...

advances 2009

by user

on
Category: Documents
2

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

advances 2009
Nursing is the frontline of health. Nurses are the face of patient care. What could be more important?
advances
university of nebraska medical center college of nursing 2009
Who will care
for you and yours?
MIA: Nebraska’s
critical nursing shortage.
Brain IVs
Teachers inject
stimulus Page12
Special section
Solving the nurse
deficit Page15
Pocket alums
Legacy notes in
white coats Page 23
Next gen RN
The fresh face
of care Page24
VOLUME FIVE
News
2009
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
4
Leadership
A bold path forward.
Building a cure for Nebraska’s nursing shortage.
Evidence elevates care.
advances
Published annually by the University of Nebraska
Medical Center College of Nursing. ©UNMC 2009.
Reprint permission upon request by nonprofit health,
educational and civic organizations, provided proper
credit is given. Call (402) 559-5414 for release.
6
Research
8
Support
One-on-one guidance.
10 Engagement
All-out war on illness.
DESIGN I PRODUCTION Markers Design
Public health pivots on proactive nursing.
PHOTOGRAPHY
In touch: Patient perception is reality.
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Student services foster academic success.
CONTENT I CREATIVE
Pamela Bataillon, RN,
MBA, MSN, Assistant
Dean for Administration
Paladin
DougMcMains.com
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Faculty and staff, UNMC
12
Education
14
15
Alumni
Special Section
23
Giving
Brain IVs: Tapping into the Why ...
ADDRESS CHANGES
Email [email protected]
LETTERS WELCOME
Email [email protected]
or write Advances at the
address listed below
OFFICES
UNMC College of Nursing,
985330 Nebraska Medical
Center, Omaha, Nebraska
68198-5330
TELEPHONE
402 559-5414
White coat legacy.
WEBSITE
www.unmc.edu/nursing
Pocket alums pay it forward.
Please recycle. This magazine is printed with soy ink
on partially recycled paper. View current and past issues
online at unmc.edu/nursing under Advances.
The power of many.
Plug in. Speak up. Give back.
Who will care for you and yours?
Students
Blazing new frontiers.
26
Forward
Constant need to know.
28
Donors
Grants
32 Publication
College of Nursing, special
thanks to Dani Wilson-Baxter;
UNMC Alumni Affairs; UNMC
Public Affairs; University
of Nebraska Foundation
360-degree teaching.
24
30
At a glance
New roles. More responsibility. Greater expectations.
College’s continuing ed aims high, reaches far.
The roll of the charitable.
Research, education and training.
Professional journals.
5th endowed chair.
She was a trailblazing, four-decade
UNMC nursing administrator. And the
College’s longtime benefactor and tireless
volunteer. Her estate added a large final
gift: The Carol M. Wilson Endowed Chair
in Nursing will focus on her passion,
improving health systems, and enable
the College to add a first-rate nursing
scholar to the faculty.
New deans named.
Nationally known cancer nursing
scientist Marlene Cohen, RN, PhD, FAAN,
has joined the College as associate dean
for research, director of Niedfelt Nursing
Research Center and first recipient of the
Kenneth E. Morehead Endowed Chair in
Nursing. See p. 6.
For the first time in the College’s history,
student services are now headed at dean
level. Rudy Garcia, MPA, PhD, brings
deep background in student affairs to the
new post of assistant dean for student
services. See p. 8.
Nursing economics.
It looks like nurses will have a lead role
in economic as well as physical recovery.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects
that nursing will create approximately
587,000 new jobs nationally by 2016 —
at average annual income of $62,480 for
a full-time RN. A Nebraska Appleseed
Center report shows that, among the
state’s top-10 growing jobs, only one —
RN — pays sufficient wages to support
a family of four.
Appointments.
Sarah Thompson, RN, PhD, associate
dean for academic programs, was appointed
to a three-year term as Florence Niedfelt
Professor. Her endowed professorship
will focus on health care quality improvement and interprofessional education.
Gov. Dave Heineman named Mary
Wendel, RN, MSA, business manager
of the College’s Morehead Center for
Nursing Practice, to the board of the
Nebraska Center for Nursing, created
to address the state’s nursing shortage.
Photo courtesy Nebraska National Guard
Contents
The Kearney division’s Heather Swanson,
RN, APRN, was appointed to the board of
the American College of Nurse-Midwives.
Alumnus Susan Hassmiller, R.N, PhD,
was named senior advisor to the Robert
Wood Johnson Foundation for Nursing.
Awards and honors.
Drs. Nancy Waltman, Carol Ott, Jan
Twiss, Gloria Gross and dean emeritus
Ada Lindsey won Cancer Nursing magazine’s 2008 Research Award for their
article on bone impact of postmenopausal
breast cancer treatment.
Marlene Lindeman, RN, MSN, and
Connie Miller, RN, PhD, won 2009
UNMC Outstanding Teacher Awards.
The Lincoln division’s Christie Campbell
-Grossman, RN, PhD, received the 2008
Outstanding Nurse Educator Award
from the Nebraska Nurses Association.
Kathy Morris, APRN, DNP, director of
the College’s Family Health Care Clinic,
Heroic. Lincoln division student and
Nebraska National Guard member Sgt.
Heather Springer won the Army Gold
Star for Valor for courageous service
under fire as a flight medic in Iraq.
was selected as a Fellow of the American
Academy of Nurse Practitioners.
Ann Berger, RN, PhD, delivered the Stateof-the-Science Lecture at the Oncology
Nursing Society’s annual conference.
Dr. Berger is a widely known authority
on chemotherapy fatigue and sleep
disturbances in breast cancer patients.
Dean Virginia Tilden, RN, DNSc, FAAN,
received the 2009 Lifetime Achievement
Award from the 13-state Midwest Nursing
Research Society.
Omaha. A 42,800 sq.ft. Center for College
Norfolk. A 5th division is planned for 2010 as part of a 35,000 sq. ft. collaborative
of Nursing Sciences will open in 2010
on the east end of the present building.
nursing education center, a partnership of the Norfolk community, Northeast Community
College, Faith Regional Health Services and UNMC.
Front page news. The College’s efforts to end Nebraska’s nursing shortage were
detailed on October 22, 2008, groundbreaking day for its new nursing sciences and
education center in Omaha (see right). At each of the College’s divisions across
Nebraska, public service activities by faculty and students are commonly in local news.
Reprinted with permission from The Omaha World-Herald.
2
2009 advances
www.unmc.edu/nursing
3
DEAN AND PROFESSOR
Leadership
Virginia Tilden
RN, DNSc, FAAN
402-559-4109 [email protected]
“Demand is exploding. The ELEPHANT in the waiting room of health care is the Baby Boom generation.”
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Among her efforts to solve
Nebraska’s critical nursing shortfall,
Dean Tilden spurred new and
planned construction unprecedented
in the College’s nine-decade history.
THE
A D VA N C E S I N T E R V I E W
WITH DEAN
VIRGINIA TILDEN
Building a cure
for Nebraska’s
nursing shortage.
A bold path forward.
With Nebraska’s severe nursing shortage projected to worsen, Dean Tilden asks
communities a simple question: Who will care for you and yours? Her response:
Unparalleled building to raise enrollment. Accelerated programs for students
and faculty. Higher academic standards for better care quality. Not just more
nurses, but better educated nurses. Her message to Nebraska: Help us help you.
4
2009 advances
Q. Health care sits with the recession
at the center of national anxiety.
Where does nursing stand today?
A. Over 3 million Americans are registered
nurses. We’re the biggest of the health
professions, and we have to be. Nurses
have the most contact with patients —
in every care setting.
At issue is a U.S. nursing shortage projected
to grow to 20% over the next decade.
The problem is most severe in largely
rural states like ours. It affects every part
of the state. The outlook: Nebraska will
be short nearly 4,000 nurses in 2020.
Q. Is the nursing shortage because
students aren’t interested in nursing?
A. Just the opposite. Interest far exceeds
capacity to educate. Across the U.S.,
qualified applicants are turned away
because of insufficient faculty, facilities
and resources. UNMC has had to turn
away half of qualified nursing applicants
— over 1,000 students in the past five
years alone.
Q. If the supply of nurses is down,
does that mean demand is slowing?
A. Demand is exploding. The elephant in
the waiting room of health care is the
Baby Boom generation. As huge waves
of Boomers enter retirement, it puts
tremendous strain on the entire health
system. We need more nurses in all
aspects of geriatric care.
Other factors raise demand for BSN and
MSN nurses. Among them are rapid medical advances, more specialized care and
increasingly complex medical technologies.
Q. How is the College addressing
the nursing shortage?
A. We’re raising enrollment capacity statewide through new and improved facilities.
We recently finished a $600,000 upgrade
in Scottsbluff. We’re looking at expansion in Kearney. In Omaha, construction
is underway on a new nursing sciences
center. Planned in Lincoln is a $17.5
million home to replace cramped rental
space. In Norfolk, we’re working on a
new UNMC nursing division as part of
a nursing education collaborative.
Q. The College is also reshaping the
curriculum. In what ways?
A. We’ll expand our accelerated BSN program to get more nurses into service faster.
We’ll add an accelerated MSN program.
The nursing pipeline is choked by a
faculty shortage as well as inadequate
space. So we’ll increase enrollment in
our fast-track BSN to PhD program,
created for those who want to be
educators. Throughout the graduate
program, we’re adding elements to
incent and prepare teachers, especially
for high-demand specialties.
We’re adopting Institute of Medicine
recommendations, particularly at the
BSN level. It’s all aimed at elevating care
quality. The focus is on critical thinking,
collaborative training and patient safety.
One goal is to manage illness and disease
in context of the patient’s background,
environment, circumstances — everything that bears upon health. We want
students framed in holistic care, not
just isolated health events.
Q. You’ve sought out statewide speaking
engagements. What’s your message?
A. I talk about how the nursing shortage
affects people at the local level. In every
community, I pose a question that seems
to drive it home: “Who will care for you
and yours?” I tell them what UNMC is
doing to solve the problem — and how
they can help us to help them have
enough nurses in their future.
Q. You also initiated an ongoing series
of meetings with local business
leaders, educators and health care
providers. What’s the goal?
A. The nursing shortage carries a dual
penalty. It affects both physical and economic health, especially in small towns
and rural areas. Nebraska communities
need health care to draw and hold residents — and the businesses that employ
them. The goal is to form benefit-laden
partnerships to help communities attract,
educate, retain and upgrade nurses.
Q. Is Norfolk a model for local
partnerships across Nebraska?
A. Absolutely. Norfolk civic and business
leaders are near completion of a $12.9
million campaign to fund a collaborative nursing education center. It will
operate as a partnership of Northeast
Community College, Faith Regional
Health Services and UNMC.
That model can be replicated statewide
on a smaller scale. At minimum, local
partners can create “Nursing Nebraska”
scholarships, work-study programs and
other incentives for qualified students
in exchange for post-graduate service
commitments in their communities.
Everyone wins. Students may not otherwise be able to fund their education,
and communities may not otherwise
be able to attract nurses.
Q. What’s on your agenda
in the year ahead?
A. We’re working on centers of excellence to
move nursing to the next level. They will
require donor help, and it’s my job to make
the case. Nursing stands at a transformative crossroads. Donors big and small
find it exciting — and forever rewarding
— to be part of large efforts that yield
large dividends in better patient care.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
5
ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH
Research
Marlene Cohen
RN, PhD, FAAN
“I was STRUCK by how nurses, other professionals, and even family
402-559-5358 [email protected]
members UNDERSTOOD LITTLE about patients’ experiences.”
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Dr. Cohen joined the
College last fall as Associate Dean
for Research and first
holder of the Kenneth E. Morehead
Endowed Chair in Nursing.
THE
A D VA N C E S I N T E R V I E W
WITH
MARLENE COHEN
In touch:
Patient
perception
is reality.
Evidence elevates care.
Nationally known for improving cancer care, Dr. Marlene Cohen has
a prodigious body of publication and a long record of research funding by
the National Institutes of Health. Her studies focus on human reaction
to cancer diagnosis, symptoms and treatment.
6
2009 advances
Q. What informs your work?
A. Florence Nightingale was the first among
many to discuss the need to understand
patients’ perceived needs in order to
meet those needs effectively. My work
has been designed to better understand patients’ experiences because the
meanings that patients attribute to their
experiences help create the needs they
have and determine how these needs
can best be met.
Q. In what areas have you focused —
and why?
A. My program of research focuses on
understanding how the world is perceived
by patients, their family members and
professional staff. I’ve examined these
perspectives in order to improve the care
that professionals provide.
Among her many lasting contributions
to nursing, Florence Nightingale pointed
out how important it is to understand
patients’ perspectives. It is far more likely
that nurses and other professionals will
meet needs that they understand than
those of which they are unaware.
My earliest work compared nurses’ and
patients’ perspectives — first with persons
who had surgery, then with persons in
critical care settings. I was struck by how
nurses, other professionals, and even
family members understood little about
patients’ experiences. After the studies
of people with acute illnesses I studied
persons with a chronic illness, diabetes,
and again found disparity in staff
members’ understanding.
I then started a job in a cancer center,
learned more about persons with cancer
and became fascinated with the variety
of needs this disease and its treatments
evoke. I’m interested in just about every-
thing. I’ve studied nurses’ experiences
working with persons with cancer. I’ve
also studied persons who do not have
cancer, to examine ways to promote
health and prevent disease — cancer
screening, for example.
In addition, my research has examined
care of persons undergoing active
treatment, including breast cancer and
stem cell transplantation patients. I’ve
worked with cancer survivors, and my
recent studies have been with people
at end of life, including a group enrolled
in a Phase I clinical trial. Each study has
led to another. I found both differences
and similarities among the experiences
of patients who had different cancers
and treatments.
My goal is to describe these experiences
so that staff can better understand them
and to develop more effective interventions to help patients and their loved ones.
Q. What studies are
you engaged in now?
A. I’m continuing work on three previously
funded projects. Two of the studies examine symptoms at end of life.
One involves the effect of hydration and
the meaning of hydration to the families
and patients. The other examines fatigue,
combining a drug, methylphenidate,
with a therapeutic telephone call from a
nurse. It’s fun to work with the nurses
doing these interviews and the therapeutic
phone calls, and to hear the fascinating
stories of the patients and families.
The third study is work with a physician
colleague who is a new investigator,
helping her examine symptoms that
children with cancer experience.
been an important theme in much of
my research. The distance technology
for which the College is so well known
has helped me stay in touch with my
research teams in Houston.
I’m also developing a grant proposal
with Associate Dean Sarah Thompson
and Dean Virginia Tilden to look at
symptoms in persons with cancer who
are in nursing homes, a setting in which
Drs. Thompson and Tilden have expertise.
I look forward to developing other
studies with colleagues here in Nebraska.
Q. In what nursing specialties is the
College’s work influential?
A. As a new Nebraskan, I’m still learning
about the College, but my decision to
come was really influenced by the fine
work of faculty members.
