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WWS 541: International Politics (MPA seminar)

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WWS 541: International Politics (MPA seminar)
WWS 541 International Politics
Princeton University
Woodrow Wilson School Graduate Program
Fall 2003
Tuesday 1-4pm
Robertson Hall, room 011
Professor Christina Davis
E-mail: [email protected]
Phone: (609)258-0177
Office: 324 Bendheim Hall
Office hours: Thursday 2-4pm
Course description
This course introduces theories of international relations and evaluates their explanation of
foreign policy decisions and general patterns in world affairs over the last century. Broadly
covering security policy and international political economy, topics include the causes of
war, the role of international organizations, the politics of trade negotiations, and international cooperation for environmental protection. We will discuss the interaction between
domestic and international actors in foreign policy, the role of non-state actors, and the
constraints on state power that arise from globalization.
Course Assignments and Grading
Class participation: 20 percent
Presentation: 20 percent
Two Short papers: 30 percent
Research paper or final exam: 30 percent
Students will be expected to do the readings and participate in seminars. Contribution
to discussion will be part of the participation grade. Once during the semester, each
student will give a presentation that connects themes from the readings for the week with a
contemporary policy issue. Two students may work together for a joint presentation. Two
short papers (3-4 pages) written on a question related to the readings will be required. One
paper should be about a topic covered during the first 6 weeks, and a second paper should
be about a topic covered during the final 6 weeks of the course. The paper is due at the
beginning of class on the day that we will discuss the readings that you address in your
paper (late papers will not be accepted). Students will have the choice between writing an
individual research paper or taking a final exam.
A research paper should combine theoretically informed discussion of a policy problem
with suggestions for policy solutions to improve outcomes. For those writing a paper, you
should stop by office hours to discuss your topic, and a 2-4 page proposal is due October
24th. The final 15-20 page paper is due at 4pm on January 13. Late papers will be deducted
one-third letter grade for each day past the due date.
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For the exam, you will receive a list of questions in early December as a study guide
(group studying is encouraged). The exam questions will be chosen from this list and given
to you January 14th at 9am, and answers will be due at 4pm. Late exams will be deducted
one-third letter grade for each hour past the due date.
Readings suggested for purchase
Robert Art and Robert Jervis ed. International Politics: Enduring Concepts and
Contemporary Issues. 6th ed. New York: Longman, 2003.
Ikenberry, G. John. After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding
of Order after Major Wars. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2001.
Waltz, Kenneth. Man, the State, and War: A Theoretical Analysis. New York:
Columbia University Press, 1959.
Sagan, Scott and Kenneth Waltz. The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate. New
York: W.W. Norton and Company, 2003.
Readings marked with an asterisk are included in a course packet available for purchase
and are also on reserve at Stokes Library. Readings marked with two asterisks are not
included in the packet. These are available from JSTOR, and you can print them from the
link at the course website.
The Nature of the International System
• Week 1 (Sept. 16) Anarchy and Power
Thucydides. “The Melian Dialogue” History of the Peloponnesian War. Trans.
Rex Warner. London: Penguin, 1972. pp. 400–408.*
Kenneth Waltz. Man, the State, and War: A Theoretical Analysis. New York:
Columbia University Press, 1959. pp. 1–41, 159–238.
Gilpin, Robert. War and Change in World Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 1981. pp. 9–49, 186–210.*
Gilpin, Robert. “The Nature of Political Economy.” In Art and Jervis (2002),
pp.281–297.
• Week 2 (Sept. 23) International Society, War, and Peace
Ikenberry, G. John. After Victory. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press,
2001. pp. 3–79.
Jervis, Robert. “Theories of War in an Era of Leading-Power Peace.” American
Political Science Review 96, no. 1 (March 2002): 1–14.*
Doyle, Michael. “Liberalism in World Politics.” The American Political Science
Review 80 no. 4 (1986): 1151-69.**
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• Week 3 (Sept. 30) Strategies
Frieden, Jeffry A. “Actors and Preferences in International Relations.” in Strategic
Choice and International Relations. Ed. David Lake and Robert Powell.
