, directly or
indirectly, the problem situation.
Each identified theme and problem is written on a card. If some participants are
unable to select a theme, they are asked to describe their professional work and any
problems, and the facilitator helps them to formulate the problem, following the abovementioned criteria. If they so desire, participants from the same project or department
could work together on a single assignment.
Individual work with coaching
The participants are asked to analyse their problem and draw a problem tree, similar to
the objective tree and planning matrix, using the given materials (paper, small cards and
tape). As this work needs concentration and time, the facilitator tries to create a good
working atmosphere and enough space for each participant to develop his or her own
project. It could be useful to display on the wall the sheets describing the assignments.
The individual assignments need personal guidance and assistance, or “coaching” by
the facilitator. Coaching does not mean watching, controlling, or telling the participants
what to do. It requires the facilitator to spend some time with the participants, guiding
them in their work, helping them to broaden their thinking, reminding them about the
working procedure and methodologies, and stimulating them. As one person alone could
not possibly coach a big group, it is absolutely necessary to have a course assistant who is
acquainted with the OOPP methodology to help with the coaching. Participants who
work fast could also be asked to help others. Experience has shown that some participants have difficulties in analysing their problem in a logical way. It is essential, in such
cases, to go over the methodology and also propose some “short cuts”, e.g. grouping
identified problems by entity (technical, institutional, financing, community, legal, etc.).
An analysis is made within each entity, keeping in mind that these entities have a direct
impact on the main problem.
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3. Overhead sheet
Criteria for the identification of
themes for individual assignments
● The theme should be about an issue related to
management, operation and maintenance.
● The theme is chosen from one’s own professional
work.
● The theme should be phrased as a problem.
● The problem should be formulated as precisely as
possible, avoiding general statements.
● The problem should be part of the project in which
the participant is working, directly or indirectly.
● The findings in the assignments should be able to
influence, directly or indirectly, the solving of the
problem.
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Unit 3: Presentations
1. Outline of session
➽ Objectives
■ To show the presentation techniques
■ To develop individual presentations
■ To offer the presentations and receive feedback from the audience
➽ Methodology
1. Introductory note
2. Small lecture on presentation techniques
3. Preparation of individual presentations
4. Presentations
➽ Materials
✔ Overhead transparencies
✔ Flip chart and masking tape
✔ Overhead projector, screen or white wall
✔ Material for the participants (white sheets, cards, markers, transparencies, possibly
computers, Powerpoint)
➽ Handouts
✔ Copies of all transparencies
2. Notes for the facilitator
Introductory note
This is the final part of the course, where the participants present the results of their
work before a panel of colleagues and receive feedback, suggestions and recommendations. It is also the opportunity to brush up some of the presentation skills, which are
useful in their professional work. Communication is essential in promoting one’s work.
A project can have the most perfect design, but a professional must also be able to communicate to his team and colleagues its main elements and objectives. Communication
helps to make the project come alive.
Small lecture on presentation techniques
The facilitator reminds the participants about the basic principles on presentation techniques and gives advice and some hints on how to organize their presentation in an
effective way, using the overhead sheets and background information (see below).
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Preparation of individual presentations
The participants’ presentations should reflect as much as possible the main elements of
their individual assignments. Material can be prepared using transparencies, sheets,
markers, and possibly a computer. The facilitator should remind the participants that
they will have 15 minutes for each presentation and 15 minutes to answer questions and
for discussion.
Presentations
Rigorous time control is essential. If there are many presentations, they could be grouped
by similar themes, and two or three could be given one after the other. Questions and
discussion can then follow for all of them together.
Some hints to keep good control of time are given below:
■
■
■
■
■
Prepare in advance a detailed programme. This is given to the participants only
just before the presentations, so that everyone comes fully prepared without knowing who will be the first one to start.
Ask one of the participants to help you keep track of time.
Show a yellow card when there are three minutes left, and a red card when it is
time to conclude.
Keep watch on the focus of the discussions.
Follow the programme you prepared, as far as possible.
of
of the
parts of
the presentation
● Various
topic
● Background
topic and its
interest
● Introduction
of who
you are and what
you do
● Introduction
● Greetings
Introduction
for the analysis
with examples
● Arguments
● Description
problems which are
linked with the topic
● Main
Problem analysis
the strategy
● Explanation
for choosing
objectives or possible
solutions to resolve the
problem
● Main
Objectives/possible
solutions
Content of presentation
Proposed structure for a presentation
3. Overhead sheet
obstacles which the
project could be facing, and
how to resolve them
● Possible
of the main
activities which are planned
to solve the situation
● Description
Plan of action
of
discussion, with
a question or a
comment
● Start
messages
for the
audience to
remember
after the
presentation
● Key
review of
the main points
of the content
of the
presentation
● Rapid
Conclusion
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4. Background information1
4.1 Communication versus information
Communication should not be mistaken for information. The person who informs puts
across a series of ideas, experiences and concepts to a public who cannot respond. In this
case, the public is invisible, receiving the information through a mass media tool, without any kind of personal relationship.
On the other hand, a person who communicates has the immediate possibility of
exchanging ideas, experiences and concepts with the audience. Communication is very
important in the process of project development, since there is not a single situation
which can be resolved by only one actor; a project needs exchange and relationships
between a variety of persons and actors.