They are excellent teachers who care
very much about students and student
learning and success. This passion for
education is demonstrated by the six
training grants that were submitted
just last December, all of which propose
various ways to improve the education
we provide. They are also outstanding
research scientists. The College has great
strength in both oncology and cardiovascular research.
In both of these fields, the College has
gained major funding for important
and innovative investigations. Examples
include health promotion studies involving exercise and weight loss, and symptom
studies examining sleep disturbances,
fatigue and neuropathy. In addition,
several proposals are now being reviewed
which will bring exciting new opportunities to the College. I look forward
to sharing those with you next year.
All of these studies examine cultural
similarities and differences, which has
www.unmc.edu/nursing
7
ASSISTANT DEAN FOR STUDENT SERVICES
Support
Rudy Garcia
PhD, MPA
“It’s our job to CULTIVATE success — as students, as nurses, as leaders.”
402-559-4120 [email protected]
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Dr. Garcia joined the College
in January in the newly created
post of Assistant Dean for
Student Services. He brings deep
background in student affairs.
THE
A D VA N C E S I N T E R V I E W
WITH
RUDY GARCIA
Student
services foster
academic
success.
One-on-one guidance.
When BSN students reach UNMC, they’ve already completed pre-requisites but
now face stiffer academic hurdles. MSN and PhD students need support matching
their advanced level. Nearly all must balance study and work. Student services
come in many forms but have one goal: thriving students who win their degrees.
8
2009 advances
Q. What attracted you to the UNMC
College of Nursing?
A. I’ve worked at several other universities
and UNMC stands out as one of the most
caring and supportive places for students.
With over 1,000 students, the College of
Nursing is the biggest of UNMC’s health
colleges. It composes one third of UNMC
students and continues to grow.
Q. What was your first challenge?
A. Being new to the position, to UNMC,
and to the state of Nebraska, I had a huge
learning curve.
Getting a current, accurate and complete
picture will help me make informed
decisions. But the basic student services
challenge is the same in Nebraska as in
Colorado, Arizona or elsewhere — to
help students be successful in and out of
the classroom.
The faculty and staff have been overwhelmingly supportive in my transition.
I truly appreciate their commitment and
determination to develop a strong student
support environment and minimize
frustrations for students as they navigate
their way through the various processes
of academia.
Q. For the first time, student services
are led by an assistant dean. How do
you see your role?
A. I bring a different perspective to the
College of Nursing, given that my
background is in student affairs and
student services.
I’m also an assistant professor in the
department of Families and Health
Systems. I anticipate being more
involved in the academic side of the
College, helping to develop and teach
courses on health care leadership and
management as well as courses on
ethics, culture and diversity in nursing.
Nurses and nursing faculty need preparation in these areas to meet the challenges
of a rapidly changing, highly competitive
field in a global economy.
Q. What is the scope of student services?
A. Student services can involve everything
from recruitment and advising to locker
assignment and coordinating the white
coat induction ceremony. At the graduate level, students are more independent
and need more specific support, especially
from faculty.
The core mission of student services is
to help move students from admission to
graduation, supporting them every step
of the way.
Q. How are student services changing?
A. The digital generation demands a different level of support. Student services
now involve not just admission and
graduation but everything in between. It
requires an attentive professional staff.
Our role encompasses the total student:
academic success, involvement, leadership, satisfaction, progression, mentoring,
career exploration and much more.
We work hard to ensure that each student’s focus goes beyond applying and
being accepted to becoming a successful
nursing student.
Q. What common issues face students?
A. Transitions can be difficult. Undergraduate students who go straight to college
may assimilate differently than students
who work first. Most RNs advancing to
a BSN degree continue to work full time
and thus do part-time study.
Graduate students may have to adjust
to college again after working, raising
a family or a long time away from school.
All these students need careful attention. It’s our job to cultivate success —
as students, as nurses, as leaders.
Q. What’s on your student
services agenda?
A. We’ll be proactive in meeting student
needs — in recruiting, retaining and
graduating students. We will reach out
to Nebraska students, border to border,
all backgrounds, rural and urban.
We want our students to look like
Nebraska, America and the world. An
inclusive nursing college reflects UNMC’s
position as a world-class health sciences
center. Nebraska’s Initiative 424 makes
inclusion more challenging in recruiting
students and faculty, but our message
re-mains clear that all are welcome.
We’ll strive to enlist potential faculty
members through our graduate programs.
The nursing shortage mirrors a faculty
shortage, so educating new teachers is
imperative. Students spend more time
with instructors than student services
staff, so faculty are an important link in
our retention and mentoring efforts.
A 500-mile wide nursing campus poses
some logistical issues. We’re upgrading
our all-campus student information
system. We’ll work to improve communication between campuses so that
students feel more connected to UNMC
as well as their city campus.
Space is tight. We’re planning more
student services room in our new
Omaha building as well as in planned
facilities in Norfolk and Lincoln.
Q. What’s ahead?
A. We need to reach out to students sooner
than we do. If we plant seeds early in middle and high school, students can adjust
coursework accordingly. Ideally, students
should be thinking about math and
science well before they enter high school.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
9
CHAIR DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH
Engagement
Mary Cramer
RN, PhD, CS
“What DRIVES nursing? Prevent avoidable illness, manage unavoidable disease,
402-559-6617 [email protected]
expand access to basic, affordable care. That’s also the ROOT of public health policy.”
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Chair of the Department of
Community-Based Health in the
College of Nursing, Dr. Cramer
also teaches in UNMC’s College
of Public Health.
THE
A D VA N C E S I N T E R V I E W
WITH
M A RY C R A M E R
Public health
pivots
on proactive
nursing.
All-out war on illness.
Generous donations from longtime UNMC benefactors Ruth and Bill Scott
provided primary funding for both the new Center for College of Nursing Sciences
and College of Public Health building now under construction. A community
health expert discusses the dividends that will flow from these gifts.
10
2009 advances
Q. How does Nebraska benefit
from the Scott gifts?
A. The Scotts had the remarkable vision to
recognize and address Nebraska’s pressing
needs in two inseparable areas: nursing
and public health.
The new nursing facility will help solve
the state’s critical nursing shortage. It
allows us to increase enrollment. To
expand accelerated programs to prepare
nurses and faculty. To improve educational
services and support for our campuses
and clinics across the state. All of which
means more nurses for Nebraska.
The BSN degree is entry level for public
health nursing. The nursing shortfall
means Nebraska’s regional public health
departments can’t hire enough BSN and
especially advanced practice MSN public
health nurses. Our state badly needs both
not only to provide nursing care but also
to help shape public health policy.
The Scott gifts really brighten the picture.
Especially for rural health departments,
where nurse deficits are greatest. And
generally for wider public access to basic
health care — through school nurses,
for example, and at community clinics
and shelters.
Nebraska’s economy is helped, too.
UNMC will be able to attract more nursing and public health research funding,
which means jobs across the state.
Q. What do the Scott gifts
mean for UNMC?
A. They enable UNMC to extend its state,
regional and national leadership in public
health education, policy and practice.
They also strengthen UNMC’s position
in the top tier of health science universities.
The College of Nursing (CON) and
the College of Public Health (COPH)
will have state-of-the-art facilities,
which are key in attracting top students
and faculty members.
COPH did not have its own building.
It had to borrow classroom and clinical
space scattered across UNMC. A new
home will centralize faculty and resources.
It will also facilitate collaboration in
research and education with all UNMC
health colleges and with public health
agencies. CON and COPH, for example,
are working on a joint MSN/MPH
degree program.
Q. What are the aims of COPH?
A. To prepare a professionally trained
workforce for state and local health
departments. Nebraska has a fairly new
system of regional departments. The
state and UNMC are positioned for
national leadership in health care
delivery for a rural population. Innovation and collaboration are priorities.
COPH will offer advanced education
in environmental/occupational health,
epidemiology and biostatistics. Joining
the current master’s degree will be
doctoral programs in toxicology, health
promotion, health services research
and administration.
Q. What do you teach at COPH?
A. The course is Health Systems and Policy.
It’s offered through CON.
Q. What are today’s issues in
public health?
A. Let’s start with health care reform —
accessibility, quality, cost, insurance.
Those things affect everyone. The penalty
is most severe on rural, poor and
minority populations — which is its
own public health issue: care disparities.
About 47 million Americans have no
health insurance. In today’s economy,
that number grows quickly with job losses.
The U.S. ranks 46th in life expectancy,
42nd in infant mortality. We have a higher
obesity rate than all other industrialized
countries. Diabetes is at epidemic proportions, especially in Nebraska and
especially among our Hispanic, black
and rural residents.
AIDS, H1N1 flu, bioterrorism, geriatric
care and sexually transmitted diseases
present huge challenges. So do virulent,
fast-spreading agents, whether introduced by terrorists or a new pandemic
— like the 1918 influenza strain that
killed over 40 million people worldwide.
That seems unimaginable today, but it
could happen again.
The nursing shortage is a serious public
health issue. Nebraska must not only
prepare more nurses but also better
educated nurses — with BSN degrees
and above — for our increasingly
complex health horizon.
We need to shift focus to proactive,
360-degree patient care that emphasizes
wellness, that helps people control
chronic interrelated health problems.
The U.S. needs to move beyond our
reactive system that defaults to emergency
and intensive care for isolated health
events. If we do, we’ll see better patient
outcomes and lower costs.
Q. You earlier said nursing and public
health are inseparable. How so?
A. Of the health professions, nursing is
easily the largest, with the most patient
contact. In many communities, nurse
practitioners, clinical nurse specialists
and nurse-managed health centers are
the first — sometimes only — source
of care, especially in rural areas.
From its beginnings, nursing centered
on health promotion, disease prevention
and managing chronic illness. In 19th
century America, nurses were advocates
for serving the poor and vulnerable,
including immigrants and minorities.
That hasn’t changed.
What drives nursing? Prevent avoidable
illness, manage unavoidable disease, expand access to basic, affordable care. That’s
also the root of public health policy.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
11
ACTIVE LEARNING STIMULUS
Education
Creating hunger to know
“The most important practical lesson that can be given to nurses is to teach them what to OBSERVE.”
— Florence Nightingale
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
1 In her modest, understated manner,
Virtual reality learning:
Instructors can program highfidelity simulated patients
with a wide range of interactive
speech and life-like symptoms.
Brain IVs:
Tapping
veins into
Why.
What.
When.
Where.
How.
360-degree teaching.
Katherine Bravo, RN, MSN, PNP, per-
colates enthusiasm for her work. She is a
pediatric nurse practitioner, with clinical
specialty in children’s urology and medical
/surgical nursing. Her calling came early in
her training. “I knew it on my first pediatric
rotation,” she said. “You see the joy in their
faces. It’s incredibly rewarding.” She also
coordinates the Omaha division’s pediatrics
training, Accelerated BSN program and RN
to BSN classes. “I love to see the evolution,”
she said, comparing new students to new
parents. At first, they’re “eager but nervous,”
afraid of making mistakes. With knowledge
and experience, she said, “Their confidence
grows. They ‘get it.’ Then the key is to teach
them to practice with integrity.”
2 Outstanding nurses have special ability
to relate to people and gain trust. Pamela
Jones, RN, MPH, PhD, is one of them.
Her talent is apparent as she speaks with
articulate zeal about community health
nursing — where there’s routine need to
work not just with patients and students
but a wide range of health professionals,
government agencies and local stakeholders. With early background in oncology
and home health nursing, she “found my
niche” in public health. Of special interest
are health disparities and the role of
community groups, churches and service
organizations in influencing behavior. Her
current research examines their impact in
tobacco prevention and cessation among
African-Americans. Like most things in
life, she said, health hinges on relationships.
It is in their DNA. They are all-in. Fully immersed. Deeply engaged. Eager to
3 Her father was a physician. Her
mother was a teacher. Her older sister was
a nurse. For a small-town Minnesota girl
fascinated by science, the career path was
a natural. After earning her BSN degree,
Mary Megel, RN, PhD, began work under
intense conditions — as a U.S. Navy nurse
in the Vietnam War. Her three advanced
degrees merged her driving passions:
nursing and education. She’s taught an
extraordinary breadth of courses to
undergraduate and graduate students, all
of which she dismisses as “absolutely fun.”
She quotes with ease passages from
Florence Nightingale’s seminal Notes on
Nursing. “I’m a teacher,” she said simply.
“I’m here for students. I make it a point
to be in my office if they have questions,
problems or want to talk about nursing.”
4 Growing up in Seoul, South Korea,
Yaewon Seo, RN, PhD, found joy in
helping people. Her parents were her
model, as was a nurse relative. Yonsei
University School of Nursing, where she
earned BSN and MSN degrees, set her
sights high. A new dean inspired her on the
need to keep growing and to balance
teaching, research and practice. After her
PhD at Case Western University, she was
drawn to UNMC by its cardiac research.
Her research examines heart failure
symptom management, restorative exercise
and daily living activity disabilities. Her
clinical background is medical/surgical
nursing, and she enjoys clinical teaching.
Like her former dean, she said, educators
should lift student aspirations. Her
husband, a computer systems analyst, is
a PhD student in information science.
5 “I can’t remember not wanting to be a
nurse.” With those simple words, Margaret
Wilson, RN, PhD, CPNP, expressed the fire
that drives her teaching and research. Her
specialty is pediatric nursing, especially
children’s response to pain and hospital
stress. Quiet children, she noted, may be in
pain. Her work factors temperament, personality and environment. It tests interventions
and medication, with focus on preventive,
proactive care. In adult transplant patients,
she explores how nurse interaction with
caregivers aids recovery. She’s advised many
PhD students, “helping them improve their
communication and get their work published.” On teaching: “I love it when students
‘get it,’ especially after they’ve struggled,”
she said. “It’s about how they can make a
difference, especially in children’s lives.”
6
His words radiate quiet passion, empathy
and great urgency. During early training,
on psychiatric nursing rotation, he met an
unforgettable 21-year-old. The man, unable
to speak coherently, played flawless classical
music. From that moment, Michael Rice,
APRN-BC, PhD, FAAN, lived to nurse
the mind. He tells how physical and mental
illness converge. How an abused woman
has eight times the risk for postpartum
depression. How maternal health risks
can predispose child psychosis. How his
psychiatric nursing column advocates
evidence-based practice. How the solution
forms in a collaborative, multidisciplinary
team treating the 360-degree patient.
How he returned to his native Nebraska
to help improve its mental health services.
How, long ago, his parents shaped his path.
illuminate. Born to share knowledge. Their tools: probing questions, tall hurdles,
1
2
3
4
5
6
gentle nudges. They watch closely. For an upturned face, a knowing smile,
eyes that light with understanding. Here you meet a few educators who inspire.
12
2009 advances
www.unmc.edu/nursing
13
PRESIDENT NURSING ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Alumni
Rebecca Keating-Lefler
RN, PhD 402-559-4185 [email protected]
Nursing is the frontline of health. Nurses are the face of patient care. What could be more important?
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Plug in.
Speak up.
Give back.
The
power
of
many.
Who will care
for you and yours?
Teacher. Mentor. Donor. Leader. Dr. Rebecca Keating-Lefler, here surrounded by her students, guides the way for both students and alumni.
