...

Getting Started with Searching in Laserfiche 8.2.pdf

by user

on
Category: Documents
1

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

Getting Started with Searching in Laserfiche 8.2.pdf
Getting Started with Searching
in the Laserfiche 8.2 Client
White Paper
April 2011
The information contained in this document represents the current view of
Compulink Management Center, Inc on the issues discussed as of the date of
publication. Because Compulink must respond to changing market conditions, it
should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Compulink, and
Compulink cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the
date of publication.
This chapter is for informational purposes only. COMPULINK MAKES NO
WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS
DOCUMENT.
1
Table of Contents
Introduction to Searching .....................................................................................3
Search Types .........................................................................................................3
Quick Search ......................................................................................................3
Basic Search ......................................................................................................4
Within Folder .....................................................................................................4
Field ...................................................................................................................5
Text ....................................................................................................................6
Modification Date ...............................................................................................7
Document/Folder Name....................................................................................7
Electronic Files ..................................................................................................7
Tags ...................................................................................................................8
Relationship .......................................................................................................8
Version ...............................................................................................................8
User ...................................................................................................................9
Within Volume....................................................................................................9
Pages .................................................................................................................9
Advanced..........................................................................................................10
Search Tips ..........................................................................................................10
Saving Searches ..............................................................................................10
Context Lines ...................................................................................................10
Search Within Search Results.........................................................................12
Relevance Ranking ..........................................................................................12
Fuzzy Search....................................................................................................12
Wildcards .........................................................................................................14
Records Management Searches .....................................................................14
2
Introduction to Searching
You can quickly locate documents in your Laserfiche repository by searching
for them. The Laserfiche Client’s Search Pane allows you to search based on a
variety of criteria.
To begin, click the Search button. This will open the Search Pane
on the left where you can configure and view your search criteria;
your search results will be returned in the right pane.
To choose search criteria, click Customize Search, select the search type you
want to use, and type your search terms in the text box that opens for that
search type. You can combine multiple search types to refine your search
further. Once you have input your search terms, click the Search button to
begin searching.
Search Types
Quick Search
A Quick Search, located in the Folder Browser, allows you to search text,
fields, entry names, annotation
text, or a combination of these
elements without opening the Search Pane. It is an OR search, meaning one
OR the other of the selected criteria must be met. For instance, you could
perform a document text and field search for “Shakespeare.” This search will
3
return all documents that have the word “Shakespeare” in a field, in
document text, or in both a field and document text. By default, when using
the Quick Search for fields, entry names, and/or annotation text, partial
matches will be returned. This means the asterisk (*) wildcard (representing
missing or no missing characters) is implied.
Note: Partial matches will not be returned for document text
searches within the Quick Search unless Fuzzy search is
enabled. To enable Fuzzy search click on Tools and select
Options. Expand the Search node and select General. Select the
Use Fuzzy check box.
When more than one repository is attached to the Client, use the Choose
Repository drop-down menu to select the repository you want to search.
Basic Search
The Basic Search performs in
the same manner and with the
same options as the Quick
Search. It is the first search type
displayed, by default, when
opening the Search Pane.
Note: Annotation text searches can only be performed using the
Basic or Quick Search.
Note: Partial matches will not be returned for document text
searches within the Basic Search unless Fuzzy search is
enabled. To enable Fuzzy search click on Tools and select
Options. Expand the Search node and select General. Select the
Use Fuzzy check box.
Within Folder
The Within Folder search type
returns results located in one or more
specified folders. You can combine
this search with another search, for
instance, document/folder name
search, or you can use this search
independently to return all entries
within or not in a specific folder.
Click the … button to browse to the folder. You can search in the Current
folder, to search in the folder you are currently viewing, or in Selected
folders. Click the Add button to search in additional selected folders. If you
select the Include subfolders check box, the search will also return results
from the selected folders’ subfolders.
4
Field
The Field Search searches fields
and/or templates assigned to entries in
your repository. If you search by
template, all of the returned
document’s template field values will
be displayed in columns in the search
results. If you search by field, the field
values will not be displayed
automatically.
•
To return all entries that
contain a specified field value,
select Search across selected
fields and select a field from the Choose Fields list. You can search for
multiple field values at the same time by selecting more than one field
in this list. Type the field value you want to find in the text box below
the field. This will search all instances of the field regardless if it is
included in a template or not.
Note: If you choose to search across fields and do not type
anything in the text box below the selected field, you will
get an invalid search error.
•
To return all entries that have a specified template and/or a specified
field value within a template, select Search by template and select a
template from the drop-down menu. Type the field value(s) you want
to find in the text box(es) below fields in the template. The search will
return an entry if it has the selected template and has a template field
value matching what you typed. If you type search terms in more than
one field, the search will return documents only if their template field
values match all of the values you typed.