4.2 Preparing a conference
Sufficient time should be given for preparing the conference, keeping in mind:
■
■
■
■
The time allowed for the conference
The target audience
The topic of the presentation
The objectives of the presentation.
Short conferences are the most difficult ones to prepare, because the presentation
has to be comprehensive, clear and get to the point rapidly. It also takes some time to
relate to the audience.
For small groups of 5–6 persons, the presentation can be in the form of a conversation; the audiovisual material can be limited to graphics or simple drawings. One should
keep in mind that time should be allowed for possibly frequent interventions by the
audience.
Presentations to groups of 10–30 persons are more common. It is important always to
have unimpeded visibility between the participants and the lecturer, because this contributes to better communication. The seating in the room can be arranged in advance
to make the audience feel at ease.
4.3 Physical expression
Good communication does not arise spontaneously, but is the result of interacting to
changes of attitudes in the audience. The lecturer uses the audiovisual material as well as
his or her body as a communication tool, such as for example:
■
■
■
■
■
1
The tone of the voice and diction must be clear.
The space between the lecturer and the audience is important, because it can make
or break the level of communication; someone who always stands far from the
front of the audience, or always by the flipchart or the blackboard, cannot communicate well.
The hands help to emphasize what is spoken. It may be annoying to see a lecturer
with his or her hands in the pockets all the time.
Abrupt movements can break the concentration of the audience. By being calm
and constant, a lecturer facilitates integration with the audience.
The art of pedagogy gives importance to the face. The lecturer should always be
turned to face the audience, without fixing on only one person.
Adapted from: Presentación de conferencias by Diana Margarita Valquez, CINARA/IRC course material 1995, Cali, Colombia.
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4.4 Structure of the presentation
A well structured presentation increases its effectiveness. Indeed, it would be unjust to
ask the audience to make the effort of organizing your lecture in their minds.
The presentation is organized according to a format which can be found in the overhead sheet, and is divided into:
1. Introduction, in which the lecturer greets the participants, introduces him/herself,
and presents the subject and its interest.
2. Development of content, which has three parts:
— An analysis of the problems, showing the main problems which are linked with the
topic, with some examples.
— An analysis of the possible solutions to overcome the problems, with some examples
and an explanation about what would be the best strategy and why.
— An action plan, presenting the main activities to be implemented.
3. Conclusion: a brief overview of the main points, key messages concerning the subject
which the audience should remember, and a few remarks to facilitate the discussion.
4.5 Use of audiovisual material
The use of audiovisual material is highly recommended, and is meant mainly to assist
your presentation by raising the major ideas and key words. It is important to spend
some time before a presentation to become familiar with the equipment, and to look for
assistance if needed.
Flip charts
— Can be filled in during the presentation, as a means of highlighting the main ideas.
— Can be prepared before the presentation with drawings or text; it is possible to refer
to previous sheets, if needed.
— Can be used to keep records of discussions.
— Cannot be used for an audience larger than 30 persons.
— If sheets are prepared in advance, first make a plan on a small sheet, indicating what
is going to be on the large sheet; use concise language, which will be further developed verbally; on each sheet develop one major idea; letters should have a height of
at least 3 cm; it is advised to use dark colours, as it is difficult to read yellow, orange or
red from far away; you can make small annotations on the sheet in pencil to help you
remember what to say; when you don’t use the flip chart, put up a blank sheet in
order to avoid distraction.
OOPP material
It is strongly advised to avoid presenting the problem and objective trees, which have
been made in a small format during the individual assignments, because a) it is almost
impossible to read what is written on the cards; and b) the audience does not have the
time to go through the whole process of analytical thinking which the lecturer (or
participant giving the presentation) has made. Instead, select some major elements and
ideas, and prepare larger cards which can be read from a distance.
Overhead transparencies
— Can be used to make a synthesis of ideas and to present to the audience their logical
sequence.
— Can be used to present specific data.
— Can be used to keep the attention of the audience.
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Should be avoided:
— Use of too much writing on a transparency, which will distract the audience from
what you are saying.
— Writing with letters of small size.
— Photocopies from a textbook or a report, which is often difficult to read from a
distance.
— Use of too many transparencies.
4.6 Discussion
A presentation is generally followed by a discussion. There are various forms of responses
from an audience: questions for clarification, comments and recommendations,
criticisms, silence.
Questions for clarification should be anticipated in advance if possible, because the
audience may ask for explanations of specific elements or about the context. However, it
is possible that you may not know the answer to the question; in such a case, you can put
the question to the audience and ask another participant to respond, or say that you
have noted the question for further clarification at a later stage.
Comments and recommendations are welcome, but they can sometimes be out of
context; it is important to keep the focus on the topic. Key recommendations should be
noted down. Critical comments are normal, and should also be anticipated. The lecturer
should not try to defend his or her views, but calmly present the reasons for this choice.
If arguments arise in an uncomfortable way, you can propose having a discussion on this
topic at a later stage.
Silence in the audience is sometimes heavy to bear after a lecturer’s presentation.
One can put questions to the audience. If the silence persists, it is usually because the
question was not well understood, or out of context. The question should then be
rephrased.
Good luck !
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