Nebraska’s critical nursing shortage.
Triple alum heads association.
Her colleagues say she leads by example.
Her students say she stimulates and inspires.
Her friends say she always steps up. Meet
Rebecca Keating-Lefler, RN, PhD. This
extraordinary woman was driven to lead,
now including the alumni association.
At age 14, Beckie Keating lost her mother
to a tragic fall. That experience, coupled
with her father’s habitual willingness to
help people, led her to nursing. Her parents
set the mold: one person can change the
lives of others.
She earned all three of her nursing degrees
from UNMC. She’s a teacher, mentor and
role model in the College’s department of
Families and Health Systems. Her specialty
is women’s health and high-risk obstetrics.
Her research focus is single, low-income
mothers. Her educational passion is health
policy, leadership and health outcomes
management.
She long ago walked the talk: she and her
husband created a nursing scholarship fund
for disadvantaged students. Her “pay it
forward” outlook now guides the alumni
association. It can leverage the power of
many, she said, to make good things happen
— banding nurses together, for example, to
fund a class gift or to influence health policy.
“Health care in our country is at a critical
point,” she said. “As the biggest of the health
professions, nurses are in a pivotal position
to lead the way. But we must speak up.”
She noted that the College of Nursing is
the largest of UNMC’s schools, with the
most alums. “It’s important,” she said, “to
connect, to give back, to foster the next
generation.” A place to start, she suggested,
is sponsoring a new student at the White
Coat Ceremony (see p. 23).
Join or renew your membership now.
Go to www.unmc.edu/alumni. Click on Join
at top left. It’s fast and easy.
2008 distinguished alumnus award.
Maj. Gen. Kimberly Siniscalchi, RN (MSN
— UNMC ’88) is chief of the Air Force
Nurse Corps and assistant surgeon general
for medical force development, directing
over 19,000 nurses and 34,000 medical
personnel. Assignments included chief of
medical combat support operations and
chief White House nurse.
Alumni Weekend is Oct. 2-3.
Visit www.unmc.edu/alumni for details.
Watch your mail for registration forms.
university of nebraska medical center
14
2009 advances
•
college of nursing
When you or yours need
urgent medical care, whose
face will you see most often?
If you or a loved one is hospitalized by sickness, disease or injury, who
is always there? Who is the one constant? Who is the face of 24/7 care?
T H E C R U C I A L R O L E S O F N U R S I N G I N M O D E R N H E A LT H C A R E
1 Act as patient advocates.
As the largest of the health professions — with the most patient contact — nurses are a powerful
voice for their patients as well as for broader health care reform.
2 Form the hub of health care.
Nurses are the hub of health care — whether treatment comes in
an emergency room, doctor’s office, community clinic, homeless shelter
or, especially, school clinic and nursing home.
Beyond managing the patient’s prescribed care, nurses are the hub connecting the whole medical team.
They must communicate expertly with doctors, pharmacists, therapists and other health professionals.
Precisely because they’re always there, nurses are sometimes taken
for granted. Sometimes undervalued.
Modern nurses must call on broad nursing knowledge backed by agility in health informatics, medical
technologies and hands-on procedures.
Next time you need medical help, please consider the many levels of
care that face brings you.
3 Blend vast knowledge with nimble skills.
4 Make critical care decisions.
Today’s nurse is routinely expected to make key care decisions based on evidence and keen observation.
5 Shift focus to wellness & prevention.
Nursing is predicated on health promotion, disease prevention and illness management — an
affordable, proactive model often lost in an expensive, reactive system that defaults to emergency
treatment and intensive care.
6 Widen access to basic health care.
Nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and nurse-managed health centers are increasingly the
first line of care, especially in rural areas.
7 Stand as sentinels of patient safety.
Nurses must be forever vigilant, must anticipate patient risks, must act quickly in preemptive
treatment, must intervene early to prevent medical errors.
Nurses are much more likely than any other
health professional to recognize and correct errors
that are often life-threatening. — Institute of Medicine
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
www.unmc.edu/nursing
THE URGENT QUESTION BEHIND TWO PRESSING PROBLEMS
Will enough nurses
be there when
you need them?
Like a tightening vise, two converging
forces put exponential pressure on
tomorrow’s nursing care. At risk is the
likelihood that there will be sufficient
nurses, across all specialties, to
care properly for you and your family.
PROBLEM ONE
Snowballing shortages.
Tsunami demand.
The problem is mirrored — and the nursing
pipeline choked — by a nationwide shortage of
faculty. Not only is there insufficient faculty,
many teachers are nearing the end of their careers.
Reflecting national numbers, the average age of
nursing faculty at UNMC is 54.
Huge waves of retiring Baby Boomers will
dramatically increase demand for nurses
everywhere — at physician offices, community
clinics, outpatient centers, hospitals and
SOLUTION ONE
Raise enrollment capacity with
unprecedented construction.
This would have been unthinkable without enormous
help from generous donors. Never before in the
College’s nine-decade history has there been so much
building afoot over such short time.
Completed: A major renovation in Scottsbluff.
Underway: A 42,800 sq. ft. connecting structure
in Omaha. Planned: a 5th division in Norfolk as
part of a new 35,000 sq. ft. collaborative nursing
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
PROBLEM TWO
Like the entire U.S., Nebraska faces a critical —
and growing — shortage of nurses. The state’s
current shortfall is projected to jump to 20% —
nearly 4,000 nurses — by 2020.
OUR SOLUTIONS: A BOLD CHAR TER OF PA R TICULARS
What we’re doing
to end the nursing
shortage and elevate
the quality of care.
Half of Nebraska’s nurses with bachelor’s degrees are
UNMC graduates. But today at UNMC and across the
U.S., half of all qualified applicants are turned away
because of insufficient faculty, facilities and resources.
nursing homes. A gathering tsunami looms for
geriatric care.
Completing the perfect storm: Rapid medical advances,
rigorous new care standards and increasingly complex
medical technologies demand more — and better
educated — nurses across all specialties.
As it ages, the largest generation in U.S. history
puts unprecedented strain on health care.
education center. In Lincoln: a 45,525 sq. ft. permanent new home, replacing temporary leased space.
Contemplated: larger student capacity in Kearney.
This is not about bricks and mortar. It’s the how we’ll
get more nurses and more faculty working to serve
Nebraska communities.
SOLUTION TWO
Add speed: Accelerated preparation
of both nurses and nursing faculty.
To get more nurses into service faster, we’re expanding
our one-year Accelerated BSN program. We’ll streamline our RN to BSN program to advance current nurses.
And we’ll increase our fast-track BSN to PhD program,
created for those who want to be educators.
SOLUTION THREE
Embed IOM benchmarks across
curriculum to elevate care quality.
With all the health sciences at UNMC, the College of
Nursing is fast adopting Institute of Medicine
recommendations throughout our bachelor’s, master’s
and doctoral curriculum.
IOM guidelines include interprofessional team
training, critical thinking, evidence-based practice,
wide application of informatics, cultural sensitivity,
continual quality improvement — and foremost —
patient safety and patient-centered care.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
imagine
ENDLESS DIVIDENDS IN BETTER CARE
How you can help.
Our driving imperative is unchanged since 1917:
UNMC will lead the front rank of nursing science and
“Quality patient
care hinges
service — through bold vision, with bold action.
Our endeavors fall squarely under UNMC’s three-fold
EDUCATION
Center for Nursing
Education Excellence
The Nursing Education Center will be a leader
in sophisticated learning technologies. Robotic
patients, computerized simulations, miniature ICUs
and trauma centers will replace 50% of the need for
nursing student training sites in clinical agencies. In
addition, the Center will develop educator pathways
in the MSN and PhD programs that inspire and
encourage students to become nursing faculty.
Accelerated Pathways
to a Nursing Career
nursing
The things that excite us most are presented here. They
workforce.”
will yield endless dividends in better care. They also
To address the nursing shortage and build on our
successful Accelerated BSN and Accelerated PhD
programs, we will open an Accelerated Master’sEntry program for academically gifted students
with baccalaureate degrees in other fields to enter
nursing at the master’s degree level.
require donor help to see fruition. We warmly welcome
Geriatric Education Excellence
your participation.
To answer the swelling demand for elder care, we
will increase geriatric nursing faculty and students
and develop more master’s and PhD geriatric
specialists to serve the state. To counteract workforce burnout in nursing homes, we will offer
a Geriatric Leadership program to prepare nurse
administrators for long-term care facilities.
on having a
mission: education, research and patient care.
well-educated
C. Fay Raines
PhD, RN
President, American Association
of Colleges of Nursing
Center for Palliative and
End-of-Life Care
Research and Training
This is a giant unmet need — and a subject often
avoided. We must address it squarely: by 2020,
nearly 40% of deaths will occur in nursing homes.
Dual purpose of this Center: 1) Interprofessional
training for nursing, medical, and pharmacy students
in team-based care of the dying. 2) Research focused
on alleviating pain and anxiety, on easing life in
its final stages.
Health Promotion and
Disease Prevention Research
We’ll work closely with the College of Public
Health on shared goals. The research focus will be
to discover how public health nurses and school
health nurses can slash disease risks in Nebraska,
especially in small towns and rural areas.
PATIENT CARE
Center for Nursing Cancer Care
Working collaboratively with the UNMC Eppley
Cancer Center, nursing faculty and students will
develop state-of-the-art cancer survivorship
programs. This Center will also conduct research
that seeks advancements in cancer care.
Center for Health Care
Quality Improvement
RESEARCH
Center for Advancing
Symptom Management
Nursing care often centers on lessening discomfort
— on managing symptoms of disease or its
treatment. This Center will be a hub for faculty
research and student education focused on
alleviating difficult symptoms such as pain, nausea,
fatigue and insomnia.
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
The patient-centered goal is simple: develop new
nursing standards and practices that prevent errors,
reduce mistakes, prompt intervention, increase
safety, improve care and create better outcomes.
This Center will expand and concentrate nursing
faculty engaged in quality improvement for patient
care delivery systems.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
UNMC DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA FOUNDATION
Giving
CREATE A LASTING LEGACY
Kathy Wolfe
402-502-4118 [email protected]
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Why your gift is needed.
The White Coat Ceremony launches
Many think the UNMC College of Nursing is fully funded
new nursing students with a symbol
by tuition and state revenue. Those sources, however, leave
and pledge of professionalism.
In the pocket is a personal legacy.
a sizable shortfall, which must come from grants and gifts.
Your gift enables us to prepare tomorrow’s nurse leaders
Pocket alums
pay it forward.
and scientists. It helps ensure a nurse will be there when
you or a loved one needs care. All gifts, no matter the size,
White
coat
legacy.
are most welcome and appreciated.
• Gifts may be designated for any purpose or unrestricted.
• Naming opportunities are available — for example:
an endowed scholarship, professorship or learning center
in your family or foundation name.
• Memorials and honorary gifts are a superb way to
New garb. Old tradition. Fresh twist.
In generations past, students were formally
ushered into nursing by a capping ceremony.
Caps are long gone, but the tradition lives
on as the Nightingale White Coat Ceremony.
• Estate gifts can be structured to provide lifetime income
and tax benefits.
At the event, sponsored by the alumni
association, new students recite and sign
the Nightingale pledge, which emphasizes
scientific, patient-centered care. Elements
include dedication, ethics, integrity, advocacy, respect, collaboration and leadership.
A 500-MILE NURSING CAMPUS WITH GLOBAL IMPACT
For more information on giving:
Kathy Wolfe
Director of Development
University of Nebraska Foundation
402 502-4118
[email protected]
2010 Norfolk
Coats are donned with ceremonial help
from senior students, deans and faculty.
Each coat bears the College pin, symbolizing heroic, ever-faithful care.
Scottsbluff
Omaha
I-80
Kearney
Lincoln
The effect on students and their families
is apparent, said Tiffany Brunt, a student
services advisor who coordinates the
ceremonies. “You see pride on their faces.
They sense they’ve entered a true profession.
They even stand straighter.”
Waiting in the coat pocket is a personal
legacy, a passing of the torch. A card
presents the name of their white coat
sponsor. Included is the alum’s address
and year of graduation.
Among these “pocket alums” is Pam
Bataillon, assistant dean for administration.
“For students, it brings the heritage alive,”
she said. “It creates a human link. For
alums, it’s touching to get a note in return
— and rewarding to follow their progress.”
That legacy is a bargain, said student
services director Larry Hewitt. “You can
sponsor a white coat for $45,” he said.
“Many alums gift five or ten.” To sponsor
a coat, go to nufoundation.org/nursing.
Kathy Wolfe
402 559-5414
|
UNMC.EDU/NURSING
|
OMAHA
|
LINCOLN
|
KEARNEY
|
Communicating the vision.
Since our last issue, the College has a new
development director. Kathy Wolfe brings
vast communications expertise to her post
at the NU Foundation. “It’s my privilege,”
she said, “to express the College’s vision.
I hope my enthusiasm is contagious.” Find
out. Help realize the vision. Kathy’s contact
information is above.
Photo courtesy Kameron Bayne Images
recognize a relative or friend.
SCOTTSBLUFF
www.unmc.edu/nursing
23
TOMORROW”S NURSE LEADERS
Students
Embracing the future
“Learning is not attained by chance; it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with DILIGENCE.”
— Abigail Adams
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
B SN
Exceptionally well qualified at
all levels: In the Accelerated BSN
program, for example, CON
students last year had an average
3.73 GPA at entry.
Ahead:
New roles.
Greater
responsibility.
Higher
expectations.
Blazing new frontiers.
Like those before them, they are eager, enthusiastic, passionate about nursing.
Everything else has changed. Today’s students face a fluid, technology-filled
future in which they must know more, do more, and make fast, critical
MSN
1 As a girl in Chaing Mai, Thailand,
Wattana Barrett wanted to be a nurse. But
when she began university study, she found
that, at 4’11,” she was “too short for nursing."
So she earned a degree in biology and kept
her dream alive as a science teacher. She came
to the U.S., married, and got a job in comparative medicine at UNMC, where she also
volunteered at the Child Life Center and
College of Pharmacy. Meanwhile, she took
nursing prerequisite courses at UNO. She
then began the Accelerated BSN program, an
intensive, one-year path for strong, degreed
students. “My teachers are so understanding
and classmates help out,” she said. “Heart,
cancer, transplant — you gain so much patient
experience here.” She plans to be an ICU nurse
— and, after more school, a nurse anesthetist.
2 Abigail Simende-Tsimba grew up with
her future husband in Harare, Zimbabwe’s
capital and largest city. He came to the U.S.
first, she joined him in 2002, they married,
and she attended Bellevue University, where
the couple had friends. A scholarship to UNO
followed. Abigail majored in biology and
minored in chemistry but found herself
drawn to nursing. “As a career, biology felt
limited and nursing seemed more rewarding,”
she said. Now a level 3 student in the Traditional BSN program, she likes the learning
environment. “There’s one-on-one time with
instructors, and you can go to them with
problems. Students help each other out.”