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999. pp.39–76.*
Morrow, James D. “The Strategic Setting of Choices: Signaling, Commitment, and
Negotiation in International Politics.” in Strategic Choice and International
Relations. Ed. David Lake and Robert Powell. Princeton, NJ: Princeton
University Press, 1999. pp.77–114.*
Oye, Kenneth. “The Conditions for Cooperation in World Politics.” In Art and
Jervis (2002), pp. 81–94.
Schelling, Thomas. “The Diplomacy of Violence.” In Art and Jervis (2002), pp.
166–179.
Jervis, Robert. “Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma.” In Art and Jervis
(2002), pp. 180–199.
Mueller, John. “The Irrelevance of Nuclear Weapons.” In Art and Jervis (2002),
pp. 207–220.
Jervis, Robert. “The Utility of Nuclear Deterrence.” In Art and Jervis (2002), pp.
221–229.
• Week 4 (Oct. 7) Decision-making, Domestic Politics and Foreign Policy
Khong, Yuen Foong. Analogies at War: Korea, Munich, Dien Bien Phu, and the
Vietnam Decisions of 1965. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992. pp.
3–18, 97-147 (skim this chapter), 251-263.*
Weinberg, Gerhard. “No Road From Munich to Iraq.” The Washington Post 3
November 2002.*
Allison, Graham. “Conceptual Models and the Cuban Missile Crisis.” The
American Political Science Review. 63, no. 3 (September 1969): 689–718.**
Purdum, Todd. “The Missiles of 1962 Haunt the Iraq Debate.” The New York
Times 13 October 2002.*
Martin, Lisa. Democratic Commitments: Legislatures and International
Cooperation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000. pp. 21–52.*
Sobel, Richard. The Impact of Public Opinion on U.S. Foreign Policy Since
Vietnam. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. pp. 9–47, 143-174.*
• Week 5 (Oct. 14) International Institutions
Ikenberry, G. John. After Victory. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press,
2001. pp. 163–273.
Keohane, Robert. “A Functional Theory of Regimes.” In Art and Jervis (2002),
pp. 131–137.
Chayes, Abram and Antonia Handler Chayes. “On Compliance.” International
Organization 47, no. 2 (Spring 1993): 175–205.**
Alter, Karen. “Who are the ‘Masters of the Treaty’ ? European Governments and
the European Court of Justice.” International Organization 52, no. 1 (Winter
1998): 121–147.*
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• Week 6 (Oct. 21) Globalization and Development
Spero, Joan and Jeffrey Hart. The Politics of International Economic Relations.
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 2003. pp. 1-11, 171–191.*
Rodrik, Dani. “Trading in Illusions.” In Art and Jervis (2002), pp. 495-502.
Stiglitz, Joseph and Lyn Squire. “International Development: Is It Possible?” In
International Political Economy: Perspectives on Power and Wealth, edited by
Jeffry Frieden and David Lake. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, 2000.
pp. 383–391.*
Kapur, Devesh. “The IMF: A Cure or a Curse?” Foreign Policy (Summer 1998):
114–129.*
Summers, Lawrence H. “International Financial Crises: Causes, Prevention, and
Cures.” The American Economic Review 90, no. 2 (May 2000): 1–16.*
Schraeder, Peter J., Steven W. Hook, and Bruce Taylor. “Clarifying the Foreign
Aid Puzzle: A Comparison of American, Japanese, French, and Swiss Aid
Flows.” World Politics 50, no. 2 (1998): 294–323.*
• FALL RECESS (no class Oct. 28)
Topics in International Relations
• Week 7 (Nov. 4) The Politics of Trade Negotiations
Jackson, John. The World Trading System: Law and Policy of International
Economic Relations. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. pp. 1–30.*
Hippler Bello, Judith. “The WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding: Less is
More.” American Journal of International Law 90, no. 3 (July 1996):
416–418.*
Davis, Christina. Food Fights over Free Trade: How International Institutions
Promote Agricultural Trade Liberalization. Princeton: Princeton University
Press, 2003. pp. 1–33, 178–223.
Steinberg, Richard. “In the Shadow of Law or Power? Consensus-Based
Bargaining and Outcomes in the GATT/WTO.” International Organization
56, no. 2 (Spring 2002): 339–374.*
Tussie, Diana and Miguel Lengyel. “Developing Countries: Turning Participation
into Influence.” In Hoekman, Mattoo, and English ed. Development, Trade,
and the WTO Washington DC: The World Bank, 2002. pp.485–492.*
• Week 8 (Nov. 11) Engagement and Sanctions
Keohane, Robert and Joseph Nye. “Complex Interdependence and the Role of
Force.” In Art and Jervis (2002), pp. 231–246.