Note: If you search by template but do not type anything
in the fields, the search will return all entries with that
template.
Field searches are useful for finding documents based on the specific kinds of
information that you or other users in your organization have configured. For
instance, if you keep track of the author of a document using an Author field,
you can quickly find all documents by John Smith by searching for
documents with “John Smith” in the Author field.
Note: By default, the search will return only exact matches. For
example, if you typed “Quinn” in the Author field of the above
search, a document with “Quinn Thomas” in the Author field
5
will not be returned. You can add wildcards to your search to
return more than just exact matches.
Text
The Text search type allows you
to locate words in the text of
documents that have text
associated with them. This search
is useful for ensuring that certain
words or phrases are included in
or excluded from your search.
There are five different text search options:
6
•
PHRASE: Searches for a single word or phrase in the text, much like
Quick Search or Basic Search can be configured to do.
•
AND: Searches for all documents that contain two specified words or
phrases. When you select the AND option, a Second phrase text box
will appear for you to input your second word or phrase. Only
documents that contain both words/phrases will be returned
•
OR: Searches for all documents that contain one of two specified words
or phrases. When you select the OR option, a Second phrase text box
will appear for you to input your second word or phrase. For example,
if you search for “Dog” OR “Cat,” documents will be returned that
contain “Dog,” “Cat,” or both “Dog” and “Cat.”
•
NOT: Searches for all documents that contain the first specified word
or phrase but not the second one. When you select the NOT option, a
Second phrase text box will appear for you to input your second word
or phrase. This type of text search is useful for focusing your search.
For example, you can search for “King” NOT “Henry,” and all
documents containing “King” will be returned except for the
documents with both “King” and “Henry” in them.
•
WITHIN: Searches for all documents that contain both specified words
or phrases within a particular number of words of each other. When
you select the WITHIN option, a Second phrase text box will appear
for you to input your second word or phrase. For example, you want to
search for documents about professors at Stanford. You can search for
documents that have the word “professors” within five words of the
word “Stanford.” This search will help you avoid returning documents
that talk about professors and Stanford in two unrelated portions of the
document.
Modification Date
The Modification Date search
type allows you to search for
documents modified or created
during a specific period. You can
specify whether you want to
search by modification or
creation date by selecting the “Modification Date” or “Creation Date” check
boxes. You can type dates in the From and To options, or you can click the
calendar icon to browse to a particular date. If you leave one of the date boxes
empty, the search will be open-ended. For instance, if you type a date in the
From option but not the To option, you will retrieve all documents created or
modified on or after the date specified in From. If you type a date in the To
option but not the From option, you will retrieve all documents created or
modified on or before the date specified in To.
Note: A Modification Date search type includes the start and end
dates in the search.
Document/Folder Name
The Document/Folder Name
search type allows you to locate
entries with a particular name.
This search type is useful if you
remember all or part of the name of the item you want to retrieve. This search
type will match the phrase you search for exactly, so you will need to use
wildcards to search for part of a document name. (For more information, see
“Wildcards,” below.) For instance, searching for “Government Technology”
will return documents and folders named “Government Technology,” but will
not return a document called “Government Technology 05/07/2008.” Instead,
you would need to search for “Government Technology*” to find all
documents whose names begin with the words Government Technology. You
can also specify to return documents only, folders only, shortcuts only, or
some combination of these entries.
Electronic Files
The Electronic Files search type
allows you to specify whether you
want to retrieve electronic
documents only (documents with
associated electronic files) or
Laserfiche documents with no
associated electronic files. If you
select Find documents with an
electronic file component, you can
7
specify the electronic file types you want returned. The with one of the
following extensions list contains the extensions of all the electronic files on
the Laserfiche Server. (To select more than one extension type, hold the CTRL
key at the same time as you click on the extensions.) For instance, if you are
looking for a report saved as an Excel spreadsheet, you can use this search
type to restrict your results to Excel spreadsheets. You can also constrain your
search by file size.
Tags
The Tags search type allows you
to find all documents that have
been assigned a particular tag. For
instance, you can create a tag to
mark items as high priority and
search for that tag to locate highpriority documents. This search
works with both informational
and security tags. If you select
more than one tag, the Find entries with option allows you to determine if
you want to return documents with at least one of the selected tags or if you
want to restrict your search to documents that have all the selected tags. If you
use tag comments, you can also search for documents with tag comments
containing a certain word or phrase.
Note: If a user does not have access to a security tag, that tag will
not appear in the list.