Obstetrical and pediatric nursing are currently
among her career interests. Her husband
shares her science DNA: he works in the
blood bank reference laboratory of the
American Red Cross.
1
2
PhD
3 Her heart is on her sleeve. “I love
UNMC,” said Lisa Biga. “I love the College
of Nursing.” This high-energy, high-focus
native of Omaha also loves learning. She has
a bachelor’s degree in business and a master’s
in health promotion earned while working
at a Fortune 500 firm. Finding that “not
meaningful,” she then got a BSN degree
while working two jobs, in ICU at one
hospital, in dietetics at another. Her MSN
specialty track, nurse practitioner in women’s
health, fits between full-time work in ICU
and as a graduate assistant. Inspiration came
from her parents, both teachers. Her model
was watching ICU nurses care for her
grandfather: “They helped families. They
gave me strength.” Her goal is to own a
women’s holistic heath clinic focused on
evidence-based practice. Her friends say:
If Lisa wills it, it will happen.
5 For Nadin Abdel Razeq, surgery
opened the door to an advanced nursing
career. While hospitalized in her home
country of Jordan, she found herself thankful for and intrigued by her nursing care.
That interest led her to a BSN degree at
The Hashemite University, a MSN degree
from the University of Jordan, and — after
a web search — to UNMC for her doctoral
nursing studies. Her specialty interest is neonatal and pediatric pain management. There
is “great need” in that area across the world,
she said. As a graduate assistant, she helps
senior faculty with research studies. “People
here are so friendly, open and helpful,” she
said, “with respect for other cultures.” Now
in her second year of PhD study, she plans
to teach, practice and do research in Jordan.
6 Khaled Suleiman would never say so,
but he is a trailblazer of sorts in his home
city of Amman, Jordan. He was the first
exchange student in a collaborative education
accord reached by the College’s international
program director, Dr. Sheila Ryan, and her
peers at Al-Zaytoonah Private University of
Jordan. After obtaining his BSN and MSN
degrees there, Khaled came to UNMC to
concentrate on cardiac surgical nursing. As
a strong student with fluent English skills,
he found the academic transition smooth.
Adjusting to American food and social
customs was hard, he said, but he soon
made “many friends. Everyone is so nice.”
His research interest is sleep disturbances
in patients recovering from cardiac surgery.
After receiving his PhD degree in 2009,
he will teach and practice in Amman.
4 Raised on a farm near Oakland, Iowa,
Melissa “Missy” Snelling became
interested in nursing when, just out of high
school, she assisted the EMT crew with the
local volunteer fire department. That led her
to Omaha for a BSN degree and work in ER
nursing. Seeking more autonomy, she
entered CON’s MSN program in 2007. Her
specialty track is family nurse practitioner,
and she continues to work in ER and as a
graduate assistant. “Care goes above and
beyond here,” she said. At the family nursing
clinic, she said, a team once worked 4 hours
to stabilize a diabetic woman with severe
hypoglycemia and no insurance. “I thought,
‘no where else.’ It’s nice to make a difference.”
She and her husband, a cardiovascular ICU
nurse, expect their second child in August.
3
4
5
6
decisions at high levels of patient care. Here you meet the new face of nursing.
24
2009 advances
www.unmc.edu/nursing
25
DIRECTOR CONTINUING NURSING EDUCATION AND EVALUATION
Forward
Catherine Bevil
RN, EdD
“In 2008,178 PROGRAMS served 16,353 NURSES … Almost half were
402-559-6412 [email protected]
independent ONLINE study … Users come from 49 STATES, U.S. territories and Canada.”
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Widely regarded as an expert
in program evaluation,
Dr. Bevil joined the College
Q. What are CNE requirements?
A. They vary by state. A total of 32 states
require CE for nurses, ranging from a
high of 30 hours every 2 years to 5 hours
each year.
in 1998 and has driven huge
growth in its CNE program.
THE
A D VA N C E S I N T E R V I E W
WITH
C AT H E R I N E B E V I L
College’s
continuing ed
aims high,
reaches far.
Constant need to know.
As the College approaches its 30th year in CNE, much has changed. The learning
landscape shows a seismic shift. Rapid medical progress can outdate knowledge within
a few years. Health care routinely employs technologies not long ago considered
science fiction. It’s now imperative that nurses stay on the front edge of advancement.
26
2009 advances
Q. What’s the scope of the College’s
CNE program?
A. We provide high-quality, low-cost continuing education to nurses throughout
Nebraska and the U.S. We collaborate
with professional groups, medical education firms and providers of continuing
medical and pharmaceutical education.
Our programs span the spectrum of
delivery options, from traditional live
conferences and printed learning materials
to teleconferences, webinars, online
offerings and live video.
Q. What forces shape CNE?
A. Flexibility and convenience, for starters.
Nurses have congested schedules with
little free time. They’re responsible for
satisfying their state’s CE requirements to
maintain licensure, and it can be difficult
to get time off to attend local or out-oftown conferences.
In small towns and rural areas, live learning activities are limited. When time is not
the problem, money can be — CE tuition
reimbursement is often not available.
We solve distance, time and cost constraints
through the web. Many of our offerings
are online, each is available for a year, and
most are at no cost. The entire process,
from registration and learning to evaluation, test and certificate of completion,
can be done anytime via computer.
Q. What sets the College’s CNE apart?
A. Three things, in my view. The first is
quality in every detail of content and
delivery. That flows from the unique
skills of our CNE team, which combines
nursing, program planning, evaluation,
budgeting and IT expertise.
The second is extensive collaboration
with high-quality providers who bring
additional resources. It’s mutually beneficial. Professional organizations and
education firms seek to work with us,
and it’s a major way we’ve built traffic.
Third, we stick to what we do best. Rather
than attempt everything, we serve a subset of the nursing community. Our target
profile is nurses similar to the College’s
graduates: BSN and above. Our site shows
high incidence of MSN users.
Our programs appeal to clinical specialists in areas such as cardiac, oncology and
hemophilia — and to advanced practice
nurses in primary and acute care. In 2008
alone, we brought 26 programs to UNMC
or CON faculty, all at no charge.
Q. How has the CNE program changed
in the last decade?
A. In 1998, 30 learning activities served
1,600 nurses, generating 11,600 contact
hours. Of those, 26 were live meetings
and 4 were independent study. In 2008,
178 programs served 16,353 nurses,
generating 54,112 contact hours. Almost
half were independent online study.
Our first online offering came in 2006;
today, almost all independent study
options are online.To date, we’ve presented
101 online programs. Monographs and
telephone conferences are rare, due to
higher cost and shrinking preference.
Technology has reshaped CNE. Our challenge is to offer state-of-the-art delivery
for younger nurses who grew up with IT
yet serve earlier generations, not all of
whom are comfortable going totally online.
We strive to have choices for both groups.
Q. What elements do users like?
A. The online evaluation system provides
a flexible resource for completion and
award of credits. Nurses can jump in and
out as time allows, returning to where
they were or to review or to reprint documentation certificates.
Q. Describe your online student profile.
A. We’ve had 5,133 registered users since
2006, including over 900 physician
assistants and other health professionals.
Among nurses, master’s degrees are predominant. Users come from 49 states,
U.S. territories and Canada. Of the nearly
20,000 certificates issued, almost 86%
are in primary care areas, followed by 12%
in oncology topics.
Q. What about rural reach?
A. One local indicator is online registration
for conferences, begun in 2007. Of the
total, nearly two-thirds were from outside the metro Omaha and Lincoln areas.
Serving rural and underserved areas is
among our goals.
Q. How is CNE evolving?
A. Primarily in delivery and evaluation.
Today, we go well beyond satisfaction
questions about program presenters
and content. We study effects on nurses
and care — knowledge increase, practice
impact, residual benefit, why and why
not. This helps us link learning activities
to quality care.
Q. What’s ahead?
A. We’re launching an online, multi-module
certificate program in hemophilia nursing
that fills a national need. For the first
time, hemophilia nurses can be certified
for advanced competency through a
formal learning and assessment process.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
27
DONOR REPORT 7/1/07 THROUGH 1/31/09
Donors
This Donor Report reflects support benefiting the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing. We gratefully acknowledge the following
outright gifts made through the University of Nebraska Foundation from 7/1/07 through 1/31/09. These generous contributions were received from
alumni, friends, corporations and foundation. We apologize for any omissions or errors.
The roll of the charitable
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
$500,000 – $999,999
$500 – $999
Carol M. Wilson
Irrevocable Trust
Rita M. Antonson ‘83
Judith S. Billings
Karen R. Eakins ‘58
Nancy A. McCarthy ‘74
Carol & Jack Ott
Victoria Pavlista
Schwab Fund for Charitable
Giving
$100,000 – $499,999
Audrey Solberg Smith ‘47
$10,000 – $99,999
Edward & Lida Robinson
Charitable Trust
G Robert Muchemore
Foundation
Kenneth L Urwiller IRA
Madeleine M. Leininger
Leland J. & Dorothy H. Olson
Charitable Foundation
Linder Family Foundation
Robert J. Martina
Platte Valley National Bank
(Hod Kosman)
Phyllis D. Urwiller ‘52 &
Kenneth L. Urwiller
$5,000 – $9,999
Kearney Clinic Building Corp., Inc.
Kearney Clinic PC
Lawrence & Dixie Raines
$1,000 – $4,999
Betty J. Armagost
Pamela D. Bataillon ‘78
Brookwood Foundation
Janelle R. Davis ‘65
Brenda F. Evans ‘96
Yvonne E. Hamilton ‘56
Sharon Harrison
Cherianne Jacquart ‘66
Ann M. Jaeggi ‘68
Shirley M. Johnson ‘56
Rebecca L. Lefler ‘86
Lindemann Charitable
Foundation II Inc
George & Ada Lindsey
Mary E. Lutz ‘68
National Community Foundation
Regional Radiation Oncology
Care, P.C.
Valerie A. Sparks ‘81
The Cunningham Family
Foundation
Virginia P. Tilden & John Benson
Rosalee C. Yeaworth
Yvonne H. Hamilton IRA
28
2009 advances
$100 – $499
Elaine D. Ackerson ‘71
Teresa L. Anderson ‘81
Berniece F. Cramer Trust
Joyce M. Black ‘81
Donna R. Brodd ‘64
Glendoris Chicoine ‘47
Richard & Gloria Comstock
Linda A. Corson ‘68
LaVerna E. Crooks ‘46
Donn & Ann Delashmutt
Patricia J. Dolan ‘63
Jennifer A. Duncan ‘78
Joel & Vicki Ernst
Grace E. Felthousen ‘58
Lynda S. Gabriel ‘71
Amy D. Graham ‘93
Barry or Cynthia Hillmer
Family Account
Barbara A. Hindman ‘68
Elizabeth A. Hoffman ‘68
Sandra K. Houser ‘87
Katherine A. Kaiser ‘80
Gleneva G. Lorenzen ‘58
Shella F. Malolepszy ‘72
Roberta J. McClary ‘51
Ellen K. McGovern ‘62
Muriel Munchrath Revocable
Trust
Elizabeth A. Murphy ‘91
Joan H. Nakashima ‘51
Marian Newton ‘72
Gloria O'Dowd ‘66
Mary C. Owen ‘59
John R. Pesavento
Debora L. Quinn ‘99
Betty C. Rath ‘49
Arlene F. Reed ‘63
Don & Diane Roney
Linda K. Sather ‘80
Karen L. Schumacher
Melody M. Scott
Marilyn H. Seidel ‘58
Renee D. Shipp ‘74
Amanda A. Smith ‘07
The Norman and Jane Jensen
Revocable Trust
The West Trust
Carol J. Thompson ‘67
Mianna L. Thornton ‘55
Carol L. Toft ‘63
Constance G. Visovsky
Gladys L. West ‘41
Kathryn Wolfe
Elsie E. Weyrauch ‘49
Lani M. Zimmerman ‘75
Under $100
Betty J. Anderson ‘49
Dorothy E. Arnold ‘88
Constance L. Avey ‘70
Helen L. Baird ‘49
Sharon K. Baker ‘94
Suzanne L. Bakken ‘99
Jean D. Balogh ‘83
Constance L. Barksdale ‘79