Art, Robert. “The Fungibility of Force.” In Art and Jervis (2002), pp. 247–262.
Martin, Lisa. “Credibility, Costs, and Institutions: Cooperation on Economic
Sanctions.” World Politics 45, no. 3 (April 1993): 406–432.**
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Juster, Kenneth. “The United States and Iraq: Perils of Engagement.” In Richard
N. Haass Meghan L. O’Sullivan ed., Honey and Vinegar: Incentives, Sanctions,
and Foreign Policy. Washington: Brookings Institution, 2000. pp. 51–69.*
Suettinger, Robert Lee. “The United States and China: Tough Entanglement.” In
Richard N. Haass Meghan L. O’Sullivan ed., Honey and Vinegar: Incentives,
Sanctions, and Foreign Policy. Washington: Brookings Institution, 2000. pp.
12–32.*
• Week 9 (Nov. 18) Terrorism and Proliferation
Sagan, Scott and Kenneth Waltz. The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate. New
York: W.W. Norton and Company, 2003. 1-124 required (125-184
recommended).
Betts, Richard. “The New Threat of Mass Destruction” Foreign Affairs 77, no. 1
(Jan/Feb 1998): 26-41.*
Byford, Grenville. “The Wrong War” Foreign Affairs 81, no. 4 (Jul/Aug 2002):
34-43.*
Hoge, James and Gideon Rose. How Did This Happen? Terrorism and the New
Order. New York: the Council on Foreign Relations, 2001. pp. 53–82, 199–209,
225–240.*
Stern, Jessica. “The Protean Enemy” Foreign Affairs 82, no. 4 (Jul/Aug 2003).*
• Week 10 (Nov. 25) NGOs and Environmental Policy
Mathews, Jessica. “Power Shift.” In Art and Jervis (2002), pp. 539–550.
Hardin, Garrett. “The Tragedy of the Commons.” In Art and Jervis (2002), pp.
511–516.
Keck, Margaret and Kathryn Sikkink. “Transnational Activist Networks” In Art
and Jervis (2002), pp. 557-563.
Keck, Margaret and Kathryn Sikkink. Activists Beyond Borders. Ithaca, NY:
Cornell University Press, 1998. pp. 121–150.*
Haas, Peter M. “Do Regimes Matter? Epistemic Communities and Mediterranean
Pollution Control,” International Organization 43, no. 3. (Summer 1989):
377–403.**
DeSombre, Elizabeth R. Domestic Sources of International Environmental Policy:
Industry Environmentalists, and U.S. Power. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press,
2000. pp. 1–17, 171–191.*
• Week 11 (Dec. 2) Human Rights and Intervention
Mutua, Makau wa. “Politics and Human Rights: an Essential Symbiosis.” In
Michael Byers ed. The Role of Law in International Politics. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2000. pp. 149–175.*
Franck, Thomas. “Are Human Rights Universal?” Foreign Affairs 80 no. 1
(Jan-Feb 2001): 191-204.*
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Moravcsik, Andrew. “Explaining International Human Rights Regimes: Liberal
Theory and Western Europe.” European Journal of International Relations 1,
no. 2 (1995): 157-189.*
Krasner, Stephen. Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy. Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 1999. pp. 105-126.*
Hoffmann, Stanley. “The Politics and Ethics of Military Intervention.” Survival 37,
no. 4 (Winter 1995-96): 58–78.*
• Week 12 (Dec. 9) The Future
Huntington, Samuel. “The Clash of Civilizations?” In Art and Jervis, pp. 411–425.
Hoffmann, Stanley. “Clash of Globalizations.” Foreign Affairs 81, no. 4
(July/August 2002): 104–115.*
Slaughter, Anne-Marie. “The Real New World Order.” Foreign Affairs 76, no. 5
(Sept/Oct 1997): 183-197.
Waltz, Kenneth. “Structural Realism after the Cold War.” International Security
25, no. 1 (Summer 2000): 5-41.
Kagan, Robert. “Power and Weakness.” Policy Review (June/July 2002): 3-28.*
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