Relationship
The Relationship search type
allows you to find all documents
with a particular document link
relationship. For instance, if you
wanted to find all documents that
were linked as attachments to email messages, you could select the “Attachment” link type from the list. The
Find documents with option allows you to determine if you want to return
documents with at least one of the selected links or if you want to restrict
your search to documents that have all the selected links.
Version
The Version search allows you
to search for a particular word
or phrase within version
comments.
8
Note: A match will be found if the word or phrase occurs
anywhere in the comment. For example, searching for “signed”
returns comments with “assigned.” Wildcards are not needed.
User
The User search type returns
documents created by, owned
by, or checked out by a specific
user (tracked by user login
name). For instance, if you
wanted to return a document
Bob created, type “Bob” in the text box and select the Created By check box.
If searching by creator, the search will return document and folder shortcuts
created by the specified user. You can use wildcards with this search type.
Note: To search for Windows domain accounts use the
Domain\Username format.
Within Volume
The Within Volume search type
returns documents that are in
the specified volume or
volumes. Select the volume or
volumes you want to search
within from the list. Select
multiple volumes by holding down the CTRL key. If you select multiple
volumes, this search type will perform an OR search.
Pages
The Pages search type allows
you to search for documents by
number of Laserfiche pages
and/or by number of Laserfiche
pages with OCRed text on them.
•
Contain returns all documents that have more than, exactly, less than,
or between a specified number of imaged pages.
•
Contain OCRed text on -- pages allows you to specify whether to return
documents with text pages. This search can be important to identify
documents that were not OCRed during the scanning or import process.
o no pages: Only documents with no generated text will be
returned.
o some: Documents will be returned if they have generated text for
some but not all pages.
9
o all: Documents will be returned if they have text for all pages.
Advanced
The Advanced search type allows
you to view the advanced search
syntax for searches performed. You
can also modify the string and/or
add your own search syntax to your
search by selecting the Include
advanced search criteria in query
check box.
Search Tips
Saving Searches
Saving a search allows you to easily perform the same search multiple times
without having to reconfigure search types or terms. For example, you
frequently want to find and review product reports that were written by Frank
and tagged as urgent. Instead of reconfiguring the User (Frank), Tags (Urgent),
and Document Name (*product report*) search types each time you want to
find those reports, you can save a search for “Frank’s Urgent Reports.”
To save a search, configure the desired search types and click Save at the top
of the Search Pane. Enter a name for your search, and click OK. To run a
saved search, click Load at the top of the Search Pane, select a saved search
from the list, and click OK. The saved search types will appear in the Search
Pane. Click Search at the bottom of the pane to perform the saved search.
Context Lines
Context lines make it easy to view where search terms occur in a document,
to open directly to a search term, and to move quickly between search hits in
a document. Annotation searches produce context lines with icons showing
the type of annotation.
10
When you perform a full-text search, the context lines where the term appears
in the document will be displayed in the bottom pane of the Search Results
window.
Note: By default, context lines are displayed, but they can be
toggled on or off. To show or hide context lines, click on Tools
and select Options. Expand the Search node, and select Results
Display. Check or clear the Show context lines check box.
Within each context line, the search term and the page number will be bold.
The context presented can help you determine if the document or section of
the document is what you are looking for. You can double-click on the
context lines to open the document. If the result is for a Laserfiche document
or an electronic document with imaged pages, double-clicking the context
lines will open the Document Viewer and take you directly to the page or
annotation with that particular instance of the search term. All instances of
the search term will be highlighted in the document, and the instance you
used to open the document will be selected. If the search term is in an
electronic document without imaged pages, double-clicking on the context
line will open the document’s text pages and the search term will be
highlighted.
You can move forward or backward through the search terms highlighted in a
document to scan for the section of the document you are looking for. Click
the F3 key to go to the next hit, or the SHIFT+F3 key to go to the previous hit.
For instance, if you were looking for the line “Farewell, Ophelia; and
remember well…” in the play Hamlet, you could search for the word
“Ophelia” and then select the context line that reads “Farewell, Ophelia…”,
which will take you to that quote in the document. By clicking F3, you could
move quickly to the next instances of the word Ophelia until you located the
line you were looking for.
11
Search Within Search Results
Further refine your search results by searching a current set of search results.
Searching a set of search results is much quicker than conducting a new
search. For example, you are looking for an expense report filed last year. You
do a Basic search for “expense report,” but realize that too many entries are
returned for you to find the one you want quickly. You can refine the results
by adding a Modification Date search for documents created in the last year
and clicking Refine results. Unlike conducting a new search each time, these
“refining” searches only search within the results returned by the “expense
report” Basic search.
To search within a set of search results, conduct a search that returns a
number of results, edit the search options in the Search Pane, and click Refine
results at the bottom of the Search Pane.