Alice I. Baron ‘42
Frances J. Bauer ‘51
Lorna L. Baumgartner ‘63
Deborah J. Becker ‘99
Kathleen G. Becker ‘93
Jed E. Bespalec ‘00
Kathleen A. Bickerstaff ‘90
Catherine I. Binstock ‘84
Connie J. Booth ‘80
Leroy & Jeanne Bower
Cathy L. Broz ‘80
Shirley A. Chavanu ‘93
Chris Lake Homeowners
Association
Lissa D. Clark ‘96
Robert & Patricia Clover
David & Marlene Cohen
Companion Dog Club of
Omaha & Council Bluffs
Joy M. Coon ‘47
Sally M. Davenport ‘80
D. Douglas & Donna Davis
Maureen Davis ‘76
Scott A. Dobson ‘98
Margery A. Dolph ‘53
Dusty G. Duis ‘00
Don & Carol Duple
Marilyn L. Dutton ‘58
Nicole J. Dyer ‘06
Debra J. Erikson ‘76
Verna K. Eucker ‘52
Jean M. Feuerbach ‘82
Kathryn L. Fiandt
Mary J. Garrett ‘76
Joan G. Gatz
Marlene H. Gatz
Anthony & Nuran Giampaolo
Kathleen A. Glenn ‘72
Rodney J. Gorman ‘03
Renee A. Grams ‘05
Christine K. Grossman ‘80
Patricia L. Gullberg ‘73
Mary A. Hagen ‘75
Jennifer J. Hall ‘99
Cynthia K. Hall ‘86
Bertha F. Hanson ‘67
Lori J. Harner ‘92
Judith C. Harrington ‘86
Virginia L. Harris ‘59
Pamela A. Harvey ‘69
Patsy L. Hawkins ‘64
Bevely J. Hays ‘66
Florence B. Hentzen ‘94
Teresa M. Hergott ‘88
Marijo L. Herman ‘83
Jennifer L. Hiser ‘97
Margaret M. Hoarty ‘74
Paul & Jennie Register Hoff
Verna J. Holliman ‘60
Diane G. Hudson ‘83
Linda C. Hughes ‘02
Elizabeth I. Jackson ‘98
Julie A. Johng ‘77
Sheryl F. Jones ‘65
Margaret M. Kaiser ‘76
Kenneth D. Kappeler
Annabelle M. Keene ‘82
Kennard & Virginia Johnson
Family Trust
Sharyl L. Kuhnen ‘74
Louise M. LaFramboise
Lakeshore Ladies Club Ladies
of the Lakes
Barbara A. Lankford ‘68
Marjory B. Laymon ‘49
Marlene G. Lindeman ‘80
Patricia D. Lopez ‘90
Beverly J. Mace-May ‘59
Theresa J. Mackel ‘85
Julie A. Mawyer
Christy A. McAndrew ‘91
Linda K. McGuire ‘77
Hannah K. McKay ‘45
Mary A. Megel
Connie C. Meier
Jonora D. Mejia ‘77
Kimberly K. Meschede ‘06
Connie L. Miller ‘93
Courtney A. Miller ‘07
Rozanne Milner ‘93
Betty J. Milton ‘47
Patricia A. Moeller ‘89
Patricia J. Mommsen ‘75
Samantha E. Montgomery ‘04
Virginia A. Murphy ‘73
Nebraska Association of
Perianesthesia Nurses
Larhea A. Nichols ‘79
Linda S. Niles ‘93
Mary J. Osterholm ‘81
Dennis & Kathryn Owens
Mary M. Peck
Peggy Pelish ‘75
Peter Schaar IRA
Mary J. Pietz ‘40
Josephine M. Pinckley ‘52
Kathleen A. Popelka ‘82
Carrie A. Puls ‘98
Mary C. Raymer ‘71
Richard T. & Lani M. Pszanka
Living Trust
Mary P. Roh ‘96
Denise A. Rycek
Ethel G. Sawtell ‘49
Julie H. Schaar ‘59
Rita K. Schmitz ‘83
Paula S. Schulz ‘80
Steven A. Seamans ‘81
Rosa Linda Seamons ‘80
Lucinda J. Seidl ‘71
Joann K. Seiler ‘65
Cindy L. Selig ‘77
Yaewon Seo
Claudia G. Sherman
Janice C. Skinner ‘56
F. Miles Skultety
Meredith J. Smidt ‘73
Heather A. Sorensen ‘97
Judith M. Spaen ‘79
Debra K. Starr ‘98
Jill D. Stevenson ‘94
Ashlee J. Stofferahn ‘07
Christina L. Stumbo ‘01
Jennifer P. Sutton ‘98
Genevieve M. Tanner ‘55
Bernadine B. Taplin
Karen S. Teten ‘85
Angela L. Tewfik ‘03
The Boeing Company
Shirley R. Thomley ‘58
Cheryl Thompson
Sarah A. Thompson
Alma L. Tompsett ‘44
Tammy S. Turnbull ‘91
Carolyn S. Tyler ‘83
UNMC-CON, Kearney Division
Eugene & Debora Volnek
Ruth E. Vyhlidal ‘78
Andrew E. Waldman ‘05
Charles & Jean Warren
Mary J. Wendl
Kirsten A. Wertz
Susan L. Wilhelm
Margaret E. Wilson
Mary J. Winter ‘58
Terrin A. Wolf ‘06
Kathryn D. Yost ‘69
Diane R. Zacher ‘94
College of
Nursing Alumni
Association
CONAA New Life
Members 2008 – 2009
Heather S. Swanson ’99
Donors to CONAA
5/1/08 – 03/1/09
Jean C. Bateman ’50
Joyce M. Black ’81
Ruth A. Macnamara ’93
Joan J. Maurer ’47
Patricia W. Nelson ’85
Marian Newton
Janet C. Podoll ’76
Mary J. Rogers ’73
Jeffrey L. Schrader ’94
Ruth M. Stevens ’53
CONAA White
Coat Donors
7/1/08 – 01/31/09
Betty A. Adams ’67
Meggan R. Anderson ’06
Teresa L. Anderson ’81
Rita M. Antonson ’83
Sandra R. Ash ’77
Brenda L. Avery ’78
Sharon K. Baker ’94
Suzanne L. Bakken ’99
Jean D. Balogh ’83
Constance L. Barksdale ’79
Susan A. Barnason ’80
Donna J. Barnes ’89
Pamela D. Bataillon ’78
Jean M. Bateman ’50
Rachel I. Bayless ’50
Ann M. Berger ’84
Brenda Bergman-Evans ’96
Carissa Beutler-Schneider ’75
Kathleen A. Bickerstaff ’90
Joyce M. Black ’81
Shirley R. Bradsby ’57
Katherine S. Bravo ’04
Naomi A. Brown ’74
Cathy L. Broz ’80
Mindy S. Bryan ’96
Christie K.Campbell-Grossman’80
Marjorie M. Cantor ’47
Terri L. Carr ’76
Lucienne A. Case ’03
Rhonda E. Caswell ’46
Norma J. Cece ’56
Kathleen Chavanu-Gorman ’89
Glendoris Chicoine ’47
Suzanne J. Choiniere ’54
Lissa D. Clark ’96
David & Marlene Cohen
Ernestine M. Cook ’79
Joy M. Coon ’47
Janet E. Cuddigan ’78
Lois A. Dauel ’95
Sally M. Davenport ’80
Janelle R. Davis ’65
Scott A. Dobson ’01
Danielle L. Dohrmann ’91
Jill A. Dougherty ’76
Meredith H. DuBois ’52
Dusty G. Duis ’00
Kathleen A. Duncan ’83
Kay Dunder ’61
Nicole J. Dyer ’06
Verna K. Eucker ’52
Anita J. Evers ’72
Celeste M. Felix ’82
Sharon L. Field ’69
Karen M. Fischer ’66
Cynthia P. Francisco ’91
Melissa K. Fulton ’91
Lynda S. Gabriel ’71
Doris L. Goff ’55
Rodney J. Gorman ’03
Kathryn M. Grams ’70
Karen A. Grigsby
Gloria J. Gross ’63
Sharon K. Hadenfeldt ’82
Lori J. Harner ’92
Judith C. Harrington ’86
Virginia L. Harris ’59
Margie L. Hayes ’76
Lorraine L. Hedman ’62
Florence B. Hentzen ’94
Teresa M. Hergott ’88
Amy S. Hickman ’88
Carol A. Hinkle ’96
Anne Hippe ’97
Jennifer L. Hiser ’97
Katherine A.Hoebelheinrich’97
Verna J. Holliman ’60
Sharon B. Holyoke ’66
Diane G. Hudson ’83
G. Joan Huffer ’54
Diane L. Hughes ’80
Linda C. Hughes ’02
The Norman and Jane Jensen
Revocable Trust
Julie A. Johng ’77
Kathleen K. Johnson ’63
Shirley M. Johnson ’56
L. Colette Jones ’58
Katherine A. Kaiser ’80
Margaret M. Kaiser ’76
Rebecca L. Keating-Lefler ’86
Ruth A. Kiekhaefer ’59
Cynthia A. Kildare ’80
Marilyn Kuehn ’49
Louise M. LaFramboise
Nancy J. Lasich ’82
Mindy E. Lavicky ’01
Kimberly L. Leighton ’82
Marlene G. Lindeman ’80
De Lilia M. Lodge ’64
Sandra K. Luedke ’60
Joan M. Mack ’83
Theresa J. Mackel ’85
Julie A. Mawyer
Christy A. McAndrew ’91
Marilyn A. McCubbin ’60
Linda K. McGuire ’77
Hannah K. McKay ’45
Elizabeth A. McNeely ’60
Mary A. Megel
Jonora D. Mejia ’77
Kimberly K. Meschede ’06
Sheryl L. Messinger ’76
Linda J. Miers ’71
Connie L. Miller ’93
Connie L. Milliken ’67
Betty J. Milton ’47
Patricia A. Moeller ’89
Patricia J. Mommsen ’75
Muriel Munchrath Revocable
Trust
Virginia A. Murphy ’73
Patricia W. Nelson ’85
Marian Newton ’72
Shelley K. Nielsen ’74
Linda S. Niles ’93
Shirley M. O'Bannon ’52
Sheila M. O'Day ’85
Gloria A. O'Dowd ’61
Margaret M. Ofe-Fleck ’81
Michaela A. OKane ’84
Mary J. Osterholm ’81
Z. Louise Paone ’51
Dorothy M. Patach ’44
Lynnee M. Pattrin ’75
Peggy L. Pelish ’75
Mary C. Petersen ’78
Steven R. Pitkin
Janet C. Podoll ’76
Richard T. & Lani M. Pszanka
Living Trust
Carol H. Pullen
Mary C. Raymer ’71
Arlene F. Reed ’63
Helen C. Rees ’43
Susan K. Rock ’93
Mary J. Rogers ’73
E. Josephine Rutt ’47
Robert & Denise Rycek
Barbara J. Sand ’81
Linda K. Sather ’80
Louise Schleich ’57
Rita K. Schmitz ’83
Paula S. Schulz ’80
Karen L. Schumacher
Rosa L. Seamans ’80
Steven A. Seamans ’81
Lucinda J. Seidl ’71
Cindy L. Selig ’77
Yaewon Seo
Jackie Severa ’52
Judy M. Seydel ’61
Carmen L. Shannon ’90
Jennifer L. Simmons ’91
Barbara J. Sittner ’90
Meredith J. Smidt ’73
Audrey F. Smith ’47
Winnie G. Sonderman ’38
Heather A. Sorensen ’97
Debra K. Starr ’98
Jill D. Stevenson ’94
Ashlee J. Stofferahn ’07
Christina L. Stumbo ’01
Robin A. Stoupa ’76
Jennifer P. Sutton ’98
Heather S. Swanson ’99
Genevieve M. Tanner ’55
Karen S. Teten ’85
Carol J. Thompson ’67
Cheryl L. Thompson ’75
Mark & Cheryl Thompson
Sarah A. Thompson
Virginia P. Tilden
Janet K. Toomsen ’75
Tammy S. Turnbull ’91
Carolyn S. Tyler ’83
Marilyn J. Vaught ’53
Constance G. Visovsky
Gretchen Vondrak ’69
Ruth E. Vyhlidal ’78
Janet R. Walter ’00
Lori A. Welch-Nelson ’82
Mary Wendl & Joe Zaborowski
Kirsten A. Wertz
Alison E. White ’04
Susan L. Wilhelm
Jean W. Wilshusen ’61
Margaret E. Wilson
Mary J. Winter ’58
Margery Woodman ’69
Kathryn Wolfe
Rosalee C. Yeaworth
Dorthea J. Yeutter ’41
Kathryn D. Yost ’69
Margaret J. Young ’55
Diane R. Zacher ’94
www.unmc.edu/nursing
29
FUNDED FOR FISCAL YEAR 08-09
Grants
Research, education & training
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Faculty
Barnason, S. (P.I.) M., Hertzog,
Sankaranarayanan, J., American Nurses
Foundation, Piloting of a Medication Education
& Decision-Making (MED) Intervention for
Elderly Heart Failure Home Health Care
Patients. 10/20/06–10/8/08.
Barnason, S. (P.I.) CON Boost Award, Older
Adults’ Perceptions of the Early Recovery Period
After a Cardiac Event. 9/1/08 – 12/31/08.
Berger, A. (P.I.) Grem, J., UNMC Eppley
Cancer Center Translational/Collaborative
Research Award, Patterns and Relationships of
Fatigue and Other Factors During Chemotherapy
for Colorectal Cancer. 1/1/06 –6/30/09.
Berger, A. (P.I.) Grem, J., ONS Foundation,
Fatigue and Related Factors During Chemotherapy
for Colorectal Cancer. 3/15/06 – 3/15/09.
Brage-Hudson, D. (P.I.) Campbell-Grossman,
C., Keating-Lefler, R., Foxall, M., Hertzog, M.,
Pridham, K., Brennan, P. National Institutes of
Health, National Institute of Nursing Research
R15 Grant, Web Based Intervention for African
American Mothers. 1 R15 NR009996-01A1.
9/1/05 – 8/31/08.
Chaperon, C. (P.I.) Rasmussen, N. Univ. of
Iowa Gerontological Nursing Interventions
Research Center, Blood Pressure Rhythm PreIntervention Study in VCD-induced
Perimenopausal Mice. 9/1/07– 3/31/09.
Cohen, M. (P.I.) University of Texas, MD
Anderson Cancer Center (Prime Award
National Institutes of Health 5R01CA12229203; Bruera, E. PI) Parenteral Hydration in
Advanced Cancer Patients: A Randomized
Controlled Trial. 10/01/08 – 7/31/09.
30
2009 advances
Cohen, M. (P.I.) University of Texas, MD
Anderson Cancer Center (Prime Award
National Institutes of Health 5R01NR01016203; Bruera, E. PI), Methylphenidate for Fatigue
in Advanced Cancer Patients Symptom.
10/031/08 – 6/30/09.
Cohen, M. (P.I.) University of Texas, MD
Anderson Cancer Center (Prime Award
American Cancer Society PEP-08-272-01-PC1;
Zhukovsky, D. PI), Symptom Profiles in English
and Spanish-Speaking Children. 8/31/08– 8/30/11.
Cuddigan, J. (P.I.) National Pressure Ulcer
Advisory Panel, Pressure Ulcer Treatment
Guidelines Revision. 7/1/07 – 9/30/09.
Filipi, M. (P.I.) MARS Foundation, Impact of
Structured Weight Resistance Training on
Balance in MS Patients. 7/1/07 – 6/30/10.
Fletcher, B. (P.I.) , Lydiatt, W., Schumacher,
K., Hertzog, M., Yorkston, K., Eadie, T.
CON Dean’s Cancer Research Initiative,
Communicative Participation After Head And
Neck Cancer Treatment: Effects On Survivors
And Their Family Caregivers. 8/1/08 – 7/31/09.
Head, B. (P.I.) Univ. of Iowa Gerontological
Nursing Interventions Research Center,
Mentoring Grant in Gertontological Training.
9/1/07 – 8/31//09.
Houfek, J. (P.I.) Daughton, D., Hertzog, M.,
Reiser, G., Rennard, S. CON Research Award,
Effect of Genetic Education on Smoking: A
Feasibility Study. 3/1/07 – 2/19/09.
Kaiser, M. (P.I.) Kaiser, K., Barry, T., Agrawal, S.
CON Research Award: Becoming a Mother:
Healthy Effects of Life Transition in Pregnant
Low Income Women. 11/2/07 – 11/1/08.
LaFramboise, L. (P.I.) Yates, B., Schumacher, K.
CON Research Award, Impact of Family
Caregiving with Heart Failure. 3/1/07 – 2/28/09.
Pozehl, B. (P.I.) Duncan, K., Norman, J.,
Hertzog, M. American Nurses Foundation,
Psychometric Testing of Measures to Estimate
Energy Expenditure in Elderly Heart Failure
Patients. 9/1/07 –9/30/09.
Pullen, C. (P.I.) Walker, S., Hageman, P.,
Boeckner, L., Hertzog, M., Hulme, P., Fayad, P.
Karnja, N., Minor, M. National Institutes of
Health, National Institute of Nursing Research
R01 Grant, Modifying Lifestyle in Prehypertensive
Older Rural Women. 2 R01 NR04861-05A2.
8/1/06–5/31/11.
Rasmussen, N. (P.I.) Chaperon, C.
UNO/NASA Nebraska Space Grant, Variation
in Clock and Pain Gene Expression in In-bred
Strains of Mice. 2/1/08 – 12/31/08.
Rodehorst, K. (P.I.) Wilhelm, S., Stepans,
M., Hertzog, M., Schlenker, E., Stout, J.,
Robertson, D., Kanade, S. Aberdeen Area
Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board, Screening
for Asthma Among Children in Northern Plains
Tribal Communities. 9/15/05 – 9/14/09.
Schulz, P. (P.I.) CON Research Award, Elderly
Patients Knowledge and Use of Symptom
Management Strategies Following Coronary
Artery Bypass Surgery. 6/9/08 – 6/9/09.
Schumacher, K. (P.I.) Subaward Agreement
with University of California, San Francisco
(Prime Award National Institutes of Health,
National Cancer Institute R01 CA116423;
Miaskowski, C, PI), Improving Cancer Pain
Management Through Self Care. 4/1/08 – 7/31/12.
Seo, Y. (P.I.) LaFramboise, L., Dumitru, I. CON
Research Award, Factors Related To Disability in
Activites of Daily Living in Persons with Heart
Failure. 11/2/07–1/1/09.
Thompson, S. (P.I.). Tilden, V., Wan, T.,
Petroski, G., Scott-Cawiezel, J. National
Institutes of Health, National Institute of
Nursing Research R01 Grant, The Impact of
Quality End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes.
7 R01 NR009547-02, 12/15/06 – 11/30/10.
Visovsky, C. (P.I.) Buresh, R., Courneya, K.,
Bovaird, J. CON Dean’s Cancer Research
Initiative, Heading Off Peripheral Neuropathy
with Exercise (HOPE). 8/1/08 – 7/31/09.
Graduate Students
McCabe, P. (P.I.) Waltman, N. (Advisor) Sigma
Theta Tau International, Predictors of Symptoms
and Psychological Distress in Patients with
Recurrent Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation.
6/1/08 – 5/31/09.
Rines, K. (P.I.) Waltman, N. (Advisor)
American Cancer Society, Masters Degree
Scholarships in Cancer Nursing. 8/1/07–7/31/09.
Waltman, N. (P.I.) CON Boost Award,
Prevention of Osteoporosis in Breast Cancer
Survivors on Aromatase Inhibitors.
2/1/09 – 6/30/09.
Trewhitt, P. (P.I.) Waltman, N. (Advisor).
American Cancer Society, Masters Degree
Scholarships in Cancer Nursing. 8/1/08 – 7/31/10.
Wiggins, S. (P.I.) Freeman, J. CON Boost
Award, Sleep Actigraphy in a Group of Child
and Adolescents. 6/6/08 – 6/6/09.
Educational/Special Projects
Wilhelm, S. (P.I.) Community Healthcare
Foundation, Motivational Interviewing to
Promote Sustained Breastfeeding: Hispanic
Mothers. 7/1/08 – 6/30/09.
Wilhelm, S. (P.I.) Regional West Foundation,
Motivational Interviewing to Promote
Sustained Breastfeeding: Hispanic Mothers.
10/1/08 – 9/30/09.
Wilhelm, S. (P.I.) Rodehorst, K., Poole, J.,
Wambach, K., Weinert, C. CON Research
Award, Motivational Interviewing to Promote
Sustained Breastfeeding: Hispanic Mothers.
6/9/08 – 6/9/09.
Zimmerman, L. (P.I.) CON Boost Award,
Early Recovery Telehealth Intervention for Women
After Cardiac Surgery. 10/6/08 – 12/31/08.
Barry, T. (P.D.) U.S. Dept of Health & Human
Services, Nursing Education Practice and
Retention Grant, CFDA 93.359, Reducing
Disparities in Type 2 Diabetes Care Through a
State-Wide Network of Nursing Centers.
6 D11HP08312-01-01. 7/1/07– 6/30/12.
Bataillon, P. (P.D.) U.S. Dept of Health &
Human Services, Health Care and Other
Facilities Grant, CFDA 93.887, Twenty-first
Century Environment for Nursing.
1 C76HF10361-01-00. 7/1/08 – 6/30/09.
Cramer, M. (P.D.) Region 6 Behavioral
Healthcare Services, Tobacco Free Nebraska
Program (MOTAC). 7/1/08 – 6/30/09.
Cramer, M. (P.D.) Charles Drew Health Center,
Evaluation of Douglas County Healthy Start
Initiative. 6/1/08 – 5/31/09.
Kaiser, K. (P.D.) Lancaster County Medical
Society, Medicaid Enrollment Center Contract.
7/1/08 – 6/30/09.
LaFramboise, L. (P.D.) Miller, C., Jensen, J.
University of No. Carolina at Chapel Hill,
QSEN Project – Pilot School Learning
Collaborative. 7/15/07 – 6/30/09.
Megel, M. (P.D.) Black, J., Clark, L., Carstens, P.,
Agrawal, S. CON Education Award, Decreasing
Anxiety in Nursing Students Through the Use of
SimBaby Minikin.™ 11/1/06 –11/1/08.
Miller, C. (P.D.) LaFramboise, L., Nieveen, J.
CON Education Award, Student Learning
Outcomes after Intergration of Quality and
Safety Education Competencies into the
Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum: A Pilot
Study. 4/14/08 – 4/13/09.
Sittner, B. (P.D.) McGivney-Liechti, K.,
Brage-Hudson, D. March of Dimes (Nebraska
Chapter), Centering Pregnancy Program
for People’s Health Center. 1/1/09 – 12/31/09.
Sather, L. (P.D.) The Nebraska Affiliate of
Susan G. Komen For the Cure, Primary
and Secondary Breast Cancer Prevention for
Underserved Women in Nebraska. 4/1/08 –3/31/09.
Thompson, C. (P.D.) Farris, N. CON
Education Award, Second Life as an Adjunct
to Community Health Nursing Education:
A Demonstration and Feasibility Project.
11/20/08 – 11/19/09.
Visovsky, C. (P.D.) U.S. Dept of Health &
Human Services, Professional Nurse Traineeship,
2 A10 HP 00056-09-00. 07/01/08 – 06/30/09.
Grigsby, K. (P.D.) Ellermeier, M., Stuart, N.
CON Education Award, Coaching Undergraduate
Students to Academic Success. 10/10/08 – 11/9/09.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
31
2008 — 2009
Publication
Professional journals
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
Publications 2008
BARNASON, SUE
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, Nieveen, J., Schulz, P., Miller,
C., Hertzog, M. & Rasmussen, D. (2008). The relationships
between fatigue and early postoperative recovery outcomes
over time in elderly coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)
surgery patients. Heart & Lung, 37(4), 245-256.
Nieveen, J. L., Zimmerman, L. M., Barnason, S. A., & Yates,
B. C. (2008). Development and content validity testing of the
cardiac symptom survey in patients after coronary artery
bypass grafting. Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and
Critical Care, 37(1), 17-27.
BERGER, ANN
Berger, A., & Mitchell, S. (2008). Modifying cancer-related
fatigue by optimizing sleep quality. Journal of the National
Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN, 6(1), 3-13.
Berger, A., Wielgus, K., Young-McCaughan, S., Fischer, P.,
Farr, L. & Lee, K. (2008). Methodological challenges when
using actigraphy in clinical populations. Journal of Pain and
Symptom Management, 36(2), 191-199.
Berger, A. M., Kuhn, B. R, Farr, L. A., Lynch, J. C, Agrawal, S.,
Chamberlain, J., & Von Essen, S. G. (2008). Behavioral therapy intervention trial to improve sleep quality and cancerrelated fatigue. Psycho-Oncology DOI 10.1002/pon.1438
online 12/17/08 PMID 19090531.
Doorenbos, A., Berger, A. M., Brohard-Holbert, C.,
Kozachik, S., Varricchio, C., Wood, G., Mallory, G., & Eaton,
L. (2008). Oncology Nursing Society putting evidence into
practice resources: Where are we now and what is next?
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 12(6), 965-970.
Doorenbos, A. Z., Berger, A. M., Brohard-Holbert, C. B.,
Eaton, L., Kozachik, S., LoBiondo-Wood, G., Mallory, G.,
Rue, T., & Varricchio, C. (2008). Year 2008 Research Priorities
Survey. Oncology Nursing Forum, 35(6), E100-107.
Visovsky, C., Berger, A., Kosloski, K., & Kercher, K. (2008).
Methodological challenges of symptom management
research in recurrent cancer. Cancer Nursing, 31(3), 175-181.
CAMPBELL-GROSSMAN, CHRISTIE
Hudson, D. B., Campbell-Grossman, C. G., KeatingLefler, R., & Cline, P. (2008). New Mothers Network: The
development of an internet-based social support intervention for African American mothers. Issues in Comprehensive
Pediatric Nursing, 31, 23-25.
CHAMBERLAIN, JULIE
Berger, A. M., Kuhn, B. R, Farr, L. A., Lynch, J. C, Agrawal, S.,
Chamberlain, J., & Von Essen, S. G. (2008). Behavioral therapy intervention trial to improve sleep quality and cancerrelated fatigue. Psycho-Oncology DOI 10.1002/pon.1438
published online 12/17/08.
COHEN, MARLENE
Bruera, E., Willey, J., Cohen, M.Z., & Palmer, L. (2008).
Expressive writing in patients receiving palliative care: a feasibility study. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 11(1), 15-19.
Bisanz, A., Palmer, J. L., Reddy, S., Cloutier, L., Dixon, T.,
Cohen, M. Z., & Bruera, E. (2008). Characterizing paralytic
postoperative ileus as evidence for future research and clinical practice. Gastroenterology Nursing Journal, 31(5), 336-344.
Kitrungrote, L., Wongkongkul, T., Chanprasit, C., Suttharangsee, W., & Cohen, M. Z. (2008). Experiences of caregivers
of spouses with head and neck cancer undergoing radiation
therapy. Thai Journal of Nursing Research, 12(3), 207-219.
32
2009 advances
Vellone, E., Piras, G., Talucci, C., & Cohen, M.Z. (2008).
Quality of life for caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s
disease, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 61(2), 222-231.
Huettner, F., Rawlings, A.L., McVay, W.B., & Crawford, D.L.
(2008). Robot-assisted laparoscopic colectomy: 70 cases —
one surgeon. Journal of Robotic Surgery, 2(4), 227-234.
DUNCAN, KATHLEEN
MILLER, CONNIE
Pozehl, B., Duncan, K., Hertzog, M. (2008). The effects of
exercise training on fatigue and dyspnea in heart failure.
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 7, 127-132.
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, Nieveen, J., Schulz, P., Miller,
C., Hertzog, M. & Rasmussen, D. (2008). The relationships
between fatigue and early postoperative recovery outcomes
over time in elderly coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)
surgery patients. Heart & Lung, 37 (4), 245-256.
Abbott, A., Schwartz, M., Hercinger, M., Miller, C., & Foyt,
M. (2008). Predictors of success on National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses for accelerated baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nurse Educator, 33(1), 5-6.
FLETCHER, BARB
Fletcher, B. A. S., Miaskowski, C., Dodd, M. J., &
Schumacher, K. L. (2008). A review of the literature on the
symptom experience of family caregivers of patients with
cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum Online Exclusive.
Fletcher, B. S., Paul, S. M., Dodd, M., Schumacher, K., West,
C., Cooper, B., et al. (2008). Prevalence, severity, and impact
of symptoms on female family caregivers of patients at the
initiation of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Journal of
Clinical Oncology, 26(4), 599-605.
GROSS, GLORIA
Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss, J., Gross, G., Lindsey, A.,
Moore, T. (2008). Bone mineral density and bone turnover
in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer. Cancer
Nursing, 31(3), 182-190.
HERTZOG, MELODY
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, L., Nieveen, J., Schulz, P.,
Miller, C., Hertzog, M., et al. (2008). The relationships
between fatigue and early postoperative recovery outcomes
over time in elderly coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)
surgery patients. Heart & Lung, 37(4), 245-256.
Wilhelm, S., Rodehorst, K., Stepans, M. B. F., Hertzog, M.,
& Berens, C. (2008). Influence of levels of intention to breastfeed for six months and breastfeeding self-efficacy on duration of breastfeeding. Applied Nursing Research, 21, 123-130.
Hertzog, M. (2008). Considerations in determining sample size
for pilot studies. Research in Nursing and Health, 31(2), 180-191.
Peterson, J. A., Yates, B. C., & Hertzog, M. (2008). Heart and
soul physical activity program: Social support outcomes.
American Journal of Health Behavior, 32(5), 525-537.
HOUFEK, JULIA
Houfek, J. F., Atwood, J. R., Wolfe, R. M., Agrawal, S., Reiser,
G., Schaefer, G. B., et al. (2008). Knowledge and beliefs about
genetics and smoking among visitors and staff at a healthcare facility. Public Health Nursing, 25, 77-87.
HUDSON, DIANE BRAGE
Hudson, D. B., Campbell-Grossman, C. G., KeatingLefler, R., & Cline, P. (2008). New Mothers Network: The
development of an internet-based social support intervention for African American mothers. Issues in Comprehensive
Pediatric Nursing, 31, 23-25.
KEATING-LEFLER, REBECCA
Hudson, D. B., Campbell-Grossman, C. G., KeatingLefler, R., & Cline, P. (2008). New Mothers Network: The
development of an internet-based social support intervention for African American mothers. Issues in Comprehensive
Pediatric Nursing, 31, 23-25.
MCVAY, WENDY
Crawford, D.L. & McVay, W.B. (2008). Delayed presentation
of colonic impalement injury by picture frame glass fragment treated using hand-assisted laparoscopic colectomy.
[Case Reports]. Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy & Percutaneous Techniques, 18(6), 619-621.
NIEVEEN, JANET
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, L., Nieveen, J., Schulz, P.,
Miller, C., Hertzog, M., Rasmussen, D. (2008). The relationships between fatigue and early postoperative recovery outcomes over time in elderly coronary artery bypass graft
(CABG) surgery patients. Heart & Lung, 37(4), 245-256.
Nieveen, J. L., Zimmerman, L. M., Barnason, S. A., &
Yates, B. C. (2008). Development and content validity testing of the Cardiac Symptom Survey in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting. Heart & Lung: The Journal of
Acute and Critical Care, 37(1), 17-27.
POZEHL, BUNNY
Pozehl, B., Duncan, K., Hertzog, M. (2008). The effects of
exercise training on fatigue and dyspnea in heart failure.
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 7, 127-132.
RICE, MICHAEL
symptom experience of family caregivers of patients with
cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum. Published online in March.
Fletcher, B. S., Paul, S. M., Dodd, M., Schumacher, K., West,
C., Cooper, B., et al. (2008). Prevalence, severity, and impact
of symptoms on female family caregivers of patients at the
initiation of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Journal of
Clinical Oncology, 26(4), 599-605.
Schumacher, K. L., Stewart, B. J., Archbold, P. G., Caparro,
M., Mutale, F., & Agrawal, S. (2008). The effects of caregiving
demand, mutuality and preparedness on family caregiver outcomes during cancer treatment. Oncology Nursing Forum, 49-56.
Schumacher, K. L. (2008). Constant comparisons and constant conundrums: Twenty years of grounded theorizing about
family caregiving. Studies in Symbolic Interaction, 32, 87-102.
SEO, YAEWON
Griffin, M. T. Q., Salman, A., Lee, Y.-H, Seo, Y., & Fitzpatrick,
J. J. (2008). A beginning look at the spiritual practices of
older adults. Journal of Christian Nursing, 25(2), 100-102.