Relevance Ranking
A search result’s relevance ranking score tells you how well a document
matches your search criteria. Each full-text search result is given a relevance
ranking score. Sorting by relevance ranking allows you to find quickly the
entries you want.
After performing a full-text search, display the Relevance Ranking column in
the Search Results pane. (This column is shown by default after a full-text
search is performed.) The result ranked number 1 is the most relevant entry.
Click the column heading to organize your results by relevance.
Fuzzy Search
Fuzzy searches locate both
exact matches to the search
terms you provide and partial
matches. Partial matches have
a certain number or percentage
of letters in the result that
differ from the search term. Fuzzy searches are useful to account for any
errors in OCR, uncertainty about the spelling of a word or name, words or
names that may be misspelled in the document, or inflected versions of words
(such as “swim” and “swam”).
You can perform a fuzzy search by opening the Text search type in the Search
Pane and selecting the Fuzzy search check box. Alternatively, you can enable
Fuzzy search for all full-text searches by clicking on Tools and selecting
Options. Expand the Search node and select General. Check the Use Fuzzy
check box. In this Options dialog box, you can also configure the criteria for
the fuzzy search to be based on the number of letters or the percentage of a
word that can be different from the search term. If you select Number of
letters, input the maximum number of letters that can differ from the letters in
12
your search term and still return a result. If you select Percentage of word,
input the maximum percentage of letters in the result that can differ from the
search term.
Note: Setting a high Percentage of words or Number of letters
that can differ can create a large fuzzy search range. The larger
the fuzzy search range, the longer your search.
For instance, you want to locate a document that refers to a particular person.
You do not know if the person’s name is spelled “Sandra” or “Sondra,” so
you run a fuzzy search and specify that the number of letters can differ by
one. That way, regardless of whether you input “Sandra” or “Sondra,” you
will be able to find the document. You will not, however, be able to find
documents that refer to the person by her nickname, “Sandy.” To return
“Sandy,” you need to increase the number of letters that can differ to two.
Note: Fuzzy searches can take significantly longer than regular
searches and may turn up less relevant search results. It is
usually best to try a regular search first and use the fuzzy search
only if the regular search does not return the results you need.
13
Wildcards
Wildcards, like fuzzy searches, are a way of compensating for inconsistencies
between your search terms and the terms in the document you want to locate.
Wildcards allow you to set more specific parameters for how words can differ.
For instance, you can use wildcards to specify that the second letter in a
word, or the ending of the word, may differ from the search term.
•
Asterisk (*). The asterisk wildcard represents any number of missing
characters, including zero. For instance, a search using the term
“report*” will find report, reports, reporting, reported, reporter, etc.
•
Question mark (?). The question mark wildcard represents exactly one
character. For instance, if you were unsure whether a name was spelled
“Anderson” or “Andersen,” you could search using the term
“Anders?n.” Using a question mark wildcard in this way would return
both results.
•
Brackets ([]). Like a question mark, a set of brackets represents a single
missing character. However, brackets can be used to specify a smaller
range of options. For instance, a search using “d[io]ve” would find the
words “dive” and “dove,” but not “Dave.”
•
Dash (-). The dash character is used in conjunction with brackets to
specify that only characters within a particular range should be found.
For instance, you might want to locate all documents that contain an
account number that begins with “100347” and ends with a number
rather than a letter. You can search using “100347[0-9]” to return
account number 10003475 but not 100347C.
Wildcards can be used in combination. For instance, if you wanted to return
all documents that referred to writing or written materials, you could search
using the term “wr[io]t*.” Using this combination of wildcards will locate any
of the following terms: write, written, writing, and wrote.
Records Management Searches
If you have Laserfiche Records Management Edition, you can perform a
variety of records searches. The Select Record Manager Search option at the
top of the Search Pane provides a drop-down menu of records search types.
If you do not need to perform Records Management searches, you can hide
this option. To hide the Record Manager search option, click on Tools and
select Options. Expand the Search node, and select General. Clear the Show
Records Management check box.
For more information about Records Management searches, see the help files.
14
Getting Started with Searching in the Laserfiche 8.2 Client
April 2011
Authors: Misty Powers, Constance Anderson, and Sarah Seene
Editors: Tammy Kaehler, Gordon Wong
Technical Editor: Justin Pava
Laserfiche
3545 Long Beach Blvd.
Long Beach, CA 90807
U.S.A
Phone: +1.562.988.1688
www.laserfiche.com
Laserfiche is a trademark of Compulink Management Center, Inc.
Various product and service names references herein may be
trademarks of Compulink Management Center, Inc. All other products
and service names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners.
Copyright © 2011 Compulink Management Center, Inc.
All rights reserved
15
Fly UP