Seo, Y., Roberts, B.L., Pina, I, & Dolansky, M (2008). Predictors
of motor tasks essential for daily activities among persons
with heart failure. Journal of Cardiac Failure.14(4), 296-302.
THOMPSON, CHERYL
Thompson, C. B. (2008). Basics of research part 12: Data
management. Air Medical Journal, 27, 156-158.
THOMPSON, SARAH
Carpenter, J. & Thompson, S. (2008). The experience of
being a CNA: It’s in my soul. Journal of Gerontological
Nursing, 34(9), 25-32.
Duncan, J.G., Thompson, S., & Bott, M.J. (2008). Unmet
symptom management needs of nursing home residents
with cancer. Cancer Nursing. 31, 265-273.
Bern-Klug, M., & Thompson, S. (2008). Responsibilities of
family members to nursing home residents: “She’s the only
mother I got.” Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 34, 43-52.
Thompson, S. & Parker-Oliver, D. (2008). A new model
for long-term care: Balancing palliative and restorative care
delivery. Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 22, 1-26.
Rice, M. J. (2008). Metasynthesis: Qualitative data in
evidence based psychiatric care. Journal of the American
Psychiatric Nurses Association, 14, 382-385.
Rice, M. J. (2008). Evidence based practice: The future is now.
Journal of theAmerican Psychiatric Nurses Association, 14, 379-381.
Rice, M. J. (2008). Psychiatric mental health evidence based
practice. Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, 14(2), 107-111.
Rice, M. J., & Records, K. (2008). Comparative analysis of
physiological adaptation of neonates of abused and
nonabused mothers. Journal of Forensic Nursing, 4(2),
80-90. PMID: 18522606.
Rice, M. J. (2008). Evidence based practice in psychiatric
care: Defining levels of evidence. Journal of the American
Psychiatric Nurses Association, 14(3), 181-187.
Rice, M. J., & Records, K. (2008). HIPAA’s preconsent:
Impact on study validity. Journal American Psychiatric
Nurses Association, 14(3), 225-230.
Visovsky, C., Berger, A., Kosloski, K., & Kercher, K. (2008).
Methodological challenges of symptom management
research in recurrent cancer. Cancer Nursing, 31(3), 175-181.
RODEHORST, KIM
WALTMAN, NANCY
Wilhelm, S., Rodehorst, K., Stepans, M. B. F., Hertzog, M.,
& Berens, C. (2008). Influence of levels of intention to breastfeed for six months and breastfeeding self-efficacy on duration of breastfeeding. Applied Nursing Research, 21, 123-130.
SCHULZ, PAULA
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, L., Nieveen, J., Schulz, P.,
Miller, C., Hertzog, M., et al. (2008). The relationships
between fatigue and early postoperative recovery outcomes
over time in elderly coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)
surgery patients. Heart & Lung, 37(4), 245-256.
SCHUMACHER, KAREN
Fletcher, B. A. S., Miaskowski, C., Dodd, M. J., &
Schumacher, K. L. (2008). A review of the literature on the
TWISS, JANICE
Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss, J., Gross, G., Lindsey, A.,
Moore, T. (2008). Bone mineral density and bone turnover
in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer. Cancer
Nursing, 31(3), 182-190.
VISOVSKY, CONNIE
Bohaty, K., Rocole, H., Wehling, K., & Waltman, N. (2008).
Testing the effectiveness of an educational intervention to
increase dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D in young
adult women. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse
Practitioners, 20, 93-99.
Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss, J., Gross, G., Lindsey, A.,
Moore, T. (2008). Bone mineral density and bone turnover
in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer. Cancer
Nursing, 31(3), 182-190.
WIELGUS, KIM
Berger, A., Wielgus, K., Young-McCaughan, S., Fischer, P.,
Farr, L. & Lee, K. (2008). Methodological challenges when
using actigraphy in clinical populations. Journal of Pain and
Symptom Management, 36(2), 191-199.
WIGGINS, SHIRLEY
FLETCHER, BARB
Wiggins. S.A. (2008). Pain following pediatric tonsillectomy
and adenoidectomy: What do we know about home pain
management? Pediatric Pain Letter 2008, 10(1), 1-6. Online
access at www.pediatric-pain.ca/ppl.
Fletcher, B. A. S., Miaskowski, C., Schumacher, K. L., Dodd,
M., Paul, S. M., Cooper, B. A., Lee, K., West, C., Aouizerat, B.
E., Swift, P. S., & Wara, W. (2009). Trajectories of fatigue in
family caregivers of patients undergoing radiation therapy
for prostate cancer. Research in Nursing & Health, 32, 125139.
WILHELM, SUSAN
Wilhelm, S., Rodehorst, K., Stepans, M. B. F., Hertzog, M.,
& Berens, C. (2008). Influence of levels of intention to breastfeed for six months and breastfeeding self-efficacy on duration of breastfeeding. Applied Nursing Research, 21, 123-130.
WILSON, MARGARET
Helgadóttir, H. L., & Wilson, M. E. (2008). Parents’ knowledge and choice of paracetamol dosing forms in 3-6 year old
children. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 22, 93-97.
YATES, BERNICE
Nieveen, J. L., Zimmerman, L. M., Barnason, S. A., & Yates,
B. C. (2008). Development and content validity testing of the
Cardiac Symptom Survey in patients after coronary artery
bypass grafting. Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and
Critical Care, 37(1), 17-27.
Peterson, J. A., Yates, B. C., & Hertzog, M. (2008). Heart and
soul physical activity program: Social support outcomes.
American Journal of Health Behavior, 32(5), 525-537.
ZIMMERMAN, LANI
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, L., Nieveen, J., Schulz, P.,
Miller, C., Hertzog, M., et al. (2008). The relationships
between fatigue and early postoperative recovery outcomes
over time in elderly coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)
surgery patients. Heart & Lung, 37(4), 245-256.
Nieveen, J. L., Zimmerman, L. M., Barnason, S. A., & Yates,
B. C. (2008). Development and content validity testing of the
Cardiac Symptom Survey in patients after coronary artery
bypass grafting. Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and
Critical Care, 37(1), 17-27.
GRIGSBY, KAREN
Foxall, M., Megel, M. E., Grigsby, K., & Billings, J. B. (2009).
Faculty retirement: Stemming the tide. Journal of Nursing
Education, 48(3), 172-175.
GROSS, GLORIA
Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss, J., Gross, G., & Lindsey, A.
(2009). Vitamin D insufficiency and musculoskeletal symptoms in breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy. Cancer Nursing, 32(2), 143-150.
Twiss, J., Waltman, N., Berg, K., Ott, C., Gross, G. &
Lindsey, A. (2009). An exercise intervention for breast cancer survivors with bone loss. Journal of Nursing Scholarship.
41(1), 20-27.
HERTZOG, MELODY
Stepans, M. B. F., Wilhelm, S., Rodehorst, K., Smith, D. T.,
Hertzog, M., & Weinert, C. (2009). Testing protocols: Care
of biological samples in a rural setting. Clinical Nursing
Research, 18 (1), 6-22.
Wielgus, K. K., Berger, A. M., & Hertzog, M. (2009). Predictors of fatigue 30 days after completing anthracycline plus
taxan adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Oncology
Nursing Forum, 36(1), 38-48.
HUDSON, DIANE BRAGE
Campbell-Grossman, C., Hudson, D.B., Keating-Lefler,
R., Yank, J., & Obafunwa, T. (2009). Community leaders’
perception of Hispanic, single, low-income mothers’ needs,
concerns, social support, and interactions with health care
services. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing. 32, 31-41.
KAISER, KATHERINE
Publications 2009
Barry, T. L., Kaiser, K.L., Lopez, P. & McNulty, M. (2009).
Participant satisfaction: Methods and outcomes in medicaid
managed care. Journal of Health Care Quality, 31(1), 21-29.
BARRY, TERESA
KEATING-LEFLER, REBECCA
Barry, T. L., Kaiser, K.L., Lopez, P. & McNulty, M. (2009).
Participant Satisfaction: Methods and Outcomes in Medicaid
Managed Care. Journal of Health Care Quality, 31(1), 21-29.
BERGER, ANN
Wielgus, K. K., Berger, A. M., & Hertzog, M. (2009). Predictors of fatigue 30 days after completing anthracycline plus
taxan adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Oncology
Nursing Forum, 36(1), 38-48.
CAMPBELL-GROSSMAN, CHRISTIE
Campbell-Grossman, C., Hudson, D.B., Keating-Lefler,
R., Yank, J., & Obafunwa, T. (2009). Community leaders’
perception of Hispanic, single, low-income mothers’ needs,
concerns, social support, and interactions with health care
services. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing. 32, 31-41.
COHEN, MARLENE
Cohen, M. Z., Hickey, J. V., & Upchurch, S. L., (2009). Faculty
workload calculation. Nursing Outlook. 57, 50-59.
Campbell-Grossman, C., Hudson, D.B., Keating-Lefler,
R., Yank, J., & Obafunwa, T. (2009). Community leaders’
perception of Hispanic, single, low-income mothers’ needs,
concerns, social support, and interactions with health care
services. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing. 32,31-41.
LAFRAMBOISE, LOUISE
Yates, B.C., Dodendorf, D., Lane, J., LaFramboise, L., Pozehl,
B., Duncan, K., & Knodel, K. (2009). Testing an alternate
informed consent process. Nursing Research, 58 (2), 135-139.
MEGEL, MARY
Foxall, M., Megel, M. E., Grigsby, K., & Billings, J. B. (2009).
Faculty retirement: Stemming the tide. Journal of Nursing
Education, 48(3), 172-175.
POZEHL, BUNNY
Yates, B.C., Dodendorf, D., Lane, J., LaFramboise, L., Pozehl,
B., Duncan, K., & Knodel, K. (2009). Testing an alternate
informed consent process. Nursing Research, 58 (2), 135-139
DUNCAN, KATHLEEN
Yates, B.C., Dodendorf, D., Lane, J., LaFramboise, L., Pozehl,
B., Duncan, K., & Knodel, K. (2009). Testing an alternate
informed consent process. Nursing Research, 58 (2),135-139.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
33
2008 — 2009
Publication
Professional journals
UNMC COLLEGE OF NURSING
RODEHORST, KIM
Stepans, M. B. F., Wilhelm, S., Rodehorst, K., Smith, D. T.,
Hertzog, M., & Weinert, C. (2009). Testing protocols: Care
of biological samples in a rural setting. Clinical Nursing
Research, 18 (1), 6-22.
SCHUMACHER, KAREN
Fletcher, B. A. S., Miaskowski, C., Schumacher, K. L., Dodd,
M., Paul, S. M., Cooper, B. A., Lee, K., West, C., Aouizerat, B. E.,
Swift, P. S., & Wara, W. (2009). Trajectories of fatigue in family caregivers of patients undergoing radiation therapy for
prostate cancer. Research in Nursing & Health, 32, 125-139.
THOMPSON, CHERYL
Thompson, C. B. (2009). Basics of research part 13: Descriptive data analysis, Air Medical Journal, 28, 56-59.
TWISS, JAN
Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss, J., Gross, G., & Lindsey, A.
(2009). Vitamin D insufficiency and musculoskeletal
symptoms in breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor
therapy. Cancer Nursing, 32(2), 143-150.
Twiss, J., Waltman, N., Berg, K., Ott, C., Gross, G. &
Lindsey, A. (2009). An exercise intervention for breast cancer
survivors with bone loss. Journal of Nursing Scholarship.
41(1), 20-27.
WALTMAN, NANCY
Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss, J., Gross, G., & Lindsey, A.
(2009). Vitamin D insufficiency and musculoskeletal symptoms in breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy. Cancer Nursing, 32(2), 143-150.
Twiss, J., Waltman, N., Berg, K., Ott, C., Gross, G. & Lindsey,
A. (2009). An exercise intervention for breast cancer survivors
with bone loss. Journal of Nursing Scholarship. 41(1), 20-27.
WIELGUS, KIM
Wielgus, K. K., Berger, A. M., & Hertzog, M. (2009). Predictors of fatigue 30 days after completing anthracycline plus
taxane adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Oncology
Nursing Forum, 36(1), 38-48.
WILHELM, SUSAN
Stepans, M. B. F., Wilhelm, S., Rodehorst, K., Smith, D. T.,
Hertzog, M., & Weinert, C. (2009). Testing protocols: Care of
Biological Samples in a Rural Setting. Clinical Nursing
Research, 18 (1), 6-22.
YATES, BERNICE
Yates, B.C., Dodendorf, D., Lane, J., LaFramboise, L., Pozehl,
B., Duncan, K., & Knodel, K. (2009). Testing an alternate
informed consent process. Nursing Research, 58(2), 135-139.
on physical activity and functioning following coronary
artery bypass surgery (CABS) among older adults with high
disease burden. Heart & Lung.
Schulz, P., Zimmerman, L, Pozehl, B., Barnason, S., &
Nieveen, J. (in press). Symptom management strategies used
by elderly patients following coronary artery bypass surgery.
Applied Nursing Research.
BARRY, TERESA
Kaiser, M., Kaiser, K. L., & Barry, T. L. (in press). Health
effects of life transitions for women and children: A research
model for public and community health nursing. Public
Health Nursing.
Kaiser, K. L., Barry, T. L., & Mason, A. (in press). Maternal
health and child asthma health services use. Journal of Clinical Nursing Research.
BERGER, ANN
Berger, A., Wielgus, K., Hertzog, M., Fischer, P. & Farr, L.
(in press). Activity circadian rhythm patterns and their relationships with fatigue and anxiety/depression in women
treated with breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy. Journal
of Supportive Care Cancer.
Berger, A.M. (in press). Update on the state of the science
on sleep-wake disturbances in adults with cancer. Oncology
Nursing Forum.
Page, M. & Berger, A. (in press). Oncology nursing society
putting evidence into practice resource on sleep-wake disturbances. In L. Eaton & J.Tipton (Eds.) Oncology Nursing Society Putting Evidence into Practice: Improving Oncology
Patient Outcomes. Pittsburgh, PA: Oncology Nursing Society.
Erickson, J., & Berger, A. (in press). Sleep-wake disturbances.
In C. Brown (Ed.), A guide to oncology symptom management.
Oncology Nursing Society.
Berger, A., Marunda, H. T, & Agrawal, S. (in press). Influence
of menopausal status on sleep and hot flashes throughout
breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy. Journal of Obstetric,
Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing.
Brady, S. L., & Berger, A. M. (in press). Nebraska veterans’
preferences for end of life care. Clinical Journal of Oncology
Nursing.
Berger, A., Lockhart, K., & Agrawal, S. (in press). Do patterns of
fatigue and quality of life differ over time based on breast cancer
adjuvant chemotherapy regimens? Oncology Nursing Forum.
BLACK, JOYCE
Langemo, D., Cuddigan, J., Baharestani, M., Ratliff, C.,
Posthauer, M. E., & Black, J. (in press). Pressure ulcer guidelines: “Minding the gaps” as we develop new guidelines.
Advances in Skin and Wound Care.
CAMPBELL-GROSSMAN, CHRISTIE
Publications 2009 In Press
BARNASON, SUE
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, L., Nieveen, J., Schulz, P.,
Miller, C., Hertzog, M., & Tu, C. (in press). Influence of a
symptom management telehealth intervention on older
adults’ early recovery outcomes following coronary artery
bypass surgery (CABS). Heart & Lung.
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, L., Schulz, P., & Tu, C. (in
press). Influence of an early recovery telehealth intervention
34
2009 advances
Campbell-Grossman, C., Hudson, D.B., Keating-Lefler, R.,
& Heusinkvelt, S., (in press). New mothers network: The provision of social support to single low-income, African American mothers via e-mail messages. Journal of Family Nursing.
Hudson, D. B., Campbell-Grossman, C. G., KeatingLefler, R., Carrahar, S., & Fehle, J. (in press). Single, lowincome African American mothers. MCN: American Journal
of Maternal Child Nursing.
COHEN, MARLENE
Bruera, E., Bush, S. H., Willey, J., Paraskevopoulos, T., Li, Z.,
Palmer, J. L., Cohen, M. Z., Elsayem, A., & Sivesind, D. (in press).
The impact of delirium and recall on the level of distress in patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers, Cancer.
Tamayo, G., Broxson, A., Munsell, M., & Cohen, M. Z. (in
press). Caring for the caregiver. Oncology Nursing Forum.
Cohen, M. Z., Pace, E., Kaur, G., & Bruera, E. (in press).
Delirium and distress in patients with advanced cancer and
their family caregivers. Journal of Palliative Care
Cohen, M. Z., & Bankston, S. (in press). Cancer-related distress. In C. Yarbro, D. Wujcik, & B. Gobel (Eds.), Cancer
Nursing (7th ed.). Boston: Jones and Bartlett.
Wiener, B., Chacko, S., Brown, T., Cron, S., & Cohen, M. Z.
(in press). Delphi survey of research priorities. Journal of
Nursing Management.
CRAMER, MARY
Cramer, M., Duncan, K., Megel, M., & Pitkin, S. (in press).
Partnering with rural communities to meet the demand for
qualified nursing workforce. Nursing Outlook.
CUDDIGAN, JANET
Langemo, D., Cuddigan, J., Baharestani, M., Ratliff, C.,
Posthauer, M. E., & Black, J. (in press). Pressure ulcer guidelines: “Minding the gaps” as we develop new guidelines.
Advances in Skin and Wound Care.
DUNCAN, KATHLEEN
Norman, J. F., Pozehl, B. J., Duncan, K. A., Hertzog, M. A.,
Elokda, A. S., & Krueger, S. K. (in press). Relationship of resting b-type natriuretic peptide level to cardiac work and total
physical work capacities in heart failure patients. Journal of
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation & Prevention.
Cramer, M., Duncan, K., Megel, M., & Pitkin, S. (in press).
Partnering with rural communities to meet the demand for
qualified nursing workforce. Nursing Outlook.
GROSS, GLORIA
White, J., Vener, J., Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss. J., Gross, G.,
McGuire, R., & Dwyer, A. (in press). Evaluation of an instrument to measure adherence to strength training in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Oncology Nursing Forum.
HERTZOG, MELODY
Sittner, B.J., Schmaderer, M., Zimmerman, L., Hertzog,
M., & George, B. (in press). Rapid response team: Simulated
training for enhancing patient safety (STEPS). Clinical Simulation in Nursing.
Norman, J. F., Pozehl, B. J., Duncan, K. A., Hertzog, M. A.,
Elokda, A. S., & Krueger, S. K. (in press). Relationship of resting b-type natriuretic peptide level to cardiac work and total
physical work capacities in heart failure patients. Journal of
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation & Prevention.
Walker, S.N., Pullen, C.H., Boeckner, L.S., Hageman, P.A.,
Hertzog, M., Oberdorfer, M.K., & Rutledge, M.J. (in press).
Clinical trial of tailored physical activity and eating newsletters with older rural women. Nursing Research.
Berger, A., Wielgus, K., Hertzog, M., Fischer, P. & Farr, L.
(in press). Activity circadian rhythm patterns and their relationships with fatigue and anxiety/depression in women
treated with breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy. Journal
of Supportive Care Cancer.
HUDSON, DIANE BRAGE
Hudson, D. B., Campbell-Grossman, C. G., KeatingLefler, R., Carrahar, S., & Fehle, J. (in press). Single, lowincome African American mothers. MCN: American
Journal of Maternal Child Nursing.
Campbell-Grossman, C., Hudson, D.B., Keating –Lefler,
R., & Heusinkvelt, S. (in press). New mothers network:
The provision of social support to single, low-income,
African American mothers via e-mail messages. Journal
of Family Nursing.
KAISER, KATHY
Kaiser, K. L., Barry, T. L., & Mason, A. (in press). Maternal
health and child asthma health services use. Journal of Clinical Nursing Research.
KEATING-LEFLER, REBECCA
Hudson, D. B., Campbell-Grossman, C. G., KeatingLefler, R., Carrahar, S., &Fehle, J. (in press). Single, lowincome African American mothers. MCN: American Journal
of Maternal Child Nursing.
LAFRAMBOISE, LOUISE
LaFramboise, L. M., Woster, J., Yager, A., & Yates, B. C. (in
press). A technological life buoy: Patient perceptions of the
Health Buddy®. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.
MATHEWS, THERESE
Mathews, T. L., Fawcett, S.B., & Sheldon, J.B. (in press).
Effects of a peer engagement program on socially withdrawn
children with a history of maltreatment. Child & Family
Behavior Therapy.
MEGEL, MARY
PULLEN, CAROL
TWISS, JANICE
Pullen, C. H., Hageman, P. A , Boeckner, L. S., Oberdorfer,
M. K., &. Walker, S. N. (in press). Feasibility of Internetdelivered weight loss interventions among rural women ages
50-69. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy.
Walker, S.N., Pullen, C.H., Boeckner, L.S., Hageman,P.A.,
Hertzog, M., Oberdorfer, M.K., & Rutledge, M.J. (in press).
Clinical trial of tailored physical activity and eating newsletters with older rural women. Nursing Research.
White, J., Vener, J., Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss. J., Gross, G.,
McGuire, R., & Dwyer, A. (in press). Evaluation of an instrument to measure adherence to strength training in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Oncology Nursing Forum.
RICE, MICHAEL
Records, K., & Rice, M. J. (in press). Lifetime physical and
sexual abuse and the risk for depression symptoms in the
first 8 months after birth. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology.
RODEHORST, KIM
Holkup, P. A., Rodehorst, T. K. C., Wilhelm, S. L., Kuntz, S.
W., Weinert, C., Stepans, M. F., Salois, E. M., Left Hand Bull,
J., & Hill, W. G. (in press). Research Among Tribal Communities: Experiences of Four Academic Institutions. Journal of
Transcultural Nursing.
SCHULZ, PAULA
Schulz, P., Zimmerman, L., Pozehl, B., Barnason, S., &
Nieveen, J. (in press). Symptom management strategies used
by elderly patients following coronary artery bypass surgery.
Applied Nursing Research.
VISOVSKY, CONNIE
Margalit, R., Thompson, S., Visovsky, C., Geske, J., Collier,
D., Birk, T. & Paulman, P. (in press). From professional silos
to interprofessional education: Campus-wide focus on quality of care. Quality Management in Health Care.
WALKER, SUSAN
Pullen, C. H., Hageman, P. A , Boeckner, L. S., Oberdorfer,
M. K., &. Walker, S. N. (in press). Feasibility of Internetdelivered weight loss interventions among rural women ages
50-69. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy.
Walker, S.N., Pullen, C.H., Boeckner, L.S., Hageman,P.A.,
Hertzog, M., Oberdorfer, M.K., & Rutledge, M.J. (in press).
Clinical trial of tailored physical activity and eating newsletters with older rural women. Nursing Research.
WALTMAN, NANCY
White, J., Vener, J., Waltman, N., Ott, C., Twiss. J., Gross, G.,
McGuire, R., & Dwyer, A. (in press). Evaluation of an instrument to measure adherence to strength training in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Oncology Nursing Forum.
Cramer, M., Duncan, K., Megel, M., & Pitkin, S. (in press).
Partnering with rural communities to meet the demand for
qualified nursing workforce. Nursing Outlook.
Wilson, M.E., Megel, M. E., Carlson, K. L., & Enenbach, L.
(in press). Voices of children: Stories about hospitalization,
Journal of Pediatric Health Care.
Sittner, B.J., Schmaderer, M., Zimmerman, L., Hertzog,
M., & George, B. (in press). Rapid response team: Simulated
training for enhancing patient safety (STEPS). Clinical
Simulation in Nursing.
Berger, A., Wielgus, K., Hertzog, M., Fischer, P. & Farr, L.
(in press). Activity circadian rhythm patterns and their relationships with fatigue and anxiety/depression in women
treated with breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy. Journal
of Supportive Care Cancer.
MILLER, CONNIE
SITTNER, BARB
Barnason, S., Zimmerman, L., Nieveen, J., Schulz, P.,
Miller, C., Hertzog, M. & Rasmussen, D. (in press). The
influence of fatigue on recovery outcomes of elderly patients
following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.
Heart & Lung.
WILHELM, SUSAN
Sittner, B.J., Schmaderer, M., Zimmerman, L., Hertzog,
M., & George, B. (in press). Rapid response team: Simulated
training for enhancing patient safety (STEPS). Clinical
Simulation in Nursing.
Sittner, B. J. & Palmer, D. (Eds.). (in press). Complex Clinical
Cases. The Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing.
Holkup, P. A., Rodehorst, T. K. C., Wilhelm, S. L., Kuntz, S.
W., Weinert, C., Stepans, M. F., Salois, E. M., Left Hand Bull,
J., & Hill, W. G. (in press). Research among tribal communities: Experiences of four academic institutions. Journal of
Transcultural Nursing.
THOMPSON, CHERYL
Wilson, M. E., Eilers, J., Heermann, J. A., & Million, R., (in press).
The experience of spouses as informal caregivers for recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Cancer Nursing.
Wilson, M.E., Megel, M. E., Carlson, K. L., & Enenbach, L.
(in press). Voices of children: Stories about hospitalization,
Journal of Pediatric Health Care.
NELSON, AUDREY
Nelson, A. E., Genthe, J. A., Bertrang, K. M., & Edwards, E.
(in press). Patterns of youths' glycemic control with insulin
pump therapy. Pediatric Nursing.
SCHMADERER, MYRA
Schulz, P., Zimmerman, L, Pozehl, B., Barnason, S., &
Nieveen, J. (in press). Symptom management strategies used
by elderly patients following coronary artery bypass surgery.
Applied Nursing Research.
Erler, C. J., & Thompson, C. B. (in press). Basics of research
(Part 11): Ethics, human rights, and clinical research. Air
Medical Journal.
Thompson, C. B. (in press). Basics of research part 13:
Quantitative data analysis. Air Medical Journal.
Allua, S. & Thompson, C. B. (in press). Basics of research
part 14: Hypothesis Testing
PITKIN, STEVE
THOMPSON, SARAH
Cramer, M., Duncan, K., Megel, M., & Pitkin, S. (in press).
Partnering with rural communities to meet the demand for
qualified nursing workforce. Nursing Outlook.
Duncan, J.G., Bott, M.J., Forbes-Thompson, S., & Gajewski,
B.J. (in press). Relative rates of symptom occurrence and
associated clinical factors in nursing home residents with
cancer. Research in Nursing and Health.
Tilden, V. P., & Thompson, S. (in press). Policy issues in end
of life care. Journal of Professional Nursing.
Margalit, R., Thompson, S., Visovsky, C., Geske, J., Collier,
D., Birk, T. & Paulman, P. (in press). From professional silos
to interprofessional education: Campus-wide focus on quality of care. Quality Management in Health Care.
NIEVEEN, JANET
POZEHL, BUNNY
Norman, J. F., Pozehl, B. J., Duncan, K. A., Hertzog, M. A.,
Elokda, A. S., & Krueger, S. K. (in press). Relationship of resting b-type natriuretic peptide level to cardiac work and total
physical work capacities in heart failure patients. Journal of
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation & Prevention.
Schulz, P., Zimmerman, L, Pozehl, B., Barnason, S., &
Nieveen, J. (in press). Symptom management strategies used
by elderly patients following coronary artery bypass surgery.
Applied Nursing Research.
TILDEN, VIRGINIA
Tilden, V. P., & Thompson, S. (in press). Policy issues in end
of life care. Journal of Professional Nursing.
WIELGUS, KIM
WILSON, MARGARET
YATES, BERNICE
Carey, M.G., & Yates, B.C. (in press). American Heart Association, Scientific Council of Cardiovascular Nursing. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.
LaFramboise, L. M., Woster, J., Yager, A., & Yates, B.C. (in
press). A technological life buoy: Patient perceptions of the
Health Buddy.® Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.
ZIMMERMAN, LANI
Schulz, P., Zimmerman, L., Pozehl, B., Barnason, S., &
Nieveen, J. (in press). Symptom management strategies
used by elderly patients following coronary artery bypass
surgery. Applied Nursing Research.
Sittner, B.J., Schmaderer, M., Zimmerman, L., Hertzog,
M., & George, B. (in press). Rapid response team: Simulated
training for enhancing patient safety (STEPS). Clinical
Simulation in Nursing.
www.unmc.edu/nursing
35
Nursing rolls.
MSN
Nursing rules.
PhD
|
UNMC.EDU/NURSING
|
OMAHA
Visit www.unmc.edu/alumni for details. Watch your mail for registration information.
One Class – World Class
October 2 – 3
2009 UNMC Alumni Weekend
8 0 0 6 2 6 - 8 4 3 1 E X T. 5 1 8 4
|
|
KEARNEY
|
SCOTTSBLUFF
UNMC College of Nursing
985330 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha NE 68198-5330
advances
LINCOLN
W E A L W AY S S E E K T O P - N O T C H S T U D E N T S & F I R S T- R AT E F A C U LT Y — I N Q U I R I E S M O S T W E L C O M E
U N M C I S A W O R L D - C L A S S H E A LT H S C I E N C E C E N T E R W I T H G L O B A L L E A R N I N G T E C H N O L O G I E S
CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED
Omaha, NE
Permit No. 454
PAID
Non-Profit Org
US Postage
Partner with us. Call Now.
Nursing rocks.
BSN
Lots of options. Lots of specialties. A million ways to help people.
Nursing is the frontline of health. Nurses are the face of patient care. What could be more important?
a
Nursing is the frontline of health. Nurses are the face of patient care. What could be more important?
advances
university of nebraska medical center college of nursing 2009
Who will care
for you and yours?
MIA: Nebraska’s
critical nursing shortage.
Brain IVs
Teachers inject
stimulus Page12
Special section
Solving the nurse
deficit Page15
Pocket alums
Legacy notes in
white coats Page 23
Next gen RN
The fresh face
of care Page24
Fly UP